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2. Research method - Durham e-Theses
Durham E-Theses
Japanese students' EFL experience: the role of the
student's voice
SHIMAZU, SHIGEKO
How to cite:
SHIMAZU, SHIGEKO (2013)
Japanese students' EFL experience: the role of the student's voice,
Durham
theses, Durham University. Available at Durham E-Theses Online: http://etheses.dur.ac.uk/7351/
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Academic Support Oce, Durham University, University Oce, Old Elvet, Durham DH1 3HP
e-mail: [email protected] Tel: +44 0191 334 6107
http://etheses.dur.ac.uk
University of Durham
Japanese students‟ EFL experience: the role of the students‟ voice
By
Shigeko Shimazu
In Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of
Master of Education
2013
0
Acknowledgements
I acknowledge the support by Professor Byram and Professor Fleming with gratitude for
the help, and the stimulation that I have received. My acknowledgement would also be
incomplete without the recognition of the students who reported their views and
suggestions that are often ignored in public debates but contribute to the research
framework of this study. Finally, I am grateful to my parents and children, and friends in
Durham who gave me trust over the years.
1
Declaration
I confirm that this is my own work and that it has not been previously submitted in
candidature to this or any other university.
2
Statement of Copyright
The copyright of this thesis rests with the author. No quotation from it should be published
without the author's prior written consent and information derived from it should be
acknowledged
3
List of contents
page
Acknowledgement
1
Declaration
2
Statement of Copyright
3
List of contents
4
List of tables
9
List of Abbreviations
10
Abstract
11
Chapter I Introduction
12
1 Background of the study
12
2 Current debates in Japan
14
3 Contextual background
`
15
4 The statement of problems
16
5 The purpose of this thesis
17
6 The research questions
18
7. Overview of the research
20
8. The originality of this research
20
9. The organization of the thesis
21
4
II. Literature Review
22
Introduction
22
1. General evaluation of language learning in Japan
23
a) Communicative skills
23
b) Pronunciation
23
c) TOEFL scores
23
2. Instruction
24
d) Teacher centred instruction
25
e) The focal skills approach
25
f) The Direct translation method
27
g) The grammar translation method
28
3. Environment
28
h) EFL in the education system
29
i) University entrance examination
30
j) Fear of internationalization
32
k) Curriculum reform
33
4. Personal factors
34
l) Motivation
36
m) Attitudes
38
n) Reticence
40
5
III. Research Methodology
45
Introduction
45
1. Research Paradigms
45
2. Research Method
47
3. Qualitative method of the present study
47
3-a) The research question of the study
48
3-b) Reasons for choosing the research questions
49
3-c) Justification of the Qualitative method
54
3-d) linking the interview questions to the research question
55
3-e) Pilot Study
58
3-f) Reflection of the Pilot Study
59
4. Description of the interview process
61
4-a) Instrument
62
4-b) Participants
63
4-c) Data collection
63
5. Data Analysis
64
5-a) Transcription and extension of the interviews
64
5-b) Translations
65
5-c) Thematic analysis
66
5-d) Credibility, Transferability, Dependability, Conformability
68
6
5-e) Ethical issues
71
IV. Data Analysis
72
Introduction
72
1 - a) The use of the Monolingual Method
73
1 - b) The advantages and disadvantages of NETs, and NNETs
76
1 - c) The belief “the earlier, the better”
96
1 - d) English as a lingua franca or Standard English
108
1 - e) The use of the Direct Method
120
1- f) The EFL goal and the pedagogical approach
130
1 - g) Language skills and national power
140
1 - h) The Japanese students‟ English proficiency
150
2 - i) The attitudes toward and their opportunities for EFL
162
2 - j) How did the students acquired their English skills?
182
2 - k) What type of English skills do students wish to learn?
204
2 – l) What kind of change do student want in EFL?
218
V. Discussion and Conclusion
229
1. Introduction
229
2. The meaning of the findings and the comparison to the literature
230
3. Summary
241
4. Conclusion
243
5. Limitations of the study
246
6. Reflection
247
VI. References
250
VII. Appendices
273
Appendix 1
Interview questions for the pilot study
274
Appendix 2
The pilot study details
276
7
Appendix 3
Research questions for the main study
278
Appendix 4
Invitation to the research
281
Appendix 5
Consent Form
282
Appendix 6
Interview transcription 4)
283
Appendix 7
Interview transcription 7)
301
Appendix 8
English skills
331
1
Self assessed English skills
331
2
Least proficient English skills
331
3
English skills for the current needs
331
4
English skills for the future needs
331
8
List of Tables
1.1
Research Questions
11.2
Codes and Categories
1V.1
Proficiency Skills
9
List of Abbreviations
Abbreviations
CLT
Communicative language teaching
EFL
English as a foreign language
ELT
English language teaching
JALT
Japan Association of Language Teachers
JET
Japanese Exchange and Teaching Program
Juku
Coaching class
Yokibo
Cramming class
L2
Second language
LF
Lingua Franca
MEXT
Ministry of Education, Culture, Science and Technology
NS
Native English Speakers
NNS
Non-native English speakers
NET
Native English teachers
NNET
Non-native English Teachers
TESOL
Teaching English as a second or foreign language
TEFL
Teaching English as a forging language
TOEFL
Text of English as a foreign language
TOEIC
the Test of English for International Communication
10
Japanese students‟ EFL experience: the role of the students‟ voice
Abstract
Japanese students are often said to have little success in developing communicative skills
in a foreign language. This is evident from Japanese media, researchers in education,
public concern, and from government policy documents. Much of the existing research has
examined factors in the environment or in the psychology of the learners. However,
Japanese students „views have not been adequately taken into consideration in the debate.
This study investigates Japanese students „views about the teaching of English as a foreign
language (EFL). In doing so, two main research questions are set; 1) What are students‟
opinions about EFL principles? 2) What are Japanese students‟ experiences in the EFL
classroom? The data was collected from 14 Japanese students at universities in Tokyo by
interviews. Thematic analysis was used to identify similarities and differences between
participants‟ views. The data shows that: 1) the students were well informed and had clear
views; 2) they do not consider the situation problematic; 3) instead, they offered possible
causes of the factors that affect English performance and suggestions for improving
practice. Finally, several suggestions are offered to improve EFL classes arising from the
students‟ views.
11
I. Introduction
1. Background of the study
In the past few decades, the demands of higher education in Japan have increased and
competition is fierce. University entrance examination is a challenging process for
Japanese students. For them, English is one of the most important subjects to qualify for
higher education. In addition, due to spread of English around the world, students are
facing a challenge to master communicative skills in English for intercultural
communication. As a result, increasing numbers of students are seeking coaching after
school in Asian countries including Japan. A few decades ago, the fact that communicative
skills in English were not tested was unsurprising since it was not a globalized world. In a
new competitive world, could native English speakers of English become the
front-runners? Alternatively, what happens to students who have less developed English
skills?
In making a pitch to lead in the global society, Non Native English Speaker (hereafter
NNS) countries have taken steps to encourage students to improve communicative skills in
English for various reasons but mainly
to secure national security (e.g. political and
economic power). However, critics of World English such as Phillipson (1992) argue that
the dominant use of English language for global communication leads to imbalance of
power - linguistic imperialism - a term that he coined.
Referring to the interrelationships between language and power, Kachru (1992:66) claimed
that the non-native models of English are linguistically identifiable, geographically
definable, and functionally acceptable, but they are still not necessarily attitudinally
acceptable. Native models of English in this study are defined as English spoken by native
English speaking countries (namely, Received Pronunciation (hereafter RP) and General
12
American (hereafter GA) (Kachru 1992:50). Kachru (ibid.) noted that the spread of English
stretches in three concentric circles; an inner circle where English is spoken as a mother
tongue, an outer circle where English is used in institutional setting, and in an expanding
circle where English is used for global communication. The characteristics of English in
these societies derive from the patterns of acquisition and the functional domains of
English. Consequently, inevitable linguistic changes are taking places in English with local
variations.
One of the problems that arise here is that the language changes, namely in spoken
language, affect interpretability. The issues are important for intelligibility and pedagogical
reasons (Kachru 1992:49). In addition, varieties of English have a close relationship with
cultural identities as we recognized in RP and GA. Both native speakers (hereafter NS) and
non-native speakers of English (hereafter NNS) need to be aware of the situation to
encourage learning from each other.
Against a background of globalization and world Englishes, many researchers have been
inspired to investigate the EFL situation in Japan and observe that EFL at Japanese schools
is problematic. I observed that Japanese students tend to make English communication
harder by thinking too much about using correct forms of English (e.g. NS‟ pronunciation
with correct grammar) rather than trial-and-error and focus on successful communication.
Consequently, their English could be a poor imitation of native speakers. What stimulates
communicative skills? There are two views in Japan that communicative skills in English
are nurtured by experience while some others discern that language skills are prominently
a matter of nature (i.e. personality, culture). The issues are controversial and complex
because how English is learned involves various aspects of ELT i.e. pedagogical,
educational, psychological, and socio-cultural issues.
13
Ⅰ
2.
Current debates in Japan
Some researchers taking the second view hold that Japanese students are innately inferior
in language study. For example, Honna (1995:57) stated that:
The late Edwin O. Reischauer, former UA ambassador to Japan, seriously listed
Japan‟s miserable performance in English teaching as one of the seven wonders of
the world.
In this respect, Seargeant, (2008:122) summarized the debate of EFL in Japan as follows,
It has long been a received truth that EFL in Japan is a problematic issue, and that
the students‟ achievement has failed to match educational investment. While a great
deal of research has been carried out in this area, the difficulty in effecting positive
changes in an education system, which is characterized as being incompatible with
contemporary theories of language learning remains a constant theme... The issue
has become an explicit priority in many of the policy reforms enacted by
governments, as English language education is increasingly being associated with
wider social changes, especially those relating to Japan‟s international
relationships...within the global community.
Seargeant (ibid) suggested that it is not just individual students but also entire schools have
little success effecting changes in EFL. However, the arguments are given without any
direct evidence and it remains unclear where the assumptions come from, or even whether
the situation of low English proficiency is a phenomenon specific to Japanese students. I
speculates that the observation does not properly represent the general phenomenon for a
number of reasons. Firstly, EFL in Japanese schools focuses on accuracy in English and the
students concentrate on grammatical accuracy rather than on fluency. As a result, Japanese
students are frequently under stress in using accurate English. Secondly, communicative
skills improve with language experiences, albeit to different degrees when non-native
14
speakers learn the skills in a natural process. Consequently, setting unattainable
expectations (e.g. fluency and accuracy in communicative English skills) would
de-motivate students. Further, an important goal of education is to promote basic skills
such as universal literacy and provide opportunities for successful experience rather than
failure. Sadly, the negative view of Japanese students‟ language success might be
attributable to attitudes that tend to put the student down.
Problems that researchers identify of EFL in Japan include: low TOEFL scores (Chujo and
Nishigaki, 2003; Hashimoto 2004; Takanashi, 2004; Schatz and Sullivan, 2007, Sullivan
and Schatz, 2009), a lack of motivation (e.g. Benson, 1991; Mori, 2004; Watanabe, 1996;
Kikuchi and Sakai, 2009; McVeigh, 2004,
Dornyei and Ushioda, 2009), low syntactical
(Takei and Fujiwara; 2002), phonological (Boyle; 1984, Broselow and Finer, 1991,
LoCastro, 2001 ), and communicative (Eckman et al. 1995, Gottlieb, 2008; Sewart, 2009)
skills. However, Davis (2003) explains that „…Whilst there is a demand for the traditional
ability to analyze, think critically, and work independently… this is accompanied by an
increasing demand for …transferable skill...communication, team working…and problem
solving.‟ This implies that English study for a global world is more complex and it requires
persistent learning. Internationalisation requires a new vernacular - English as a
communicative tool. The emancipation in the 21st century is not as easy as it appears to be.
The question is whether the problematic phenomenon that researchers‟ debate are inherent
in Japanese culture or not.
3. Contextual background
In Japan, before the age of six, most children attend at least one year of kindergarten.
Compulsory education begins at age six, and includes six years in elementary school and
three in middle school. 98.5% of junior high school graduates go to high school and 70 %
of them attend university (Makarova and Rodgers, 2004:51). In order to be qualified for
15
Japanese universities, applicants sit for written exams in February. It may be sufficient to
say that these educational experiences would determine the students‟ levels of self-esteem,
self-efficacies and even their future careers. Competition is vicious all the way, and some
students attend cramming class (hereafter called “Yobiko”) to prepare for the entrance
examinations. English is one of obligatory subjects in a common exam i.e. common
first-stage- exam and students use memory strategies to sit for the exams. The obvious
corollary is that the extensive use of proficiency tests of this kind has motivational
consequence for students and teachers.
In 1980s, in reaction to the global changes, the Japanese Education ministry (hereafter
MEXT) restarted a plan for curriculum reforms by declaring that communicative skills
among Japanese students are insufficient. In 1987, the Japanese Exchange and Teaching
Program (JET) began with the aim to improve communicative skills by inviting native
English speaking teachers (NETs) with an incentive of cultural exchange. In 2000, the
number of participants had grown from 848 participants from four countries in 1987 to
6.079 participants from 39 countries. In 2002, integrated learning ( 総合的な学習の時間)
was introduced, and foreign language activities as part of international understanding
became an option as one of the themes of integrated learning. In fact, many schools used
this subject for English. Consequently, the vocabulary taught at high school was reduced
from 1,200 - 2,100 in 1951 to 900 words in 1998, which is about 100 fewer than in the
previous curriculum (Honna and Takashita, 2003: 184). Amid emphasis on oral skills, an
increasing number of students from affluent financial backgrounds began attending tutorial
courses to compensate for gaps in their command of English. In this light, Makarova and
Rogers (2004:6) noted that English study has grown as an industry supported by dozens of
publishers, teachers, universities and schools as well as learners. With hindsight, it could
be argued that, in the light of these developments, the communicative approach might not
have been in the best interests of all students.
16
4.
The statement of the problem:
The selected references show how EFL is framed within the debates in Japan while little
has been done to discover what learners themselves think and what their explanations
might be. All of these bring us to the inevitable questions: What are the frustrations with
EFL in Japan? Why are Japanese students‟ English skills disputed at all times? Do the
Japanese students favour turning their frustrations inwards and keep silence?
The underlying assumption is that the students have authentic views that are shaped mostly
by their experiences. These experiences are deserving of systematic study.
The motivation behind this study is to break the opaque myths – about genetic inferiority -,
and review and support the students in careful ways. Brooks, (2012) calculated that more
than 40 percent of human action is governed by habit, not by actual decisions. Then,
Brooks (ibid.) added that we could change our habits by inserting different cues that are
reinforced by strong yearning for admiration and righteousness. In other words, the
motivational factors determine not just the goals toward which the students aspire but the
way they seek them out. It is important to get back to the whole pedagogical and strategic
discussion to provide what the students needs for their future in a global world.
5. The purpose of this thesis
This research aims at scrutinizing Japanese students‟ EFL experience as they see it
themselves and their views on EFL pedagogies. This aim is important to better understand
the issues described in the Literature Review below because it adds a new perspective.
This research lets EFL students speak their own minds on their learning experiences in
response to specific questions. The goal of this study is to capture important truths about
the students‟ EFL experience, and to expand our understanding of variables affecting EFL
at Japanese school by presenting qualitative evidence from Japanese university students. In
17
order to understand the situation of EFL in Japan, the present study poses the following
research questions, which were formulated by myself so as to investigate the student
perspective:
6. The research questions
1.
Main Research Question 1 - What are students‟ opinions about EFL
principles?
I asked students‟ views of the following English teaching principles without reference
to any political agenda. These principles are widely present in the Japanese education
system.
a) What are their views about the use of the Monolingual Method?
The use of the target language in the classroom has long been a dogma and this is the
standard expectation in Japanese schools even if not always fulfilled.
b) What are their views about advantage and disadvantages of NETs and
NNETs?
Native speakers (NETs) are invited to many Asian schools to improve students‟
English ability. I asked the students if they agree with the assumption that a native
speaker of the language can teach them appropriately.
c) What are their views about the belief „the earlier, the better‟?
The issue of early learning of English is perennial from political and general
perspectives. I asked about the starting age from socio cultural perspective.
d) What are their views about learning English as a lingua franca or Standard
English?
I asked if the students are happy with current learning goal of Standard English at
school or think it should include non-standard English as a lingua franca.
e) What are their views about the use of the Direct Method in English class?
18
The Direct Method was developed in response to learners‟ needs in communicative
situations i.e. oral and listening skills. This question aimed to explore how the next
generation in Japan viewed these pedagogical choices.
f) What are their views about the goal of EFL of the native speakers‟ norm and
the question of grammatical versus communicative language learning?
In this context, the traditional view of teaching the native norm of English is being
challenged. This section examines how Japanese students see their goal of EFL. The
role of English may vary according to learners‟ needs and the cultural context and the
schooling needs to be responsive to these needs.
g) What are their views about the relations between Language skills and
national interests?
Researchers argue about role of EFL as in its utilitarian value or national interests (i.e.
economic) rather than educational purpose. While the spread of the English language
around the world has led to changes in historical, cultural, ecological, educational,
socio-political, and psychological perspectives, the students were asked if they think
English language skill would affect national power balances.
Main Research Question 2: What kinds of experiences do Japanese students
have in EFL?
The question was intended to reveal Japanese university students‟ EFL experience at
school and outside schools to ascertain the realities of EFL in Japan.
h) What are their views about the perceived low level of Japanese students‟
language skills?
This question asked the students‟ belief about low English attainments at Japanese
school.
i) What are the students‟ levels of, their attitudes towards and their
opportunities for learning English?
In relation to the previous question, I first asked the students‟ self-evaluation of the
19
English skills (i.e. the most/least proficient English skills) and their opportunities to
develop the skills at school and outside school.
j) How did you learn these skills?
This question was designed ask how the students succeed/fail to achieve their micro
English skills.
k) What type of English skills do you further want to learn?
This question aimed to ask students‟ English skill that they further want to improve
or need?
l) What kind of change do you want in EFL?
This question was set to ask the students‟ suggestion to improve EFL in Japan.
7. Overview of the research
Many research papers describe the relationship between variables e.g. teaching
methods, cultural traits, and psycho-linguistic factors (e.g. motivation) and linguistic
performance. This study utilizes natural inquiry - open-ended interviews. As Denzen
and Lincoln (2008:10) noted, the lack of such inquiry in general might be partly
because the academic resistance to qualitative research or the politics might be
embedded in this field of discourse. This study posits that it is difficult to understand
differences in students‟ perceptions and opinions from quantitative inquiries.
8. The originality of this research
This research is not the first to examine student perceptions of EFL aspects, but the
first study to take a holistic view of EFL teaching and to use student voice in Japan as
a major source. Previous studies have all focused on factors such as integrated skills
approaches (Sasaki and Hirose 2006; Watanabe 1996; Benson 1991; Mori 2004; Baker
2011; Makarova et al. 2004) different communicative methods (Sullivan and Schatz
2009; Saito and Ebsworth 2008; Busch 2006; Chihara and Oiler 2006; Jackson 2002,
Kobayashi 2001; Cheng 2000; Hinenoya and Gatbonton 2000; Dwyer and Murphy
20
1996) and the role of the teachers (Sakui and Cowei 2011; Stapleton 2002; Gray 1998).
The present study aims to take a holistic view of EFL and uses the student voice in
Japan as the focus of analysis.
9.
The organization of the thesis
This thesis consists of six chapters with the following topics.
1) This first chapter lays out the research background, research context, aim of this
study and goal of our inquiry.
2) The second chapter discusses literature, which analyzes the EFL situation in
Japanese schools and the nature of difficulties with five dimensions (teaching,
educational psychology, culture in language students‟ view, environment, and
change).
3) The third chapter provides an overview of the research methodology, which
includes reliability, validity, and ethical issues.
4) The fourth chapter describes the data analysis.
5) The fifth chapter is devoted to the discussion of the results of data and conclusions
and implementation questions.
21
II. Literature review
“How do researchers define and explain problems of English learning in
Japanese Universities?”
Introduction
This chapter looks into how researchers see EFL in Japan in the globalized context of
language learning. It will address four main areas as follows
1. General evaluation of language learning in Japan
a) Communicative skills
b) Pronunciation
c) TOEFL
2.
Instruction
d) Teacher centred instruction
e) The focal skills (FS) approach
f) The direct translation method
g) The grammar - translation method
3. Environment
h) EFL in the education system
i) University entrance examination
j) Fear of internationalization
k) Curriculum reform
4. Personal factors
l) Motivation
m) Attitudes
n) Reticence
22
1. General evaluation of language learning in Japan
In the following section, I will look at the literature describing the pedagogical principles
that are often adapted in EFL inside Japan (and that are also found elsewhere). I will also
review research that explains how personal factors affect EFL attainment.
a) Communicative skills
As described in the introduction to this thesis, in popular perception, Japanese university
students are said to have low English communicative skills relative to other countries, and
media/researchers treat the situation as in need of attention. The economist and widely
acknowledged commentator on Japanese culture Kwan (2002) wrote;
Most Japanese fare poorly in English, as widely acknowledged by both foreigners
and the Japanese themselves.
Kwan added that Japanese poor performance in English communication creates diplomatic
problems. Kwan‟s negative view represents two groups, namely the academic and the
commercial worlds.
b) Pronunciation
LoCastro (2001:77) reported that the English by Japanese speakers in classes were easy to
understand and friendly, but unpleasant to listen to. Eckman et al. (1995:49) agreed with
LaCastro (ibid.) in that English spoken by Japanese students is problematic. He added that
Japanese speakers repeat the main clauses and they lack contrast of /r/ and /l/ (ibid: 275).
Then, he concluded that the deviant English by Japanese speakers would interfere with
global communication in its interpretability. It appears that, although the presence of
phonological features might affect interpretability to different degrees, it would not be a
phenomenon limited to Japanese students. In a similar vein, Takanashi (2004:1) noted that
Japanese students‟ attitude toward English mismatches with their oral performance.
c) TOEFL scores
23
Takanashi (2004) commented on the problems of Japanese students‟ constant low TOEFL
scores and their insufficient communicative skills. Takanashi (ibid.) gave several possible
explanations for this. First, TOEFL education starts late in Japan (at junior high school);
second, compared to other countries, the total number of class hours of English per week is
low; and to add to it, EFL classes are large in Japan. It implies that the teachers cannot
devote sufficient time to individual EFL learners. Takanashi (ibid.) added that
communicative modes in Japan (e.g. indirectness) have significant effects on students‟
motivation and Takahashi recommends utilizing the preferred modes of communication in
the English language. It implies that language learning involves language users‟ sensitivity
to social and contextual factors such as formality, status, power, and social distance.
Similarly, Schatz and Sullivan (2007) described the low TOEFL scores of Japanese
students, namely the second lowest among Asian countries (approximately 27 countries)
and
examined
the
relationship
between
language
proficiency
and
national
identities/language attitudes by using a survey of 381 Japanese university students
majoring in computer science in Fukushima. Previous studies that found that students with
strong national identification have less positive attitudes toward the foreign language
studies (Schatz and Sullivan 2007:15). Schatz and Sullivan‟s study is echoed in McVeigh
(2004) in saying that the goal of foreign language study in Japanese higher education is a
form of collective desire to please someone else ( i.e. the corporate culture, or national
collectiveness). This touches on the issue of motivation of the learners, which I will
address in a later section.
In sum, the researchers contend that the factors that impact English skills attainments
include late start of EFL instruction, too few dedicated hours in the curriculum, negative
attitudes due to misplaced nationalism, and unproductive source of motivation. As
researchers contend, there might also be some problems in the Japanese EFL learning
programs. However, it might mean that Japanese universities share a similar concern to
24
other countries with increasing number of unmotivated students. The next section will look
at instruction that Japanese schools adapt.
2. Instruction
Byram (2008) said that the aim of acquiring a foreign language has changed from
understanding cultures of great civilizations to being able to use language for daily
communication and interaction with people from other countries. From this perspective,
researchers have paid attention to English acquisition theories, which place emphasis on
communication. Hereafter, I will see how language teaching has changed from teacher
centeredness to learner-centred approaches - i.e. to communicative approaches.
d) Teacher cantered instruction
Teacher-centred instruction in language classes in Japanese schools has attracted the
attention of researchers. Matsuura et al. (2004) studied instructional preference by the
teachers (N=50) and students (N=660) at universities throughout Japan. His study reported
that the students prefer teacher-centred instruction from Japanese-born English teachers
who use some Japanese in EFL classes.
Concretely, Kito and Hamada (2008) emphasized integrating skills by recommending
adapting an approach based on students‟ strengths. The pedagogical recommendation has
an explicit learning goal with prescriptive exercises. Japanese learners above all learn
written language from a teacher-centred methodology.
The subsequent section looks at
the effects of skills-based instruction.
e) The focal skills (FS) approach
Eckman and Iversion (1995:29) explained that the basic idea underlying the FS approach is
that the macro-skills - listening, reading, writing, and speaking - form complex and shifting
patterns of functional interrelationship during the course of L2 acquisition especially when
25
the target language is also the language of instruction. At a given stage of development, a
skill may be dependent or autonomous. Dependent skills can be sub-divided into focal and
emergent skills and will continue to develop without special attention through normal
language use. A focal skill needs a focus on intensive efforts to develop it as rapidly as
possible. In this section, we will describe what approaches are used in Japan and how
macro skills appear.
Saegusa and Gay (1988) looked into the Japanese students‟ low listening skill, and
administered an English proficiency test for the purpose of comparing the grammar skill
and listening skill of 265 students at a Japanese college and compared the result to 677
non-native English speakers in the United States in six groups. (Midwestern community
college, university affiliated language institutes attendants, French – speaking Canadian
students, and others). The result included the highest scores of 94 to the lowest of 16 with
mean scores of 41.40 for listening proficiency and 62.68 for composition. It gave support
for the widely accepted theory that Japanese students are better in grammar but weak in
spoken language skills including listening. Saegusa (ibid) attributes the cause of difficulty
in listening comprehension to English pronunciation, intonation, vocabulary, or structure
and emphasizes a need for comprehension practice at normal native speaker English speed,
which is approximately 150 to 200 words per minute (ibid: 13). There is an indication that
communication skills need to be given more emphasis.
As for attitudes to these skills, Matsuura, Fujida, and Mahoney (2004:477) said that more
than 60 % of students wish listening and speaking skills to be stressed in EFL, whereas
only 34 % of teachers indicated likewise. Ultimately, listening is the first step in
communication and their research has implications for this study.
For writing, Sasaki and Hirose (1996) investigated factors (e.g. writing strategies, L1
writing, L2 proficiency, instructional background) that might influence Japanese students‟
26
English writing from 70 freshmen at a Japanese university by distributing post/pre writing
questionnaires and utilizing an English proficiency test (i.e. CELT) as well as a translation
task from L1 to L2. He reported that the students‟ English proficiency and their L1 writing
ability influenced their English writing. He explained that good writers‟ pay more attention
to overall organization. This meant that L1 writing and L2 proficiency influenced each
other.
Constanzo (2009:107) said that, while research in English teaching has traditionally
distinguished writing skills from speaking, a new approach considers writing as more
anti-social and the spoken discourse as a social activity. From this, he (ibid.: 114) cited that
the ideal language for social and communicative purposes involves students working
together on dialogues of written work and negotiating meanings through integrated
activities (e.g. group works or pair works). Then, students would learn to elaborate ideas in
speaking which bridges discourse into thoughts. The above literatures showed how
speaking skills are interrelated to other English skills. In his account, Clouet (2006: 55)
points out that language performance requires not only language skills but also
understanding of the socio-cultural aspects of the target language speakers. For learner
centred approach - i.e. activity based approach; he described the importance of materials.
He recommended using primary texts (e.g. novels, film), authentic materials (e.g.
advertisement, technological resources) and literary texts. This study will also look for
what the students say about teaching materials. The next section will look at the directtranslation method, which is the most, frequent approach used to improve reading skills at
Japanese school.
f) The Direct Translation Method
The direct translation method is translation back and forth from L1 to L2, which is
prevalent in Japanese schools. According to Stevick (1996: 160), the direct translation
method treats language as an object before it becomes a medium of communication. Then,
27
what to say is less important than how correctly I say it. Kasuya (2000) said that Japanese
students have not learned figurative use of lexis because they learn vocabulary by the
direct translation method. He suggested that, since English has a wide range of alternative
terms for core words, it is difficult to replace a word by direct translation methods (Jullian,
2000: 38). Thus, the word-to-word translation gives a syntactic problem, which can impair
meaning of the text or understanding in intercultural situations.
In this light, Jullian (2000) pointed out two learning problems arising from a lack of lexical
knowledge; first on the reception side, learning would fail due to a lack of comprehension,
and on the production side, speakers have a limited ways to use lexical knowledge to
convey meaning. Whether aiming at accuracy or fluency, Jullian (2000) recommends
teaching paradigmatic and systematic relations i.e. using concordance to improve
comprehension. This study also asked the students‟ familiarities in using concordance and
few students utilize the program.
Similarly, Halliday and Hasan (1985:3) described the weakness of the direct translation
method in that
There is one limitation its emphasis on the concept of the sign (i.e. lexis) which
has tended to be seen in isolation, as a thing in itself, which exists first in and of
itself before coming to be related to other signs.
They suggested that the meaning existing in texts cannot be separated from its context;
thereby any communication that does not take into account its addressee and wider context
may be meaningless.
g) The grammar translation method
Similarly, the grammar translation method is relevant in Japan, which requires students to:
1) remember rules exactly; 2) use these rule with other grammatical sentences; and 3)
remember „which “what” could be used in the same set of whereas‟ (Stevick 1996:211-3).
28
The method focuses on accuracy rather than fluency, which, is suitable to apply to the
university exams.
3. Environment
In the following part, we will now consider the effect of teaching in Japan.
As research shows, multiple approaches to language learning would be more successful in
terms of the language acquisition of students, than EFL courses offering, and utilizing, a
reduced number of options, or strategies, for language learning. On the other hand, Gillette
(1994:210) notes that the learners‟ goals and L2 success are predisposed by learners‟ social
environment and the use and value of English in their communities. Only ultimate goals
may allow students to withstand the difficulties and get themselves off the negative spike
they are impaled on. There arise inevitable conflicts between academic goal of students
and social needs. In the following, we will describe the educational environment in Japan.
h) EFL in the education system
In Japan, compulsory education begins at age six and includes six years in elementary
school and three in middle school. Since 2008, English language was introduced once a
week from fifth graders at elementary schools without assessment, and students learn
English as a compulsory subject at junior high school. After the completion of compulsory
education, 98.5% of all students go to high school and 70 % of them attend university
(Makarova & Rodgers 2004:51). Until entering university, in 2000, about 4 million junior
high school students, and 4 million senior high school students were studying English and
approximately, 600,000 university students were enrolling in English language classes
(Makarova and Rogers 2004:6). In line with the Ministry of Education (hereafter MEXT)
guideline in 2002, students are studying to improve their communicative skills by
increasing vocabulary and improving listening. These changes are reflected in curriculum
29
and examined in university entrance examinations. In focusing on receptive skills in EFL,
Krashen‟s (1982) natural approach is officially promoted as a way to cultivate
communicative skills in English (ibid.: 2004: 90). This approach resulted in the following
three outcomes. First, listening activities increased at secondary school level. Second,
listening comprehension tests were introduced in a number of university entrance
examinations, including the National Centre Tests in 2006; and finally the score allocation
of listening tests in the widely used standardized test (STEP) has risen from 31% to 41 %.
However, despite political efforts to improve EFL, the various reforms have not been
perceived as successful.
Takahashi (2004:6) wrote that, in 2000, around 95% of junior high school graduates in
Japan advanced to senior high school, 70 % of whom went on to universities or colleges.
Recognizing this increasing number of students with a mix of educational needs for
attendance, higher education cannot meet all the individual needs/goals, which vary at the
beginning point of their entry. In addition, failing to recognize varying abilities among
Japanese university students is seen as problematic (Cagen 2002). The following section
will look at research investigating the significance of university entrance examinations.
i) University entrance examination
Benson (1991) surveyed over 300 freshmen at a private Japanese university in order to
assess their attitudes towards English and their learning of the English language. He
suggested that there is mismatch between the memorized knowledge students obtained by
preparing for entrance examinations and practical usage of that knowledge. In addition, the
study also assessed levels of students‟ exposure to English, their self-assessment of English
skills, and the students‟ motivation for studying English. The results showed that those
students who had little exposure to English, and whose self-rating of their own skills was
low, had low morale and little motivation for learning English and little success in learning
30
English. Benson (ibid.) also suggested that English was seen as useful for a selection of
international situations, but that English was not seen as useful for domestic and local
situations, with only those students who saw themselves as needing to go abroad being
motivated for dedicating themselves to studying English. This shows that EFL and
internalization are interdependent.
In regard to vocabulary, JACET listed 8000 frequency words to prepare for the exams.
However, Jullian (2000) noted that active English vocabulary is made up of the most
frequent words. The conclusion is that students try to memorize a large vocabulary, which
is indispensable for successful goals of entrance exams while communicative goals require
fewer words.
Concomitantly, Kobayashi (2001) focused on English language education within the
Japanese social and educational context by looking at Japanese high school students and
university-preparatory high schools in Japan. In doing so, a semi-structured questionnaire
was handed out to 66 Japanese university-bound high school students, with the results from
this questionnaire suggesting that the internationalization of the Japanese society, and its
association with the English language, helps Japanese students to develop an orientation in
order to communicate with native speakers of English. It was argued, however, that students'
orientation towards an international perspective is somewhat dampened by English classes
that are generally devoid of communication with native English speakers and that are focused
on examinations. It is also dampened by Japanese society outside their English classroom
experiences, which, generally, lacks any practical need for English, thus belittling the
studying of English as a practical endeavour. Kobayashi (ibid.) found that many Japanese
students had only their university entrance examination in mind in studying English; and
31
very few students admitted to wanting to learn English because they were likely to need it for
international communication. Many students admitted that they saw no link between the
English they were learning and potential communication with native English speakers, and
finally, many students highlighted that they believed that „broken‟ spoken English would be
sufficient for any communications they needed to make in English with native English
speakers. These findings suggest that, perhaps, the pedagogical approach to English language
learning is misplaced, with the findings suggesting that the English language is taught, and
therefore understood, as an abstract concept to Japanese students.
Makarova and Rodgers 2004:41) agreed with Watanabe (1996) and Kobayashi (2001) and
gave the underlying reasons for failure: 1) teachers‟ lack of confidence, 2) cultural
expectations of pupils, parents, and college and 3) teachers‟ beliefs. Makarova (ibid.: 42)
continued that the valuable advantage of EFL in Japan lies in its intangible aspect, namely,
in its hidden and non-utilitarian effect on the mind. In sum, we have seen that researchers
identify the following key factors in the system as a cause of problems: dominance of
exams, lack of practical use, questionable role of vocabulary learning, and the lack of
attention to communicative skills. According to these researchers, there are problems in the
education system in a global era. A lack of English skills may be disadvantageous to
enjoying the benefits of globalization, and so the next section will discuss how attitudes
toward internationalization affect English study.
i) Fear of internationalization
Cogan, Torney-Purta, and Andersen (1988) studied the knowledge and attitudes necessary
for global leadership, and investigated the international knowledge and awareness among
50 freshmen and 50 seniors‟ students from public universities in the U.S.A. and Japan. The
result shows considerable differences between the U.S. freshmen and seniors whereas
32
small differences were found between Japanese freshmen and seniors. The conclusion of
the study is that Japanese students‟ progress is small during their four years of higher
education and, confirms the widespread belief that the Japanese university graduates are
dysfunctional learners (ibid.: 296-297). They (ibid.: 297) contended that if a goal of
Japanese education is to meet challenging needs of globalization, the internationalization
of education has failed. Broadly, Cogan et al. (ibid.) called for changing the learning
context instead of changing the students.
As seen above, EFL at Japanese school essentially focuses on learning lexis and syntax to
improve reading skills for university, rather than communicative skills in the context of
globalization. However, recently, MEXT is taking steps to encourage students to improve
communicative skills in English particularly to secure national security (e.g. political and
economical interests).
Globally, with the shift from written to spoken language in English
study as an international language, there are a number of changes taking place in Japanese
school. The next section will consider the curriculum reform in Japan.
k) Curriculum reform
Byram (2008:29) suggested that the current Japanese goal of “cultivate Japanese with
English abilities” aims to provide English communicative skills for national interests in
economy, which is limited to political incentive. This raises the question whether this aim
coincides with that of the learners.
In relation to cultural influences on curriculum, Weinstein (2002:255) stated, “Obstacles to
reaching higher (levels) lie in contradictions between classroom effort and the large
culture of the school.” Paradoxically, in the competitive educational environment in Japan,
one of the motivations for students may be to protect their self-worth from their friends and
to preserve their social identity. As for text reforms, school textbooks are revised with an
33
increase of dialogical texts to aim for speaking skills. Consequently, vocabularies taught at
school are remarkably reduced from 1,200 - 2,100 in 1951 to 900 words in 1998, which are
about 100 fewer than in the previous curriculum. Woolfolk, Hughes, and Walkup,
(2008:68) said that the average six-year old native speaker has a vocabulary of 8,000 to
14,000 words growing to about 40,000 by age 11. The problem arises that the students
learn relatively few words to express themselves.
In summary, this section described the interrelationship between globalization and EFL
curriculum. In the following section, research on socio-psychology factors will be
reviewed.
4. Personal factors
As the above research stated, individual differences in motivation, reticence and attitudes
influence school learning. This section will examine how individual factors in psychology
affect learning. Ushioda (2006:151) contended that there is growing recognition of the
impact of globalization on language learning motivation, and theoretical refinement of the
concept of motivation. This section starts with motivation in EFL.
Nicholls (1989) asserted that motivational inequality is prevalent in school. Woolfork
(2006) agreed with Nicholls (ibid) that this motivation inequality has increased rather than
decreased in the years since it was first noted. For example, some students with optimum
motivation have an edge such as adaptive attitudes and intrinsic interests while others
failed to adapt strategies, goal setting, and self-monitoring. Notably, Butler and Newman
(1995) said that the much of the widely reported school failure is a result of students failing
to expend the efforts to do high-quality work. It means that success or failure has been
attributed to individual accounts i.e. purpose or emotional reactions. Seeing affective
34
factors as volatile, what we are concerned with here is motivation inequality. What are
Japanese students‟ motivations to study English?
l) Motivation
Gardner and Lambert (1959) pioneered the study of language learning and motivation. In
the earlier study, they focused on integrative orientation of language learning and aptitudes
of learners. Then, during 1970, the socio-psychological theories of motivation have
illustrated communicative needs and language development for European integration
(Ushida 2006:148). The social psychological models on motivation described
communicative needs and language development among migrant populations in Europe
(ibid). During 1990s, research attention has increasingly focused on classroom
motivational process (ibid.:149). For example, Tremblay and Gardner (1995 in Schumann
1997:95) considered that motivation needs to be reappraised as a direct influence on EFL
achievement. They considered that adaptive attribution toward L2 culture would influence
motivation, language learning attitudes, and, resultant language proficiency. Then, Dornyei
(2001: 22) linked motivation and expectancy-value theories such as individuals‟
“expectancy of success” - the value the individual attaches to success on that task (ibid:
20); and “self-efficacy” - “people‟s judgment of their capabilities to carry out certain tasks
(ibid.: 22)”. It means that goal-setting theory is compatible with expectancy-value theories
in that commitment is seen to be enhanced when people believe that achieving the goal is
possible (ibid.: 26). In this case, orientation is content-dependent determined by “what to
learn.”
Subsequently, Gardner (2007) focused on two types of motivation; 1) individual
motivation for language acquisition and 2) classroom motivation. He said that educational
and cultural contexts having influence on the degree of integrative motivation (e.g. positive
attitudes towards the learning situation and 2) the integrative motivation toward L2 culture.
35
„Integrative orientation‟ here means having a personal interest in the people and culture
represented by the other group.
In contrast, Ushida (2006:151) argued that, due to the spread of English in global era as a
lingua franca, there is a problem of applying the concept of „integrative orientation‟
because there is no specific target reference group of speakers in LF situations. Then, she
(2006:149) said that theoretical framework of motivation theories needs to be reappraised
to focus more on the socio-psychological issue of intelligibility and identify. Ushida (ibid.:
158) contended that motivation of language study has an overtly political dimension,
which appears not only in language choice but also to the day-to-day processes of
engagement with language learning.
Bernajus and Wilson (2009) investigated Spanish students‟ interrelationships between their
achievements and teachers/students motivations by using six determiners in questionnaires.
Bernaus et. al. (ibid.:31) reported that the high level of achievement was related to high
level of integrative motivation and parental encouragement to learn English. This can be
explained by the fact that language learning is different from other subjects studied in that
the contexts of EFL has fewer factors in common with their culture and students‟ attitudes
toward target culture influence their learning activities. Those findings are informative for
our study to understand how students see their experiences in EFL classes. It implies that
EFL is influence by individual factors (e.g. personality) rather than classroom factor.
Turning to the Japanese context, Makarove (2004) contended that the low levels of English
proficiency at Japanese schools are also related to the low level of motivation. Her
contention is that motivation is not exclusively intrinsic, but if optimum motivation is to
36
happen, learning takes place by “its environment i.e. milieu”. This is supported by Marhr
and Midgley (1996 in Shunk, Patrick, and Meece 2008:350) who suggested that a major
priority of EFL is to build a classroom climate where students support each other for
learning and care about their classmates.
Mori (2004) looked at the relationship between students' motivation and attitudes toward
reading outside school, how well they read English, and how well they performed in the
English language. Reading proficiency was assessed by a questionnaire and reading reports
were collected from 100 first-year students at a women‟s university in Japan. The results
showed that the students‟ motivation and their reading habits were indicative of students‟
English proficiency. He suggested that the absence of interaction with native English
speakers is not as problematic as was expected, given the fact that high levels of motivation
and good study habits predicted high levels of English proficiency, even in the absence of
interactions with native English speakers. Consequently, Mori (ibid.) agreed with Watanabe
(1996) in that internal factors (e.g. motivation) have effects on students‟ performance in
that these traits are difficult to change (Mori ibid.: 75).
LoCastro (2001) looked at individual differences in second language acquisition among
university students learning English at a Japanese university well known for their language
studies in Tokyo with the usage of group discussions, essays, and language awareness
worksheets. Interestingly, our study also includes a student of this university as a
participant. LoCastro (ibid.) suggested that positive attitudes towards learning English
provided by students do not match their language-related behaviours. She found that many
students professing their love of learning English do not act in a manner consistent with this,
i.e., not studying or making any effort to improve their English language proficiency. When
37
pushed, the majority of students who profess their love for the English language and for
learning English admitted that they need to learn English in order to advance along their
chosen career pathway, or because they want to study abroad and so need to know how to
speak English, with very few students showing any genuine motivation for learning the
English language per se. LoCastro (ibid.) suggested that the students‟ motivation to study
English is extrinsic while attitudes toward internationalization is intrinsic in quality. It is an
interesting question how this will impact on proficiency in English in a global era.
In sum, this section described motivation literature from different perspectives. First, the
literature described socio-psychological motivation, which focused on motivation in
individual contents. Then, research focused on motivation in English classes, which
determines not only the goals of language but self-efficacy, and attitudes toward English
study. Then, education theories have redirected attention to socio-cultural dimensions in
that the concept of motivation has expanded to include social identities.
In the next section, I will discuss the role of students‟ attitudes toward English speakers
and the target countries.
m) Attitudes
Burr (2003: 131) explained that an „attitude‟ refers to a coherent and relatively stable
orientation on an issue or object and there will be high degree of coherence in what is said.
The meaning of „attitudes‟ in this study is taken from Sarnoff (1970 in Benson 1991:35) as
“a disposition to react favourably or unfavourably to a class of objects.” Stephan (1987)
was the first to propose a detailed model of how exposure influences attitudes and
behaviours. Stephan argued that social factors (e.g. social structure) exert their nature on
the interaction, which is expressed as stereotype attitudes. According to Dornyei et al.
(2005 in Csizer and Komos 2008:170), an amount of exposure to target language will help
to promote positive attitudes up to a certain point, but beyond that level, it works against
38
positive inter-cultural relations. There are various ways of interpreting why this is. For
example, in Japan, in which direct contacts with native speakers is rare and short in
duration, it is unlikely that negative attitudes will be reduced. Similarly, Lyall (2000)
contended that students‟ perceptions of language study are important in determining the
success of learning. Maggi-Lieg (2009) explored the Japanese university students‟
perceptions of native English speakers and reported that, although their perception
appeared to be positive for the most part, the stress or nervousness in talking to foreigners
appeared to be related to their English ability rather than their negative perceptions of
foreigners.
Chihara and Oller (2006) investigated Japanese students‟ attitudes toward EFL, toward
themselves, towards other Japanese students learning English, towards native English
speakers, towards travel to an English speaking country, and finally towards learning
English. A total one hundred twenty three students at Osaka YMCA participated in the
study. The study utilized 1) cloze test from Oller, Hudson, and Liu (1977: 2) an attitude
questionnaire modified by Oller et al. and 3) self-rating reports of English skills. Then,
these measurements of attitudes along with these variables were related to EFL proficiency.
The results showed a weak correlation between attitudes and proficiency, suggesting that it
is not only attitude that has a bearing on the student‟s attainment in the English language.
He concluded that the relationship between attitudes and proficiency in a target language
might be indirect and therefore weak, or that the attitude measures were invalid suggesting
that language proficiency might depend on classroom environment rather than attitudes.
This contradictory result might arise from individual difference such as language exposure.
It suggested that the interrelationship between English study and learners‟ attitudes is
unclear.
39
Gardner (2007) has developed measurement of variables that affect students‟ learning
concerning 1) motivation, 2) language anxiety, 3) integrativeness, 4) instructional
orientations, 5) parental encouragement, and 6) attitudes toward learning situation in six
countries; Japan, Spain, Croatia, Poland, Romania, and Brazil. The result reports amazing
consistencies in that motivation is correlated the most to their marks whereas attitudes
toward the learning situation are least correlated so that teachers have least effects on
students‟ performance.
In short, there are conflicting views whether learners‟ attitudes are linked to appearance of
English skills or not and we await more empirical evidence.
n) Reticence
McVeigh (2004: 212) considers the English problem in Japan at the national and historical
level and wrote that:
It is not unusual for Japanese people to apologize for their lack of English-speaking
ability
McVeigh (ibid) draws from his 15-year living experience in Japan and ascribed a hindrance
to language learning to: resistance by nationalist elements; the unfocused mission of higher
education towards the corporate culture; and a lack of academic motivation which impairs
performance (ibid.: 223). McVeigh‟s discussion of pedagogy recommends a natural
approach as opposed to formal learning where most Japanese students sit down and read
authentic materials with the dominant goal of passing university entrance examinations.
Makorova (2004:24) joined McVeigh‟s claims,
One of the typical problem” in EFL classes in Japan “is the inability to overcome
their shyness and the fear that they will make fools of themselves in front of
others.
40
According to Nozaki, 1993 (in Makarova and Rogers 2004:50-57), Western teachers
working in Japanese universities ascribed Japanese students‟ passiveness to Confucianism.
By contrast, Rogers (1977:70) said, “the students are best governed by being kept in
constant state of fear.” In the next part, literature focuses on the relationship between level
of reticence (e.g. passiveness) in English class and English proficiency.
Cheng (2000) described the explanation of cultural attributes of Asian societies being cited
as the main causes for these reticent and passive behaviours as an over-generalization. He
noted that if some Asian students are quieter than expected in certain classes, the causes of
this are likely to be situation-specific and not due to cultural factors. Cheng concluded that
interpretations of reticence and activity/passivity that are based entirely on cultural attributes
are not an accurate diagnosis for the problems arising in English learning by Asian students.
Jackson (2002) assessed why Asian students hold back from participating in discussions in
the classroom setting and considered what can be done to increase their involvement in
lessons. In order to better understand the reasons for the Asian students' reticence, Jackson
used surveys, interviews with lecturers and student, as well as observations with analysis of
video footage from actual classroom settings at Hong Kong university business course. The
result indicated that, many students wish to break the tie with negative factors. A mix of
socio-cultural (e.g. fear of losing face) and educational factors (e.g. teacher-centred
learning habit) played a significant role in determining the level of students‟ interaction in
classrooms. The recommendations from the research were that specific, targeted strategies
need to be utilized by English language teachers of Asian students, in order to overcome the
reticence of some students and to increase levels of active participation in classrooms, in
order to improve English language proficiency in Asian (particularly Japanese) students.
41
Jackson found little evidence for a major effect of culture on English language learning in
Asian students, rather finding that reticence is present in only some Asian students and that
this can interfere with their degree of, and success in, classroom learning. The important
thing is for teachers to understand students‟ perception of the classes. In this case, it is
important to note that Laney (2003) explains introverted persons take a longer time to
overcome inherited reticence. Laney says, “Introversion is a natural characteristic
occurring in about 25 % of the population”, and the next section will look at this factor in
more details.
Busch (2006) focused on internal factors and their relation to English learning by Japanese
students, looking at how positioning along the introversion-extraversion scale affects
English language learning and the EFL proficiency of Japanese students. Busch formed a
hypothesis that extraverted students are expected to attain a higher proficiency in English
because extroverts take more advantage than introverts to take opportunities to have input
in English and practice the language with native speakers. In this account, in order to test
this hypothesis, 80 junior college students and 105 adult students at YMCA night school in
age from 17 to 69 took a standardized English test, completed a personality questionnaire,
oral interviews, and completed another questionnaire on their impressions of English and
English learning. The results from the analyses of these questionnaires showed that
extraverts are not always proficient in English, with extraversion having a significantly
negative correlation with pronunciation and introverts having higher scores in reading and
grammar. With respect to the cultural factors predominant in Japanese society, Busch
concluded that, the tendency for Japanese students is to be reserved when faced with native
English speakers; but a mixture of introverted/extraverted students is found within English
classes not containing native English speakers; and that care should be taken when native
English speakers are invited in to classes. In addition, in terms of ensuring that lessons are
42
managed in such a way, all students can benefit from EFL experience with native speakers.
Busch summarized that cultural factors and individual characteristics can have a major
impact on the ways students learn and the learning that students take away from classes.
More broadly, for Takanashi (2004), the formality and politeness in the use of English (e.g.
teachers- students‟ relationship) greatly affect EFL practices in Japan. It might imply the
difficulties of pair-work or group presentation. In his account, Dornyei (2001: 34) wrote
that teachers should be an emotional amplifier of the students as a-motivator or
de-motivator. However, according to Holiday (2010: 176), from cosmopolitanism views of
the world today, the social structure of nations does not necessarily define and confine
cultural reality.
Summary
The literature has suggested that language learning/teaching reflects inequality partly
because the level of proficiency is influenced by psychological factors and the environment.
These discussions are important in terms of structuring this study and in the construction of
the methodology for the research, given that certain aspects of EFL environments can affect
how students are taught, and learn, English. I now give a summary of the factors that
literature mentioned above.
a) I first reviewed teaching methodology that are employed in Japan and outside
Japan
b) Second, I reviewed EFL environment and showed how cultural isolation from
the English-speaking world and entrance examination have been interrelated to
EFL.
c) Third, I discussed the nature and contents of students‟ EFL motivation, and the
43
lack thereof.
This was an attempt to investigate the students‟ motivations and attitudes to see whether the
relationship between English skills and national power is disputed.
It appears that using cultural debates to influence the political debate on EFL would be
highly inappropriate; for what it is worth, the strategy would likely to be ineffective to
explain the myth of low English skills in Japan. As literature showed, there were gaps in
the research because the most of research in Japan has been studied by questionnaires and
tests and talked about cultural characteristics e.g. reticence etc. However, nobody has asked
students for their explanations. This study aims to fill the void.
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III. Research Methodology
Introduction
The literature review suggested that there are conflicting views of EFL in Japan. Japanese
students are thought to have more limited ability to learn English compared to other
countries, and changes in EFL approaches and principles show little effect in improving
their English proficiency. This study examines students‟ EFL experiences and their views
on English teaching principles and this chapter presents a map of the research methodology
of the present study.
1. Research Paradigms
Before providing details of the study, a brief account of research paradigms provides some
of the background thinking that informed the approach taken.
A „paradigm‟ is a world view that represents how we think about the world. However, a
paradigm is not be proven but deeply embedded in the socialization of the adherents and
practitioners. Research inquiry has passed through a number of „paradigm eras‟;
pre-positivist, positivist and post-positivist, and in each era, inquiry is guided in quite
different ways (Lincoln and Guba: 1985:15-20). The positivist era began early in the
nineteenth century, primarily in France and Germany (Lincoln and Guba 1985:19). John
Stuart Mill published “A System of Logic” in 1843, in which he illustrated political,
economic, and social revolutions of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth country.
Habermas (Cohen, Manion, and Morrison 2007:10) described five aspects of “positivist”
views; objectivity, hypothetic-deductive theory, external law-like relations, the use of
formal language, separation of facts from meaning, and the opposition to different
45
interpretations. In essence, positivism favours logical and mathematical data to verify data.
However, critiques of positivism state that the problem of positivism is its determination to
explain human phenomena (Cohen et al. 2007). Paradigm shifts in academic research is
linked to changes in social and political dimensions. For instance, whether an issue (e.g.
death penalty) is un/ethical or i/legal are relevant to culture contexts. In short, a paradigm
shift would influence the whole society - i.e. in terms of what counts as „lawfulness‟.
In contrast, „post-positivism‟ considered that reality is holistically constructed and any
inquiry reflects the time
and its context. In this regard, as a way of construing
post-positivism ideas, Schwartz and Ogilvy (1979 in Lincoln et al. 1985:51-56) outlined
seven characteristics of a new paradigm (i.e. post-positivism) to interpret reality as follows:
1) Reality interacts with environments: 2) Different perspectives exist side by side which
do not have a real order: 3) Reality is interconnected by different perspectives that create
three-dimensional understandings: 4) The future is unpredictable and ambiguous because it
is conditional to a nature: 5) The idea of causality has changed from a linear to mutual
conception and 6) Natural inquiry is open to change: and lastly, 7) Observation provides a
partial picture and does not yield a complete result. In this regard, Lincoln et al.
(1985:61-2) defined „post-positivism‟ in that the human being is internally and externally
connected with other people around them, and that human nature is unpredictable and
changes take place suddenly. It means that reality is dynamic and varies by individual
perceptions.
Given a lack of coherence in understanding the EFL phenomenon in Japan, the aim of this
study is to fill the gaps of existing research findings. To do so, this study will apply the
post-positivism in that I will see how the students‟ views are different from others by the
46
natural inquiry. The next section will describe the research method of this study.
2. Research method
Quantitative studies emphasize the measurement and analysis of causal relationships
between variables and deductively understand reality within traditional norms. For
example, researchers in educational study use this scientific approach to make valid
decisions. On the other hand, variables in educational contexts are frequently too numerous
to identify and control in a systematic fashion. Then, it is hard to solve problems by
inductive reasoning alone (Ary 2002). Some qualitative researchers argue that the
mathematical model of quantitative research seeks only probabilities from large numbers
of randomly selected cases and fails to see the details of real life (Denzin et al. 2008:16).
Since the birth of qualitative research in the early 20th century, qualitative researchers have
held that a competent observation can report the world with sufficient objectivity, clarity,
and precision. Recognizing that individual perspective may be difficult to understand with
quantitative measurements and to assess casual relationships between variables, qualitative
researchers have used a variety of sources including personal experience, life story, and
cultural texts to describe routine or problematic moments and seeks meanings in
individuals‟ lives (Denzin, and Lincoln 2008:5). Consequently, qualitative researchers aim
to understand what lies behind any phenomenon, which is difficult to unveil from
quantitative methods (Strauss, and Corbin 1990:18)
3. Qualitative Method of the present study
This study values the importance of interpreting and understanding individuals‟ subjective
experience. Fraenkel & Wallen (2006) quote general characteristics of qualitative research,
47
which bear on the current research methods:
1. The natural setting is the direct source of data, and the researcher is the key
instrument supplemented by audio- videotaping equipments.
2. Qualitative data are in the form of texts in words and oral or visual forms such as
video / picture to portray the scene with maximum accuracies.
3. Process of the investigation is equally important as the product. The people‟
interaction/ reactions are the most important for the interpretation.
4. The hypothesis is inductively produced by examining the parts and put them
together to reach to the conclusion.
The explanation fits into the research goal of the current study to fill the gap of research
findings in the some existing research in the literature. In doing so, the following research
questions were set with a description of the areas that were addressed in the process of data
collection.
3-a) The Research Questions of the study
Research suggests that there has been an attempted change of teaching methods in Japan in
recent years due to the focus on globalisation. The major principles of the change were
identified and the reason for focusing on them in the research questions for this study are
explained below.
1. What are students‟ opinions about EFL principles?
Specific areas:
1 a) Monolingual method
1 b) The ideal teacher is NET
1 c) The earlier English is taught, the better the result.
1 d) English should be taught as a Lingua Franca for international
communication. (EIL)
1 e) English should be taught through the medium of English in a direct
48
method.
1 f) English is essentially learnt to interact with the Native speakers of the
language.
1 g) English as a world language affects national power.
2. What are Japanese students‟ experiences in the EFL classroom?
More specifically:
2 a) What do you think of Japanese students‟ language skills in general?
2 b) What is your achievement of your English skills?
2 c) How did you learn these skills?
2 d) What type of English skills do you further want to learn?
2 e) What kind of change do you want in EFL?
What follows presents theoretical frameworks that I relied on to organize the sub-research
questions.
3-b) Reasons for choosing the research questions
A number of English language principles are widely held by professionals and applied in
EFL worldwide. However, critics argue about their effectiveness in EFL classes such as
their pedagogical models (e.g.to provide codified forms, syntactic correctness,
interoperability, authenticity) or as their utility (e.g. fairness, teachers‟ readiness). This
study will look for student views on these principles, which includes usefulness of the
principles and their suitability for EFL goals at Japanese schools. In what follows, the
scholarly literature, which supports the debates of each principle, will be identified. The
following research questions were chosen to contribute to these debates in the literature.
Main research Question 1: What are students‟ opinions about EFL principles?
a) What are their views about the use of the Monolingual Method?
The monolingual method (using only the target language) has been popular since the
49
early 20th century, and influential in Japan as elsewhere. Both learners and teachers
have been affected by a belief in this principle (Medgyes 2003:64). For one thing,
there are several restrictions in applying the monolingual method in EFL (e.g.
students‟ lack of proficiency, teachers‟ readiness, lack of fairness). On other hand,
Malave et al. (1991:8-111) noted that culture is transmitted through language and
creates cultural identity through the process of mastering L1. The question concerns
the relationship between language learning and cultural identity. This study posits
that the question is useful in taking account of learners‟ English knowledge and
performances.
b) What are their views about advantages and disadvantages of NETs and
NNETs?
Native speakers (NETs) are invited to many Asian schools to improve students‟
English ability and they are expected to use a monolingual method. The JET program
in Japan has earned high recognition as a way to cultivate human and culture
exchange. However, the usefulness of native speakers in EFL is still controversial.
According to Medgyes (2003), the number of students who expressed preference for
native English teachers (NETs) or non-native English teachers (NNETs) was almost
the same although 40.3 % did not take a view (Medgyes 2003:70). It means that it is
difficult to compare the different parameters and the number is not high but important
in considering the utility of the principle. I consider that the question is crucial in
drawing out students‟ views on utilities (i.e. advantages and disadvantages of
monolingual methods) in EFL classes. I asked the students if they agree with the
latest assumption that a native speaker of the language can teach them appropriately
and better.
c) What are their views about the belief „the earlier, the better‟?
The issue of early learning of English is perennial from political and general
50
perspectives and in Japan language learning has recently been introduced to
elementary schools. There are disagreements in views about when language is best
acquired. For example, Singleton (1989:266) writes, “Learners exposed to early
second language instruction probably have some advantage in the very long run over
those whose exposure begins later.‟ Lennerberg (1967 in Bongaerts, T. 1991: 133)
took the view that “Language could no longer be completely successfully acquired
after the close of the critical period between age 2 and puberty.” It implies that
young learners have fewer barriers to study English. This study will investigate
perceptions of how starting age affects English skills in EFL contexts.
d) What are their views about learning English as a lingua franca or Standard
English?
There has been continuous growth of English usage as LF in the world with
eventually, over two billion English Speakers worldwide (Kachru, 1985 in Kubota
2001:48). This led to numerous debates on the choice of native or non-native
standard for English study (Jenkins, 2000 in Makaravo 2004:3). With the spread of
English as a FL another question arose related to its interpretation and authenticity.
Molave, et al. (1991: 117) suggested, “Linguistic accuracy is less critical to effective
communication in a second language than the accompanying para-linguistic and
extra linguistic aspects.” The idea is useful in describing the parameter models of
grammar, pronunciation, and lexis in English as LF. However, as the literature
showed, Japanese students focus on accuracy in using English, which might be
attributed to their academic needs or social-cultural factors.
e) What are their views about the use of the Direct Method in English class?
The method serves as a response to the Grammar-Translation method. For example,
over hundred years ago, Francois Gouin had painful experience studying German
when moving to Germany and memorized a German Grammar book and returned
51
to find that his 3 year- old –nephew acquired fluent L1 while he failed to understand
German. Series of methods such as Berlitz‟ Direct method were invented afterwards.
(Brown 1987: 34-45). In Japan, the Direct Method has been influential. This question
asks about the utility of the method in EFL contexts.
f) What are their views about the EFL goal of the native speakers‟ norm and the
question of grammatical versus communicative language learning?
In the last two decades, “ the aim of EFL has changed from understanding the high
culture of great civilizations to usages of the language for daily communication with
people from other countries (Byram 2008:6)” However, critics of World English such
as Phillipson (1992) contended that dominant use of English language for global
communication gives an imbalance of power. It implies a political dimension in
language teaching. As the literature reviews reported, the EFL policy in Japan is
vulnerable to the influence of the global spread of English around the world and its
influence on national power (i.e. economic and educational). Byram (2008:29)
considers that Japanese policy of EFL aims for economic purposes- investment in
human capital. This question looks into the students‟ view on their pursuit of learning
English and their needs of English in daily life.
Although Kubota (1998) said that an important goal of EFL is to meet the needs for
internationalization, investment in English education in Japan is lower than that in
South Korea and China (Hu, et al. 2012:353). A reason could be, as Kobayashi
(2001:71) reported, due to lack of social need for the English language. Then,
teaching native speakers‟ norm for university exams is not mirrored by the students‟
needs (Kobayashi: ibid.: 71). Mochizuki et al. (2008:11) agreed with Kobayashi
(ibid) that it is not uncommon for EFL teachers to object to the effectiveness of the
communicative approach in their large English class for students who have few
52
opportunities to use English inside and outside classroom. This study looks for the
students‟ views on a learning goal of the native norm, which influences pedagogical
choices.
g) What are their views about the relations between language skills and national
interests?
The spread of English around the world is relevant to globalization. In this regard,
Seidlhofer (2002) argues that a dichotomy of native and non-native speakers‟ norms
of English in teaching is worrying because it has influence over political force around
the world. It is clear form MEXT policy statement about „Japanese with English
abilities (as discussed in Chapter II) that there is concern in Japan too. This study
looks into the students‟ views whether they think English language skill would affect
national power balances or not.
Main research Question 2: What are Japanese student‟s experiences in the
EFL classroom?
h) What are their views about the perceived low level of Japanese students‟
language skills?
Inequality of English proficiency may arise due to socio-cultural influences. The use
of systematic investigation is important to break out from established patterns of
thinking (Strauss et al. 1990:87-89). This study does not apply quantitative
measurements because the value of English study differs for each student and it is
important to go deeper into their reasoning.
i) What are the students‟ views of their levels of English attainments, their
attitudes towards and their opportunities for learning English?
Participants of this study have different educational backgrounds, which are
education at schools; 1) in urban cities, 2) provincial cities, and, finally 3)
53
international schools. The question set to look for differences in their achievements
as they themselves saw them, which includes the best/least proficient English skills
as well as the attitudes of the students to different skills; and 2) toward their
opportunities to acquire these different skills.
j) How did the students acquire their English skills?
During the interview, the author asked about students‟ painful or pleasant memories
in the EFL classes. This question aims to identify contributing factors to attain
English skills in three perspectives: 1) instruction, 2) classroom factors, and 3) social
environment.
k) What type of English skills do students wish to develop further?
In this question, I will see how individual variables come into play to develop
language skills and look for their present needs or perceived needs of English skills.
l) What changes do they want to make in EFL classes?
The term „changes‟ refers to the students‟ wishes to make changes over a long period
of time (i.e. in the past, present or future) in English study in three respects: 1)
teacher- student relations, 2) learning activities in which knowledge was developed ,
and 3) the learning materials .
3-c) Justification of the qualitative method
This study is an empirical investigation of the students‟ experience and perceptions of EFL
via qualitative method using interviews. As to the research instrument of the interview,
Kvale (1996:70) wrote, “An interview is a uniquely sensitive and powerful method to
capture the experiences and lived meanings of the subjects‟ everyday lives.” Woods (1986)
added that, an interview requires trust, curiosity, and unaffectedness. For example,
interviewees faced with obscure questions or the interviewer‟s use of leading questions,
would affect the reliability of the data. As Kvale (2007:24-8) demonstrated, the author will
54
try to use strategies to understand presentations without prejudice. The following section
describes how the research questions were presented to the students at the interview.
3 - d) Linking the Interview Questions to the Research question
In order to make the interviews more friendly and relaxed, the current study has two sets of
interview scripts; 1) research questions in academic form and 2) interview questions in
vernacular form in table 2.
Table I-1.
Interview questions ( Vernacular
form)
EFL Principles
Research question (Academic form )
1 a)
1.
What are their views about the use of the
What do you think about learning
English by using only English
Language?
Monolingual Method?
2.
Is L1 usage and translation helpful
or hindrance in English classes?
3.
What type of English dictionary do
you use?
4.
Do you use concordancer?
1.
Do you have any experiences of
1 b)
What are their views about advantage and
learning English from both NT and
disadvantages of NETs and NNETs?
NNT?
2.
How did NTs teach students?
3.
What are the strength and weakness
of NT and NNT?
4.
Which of the two do you prefer?
1 c)
What are their views about the belief 1. Do you think that, by the age of
leaving high school, you are better at
„the earlier, the better‟?
English if you begin in elementary
55
school or only in junior high school?
1 d)
d)
What are their views about learning
1. Should the aim of EFL teaching be to
speak like a NS or to speak like a NNS?
English as a lingua franca or Standard
English?
1 e)
What are their views about the use of the
1. Do you think that only English should
Direct Method in English class?
be used in EFL classes?
1 f)
1. What type of English do you want to
What are the students‟ views about the learn?
goal of EFL of the native speakers‟ norm For example, do you prefer Standard
English or varieties of English?
and the question of grammatical versus
communicative language learning?
1. g )
1. Do you think Japan is losing power
What are their views about the relations because of the dominance of English?
between Language skills and national
interests?
General Question for ice breaking
Please tell me about your learning of
What kinds of experiences do Japanese
students have in EFL classes?
English, when you started, where you
learnt, your feelings about it
1.
When did you start learning
English?
2.
How long have you been learning
English?
3.
Why did you start learning English?
4.
What are your experiences with
English before entering schools?
5.
What kind of good exposure did you
have with English language at school
56
and at home?
6.
How do you enjoy your EFL?
7. What
are
the
negative
EFL
experiences?
2a)
What are their views about the perceived 1. What do you think of Japanese
low level of Japanese students‟ language students‟ language skills in general?
skills?
2b)
1. How did you learn English at
What are the students‟ levels of English
schools?
attainments, their attitudes towards and
their opportunities for learning English?
2. How did you study English outside
classroom?
3. What kind of effort are you making to
improve your EFL?
4. What do you think of your English
skills?
5. What do you think you can do in
English e.g. what can you read, what
can you understand when people are
speaking on TV etc.
2c) How did the students learn their
1. How did you learn your English
English skills?
skills?
2 d)
What type of English skills do students
1. What English skills do you want to
improve or need now?
wish to develop further?
2 e)
1. How do you feel your English
learning experience could have been
What changes do they want to make in
improved?
EFL classes? (e.g. myself, environment)
Closing questions
Where is English used?
Please tell me how do you use English in
57
your life today?
1.
When do you use English?
2.
Where do you use English?
3.
With whom do you use English?
4.
How do you use English?
In order to elicit in-depth data from the interviews, the author conducted pilot studies in
Durham to improve narratives and interview techniques. In what follows, I describe the
process of the pilot study.
3-e) Pilot Study
A pilot study aims to practice interview skills and improve the interview questions to
answer the research questions. For all interviews, before the interview recording started,
the author explained the research background and the purpose of the research to the
interviewees and delivered a consent form (appendix 1) for the agreement of the
interviewee. In order to ensure accuracies in data, every interview took place in Japanese
and was audio-recorded with some note taking. Interviews began by asking students‟ social
backgrounds and recording started when I first asked about EFL experiences at schools
(see appendix 52).
With the support of feedback from the supervisor, and with reference to the relevant
literature, the interview questions were developed. In order to make interviews operational
within limited time with little stress, the questions were re-examined and revised into eight
main questions with sub-questions in three focus areas.
After preparing the interview questions, I began contacting Japanese students studying at
the University of Durham. Two days later, I met the first interviewee and set up a place
and time for the interview. Four individual interviews and one group interview were
58
conducted.
After the pilot studies were completed, the digital data were transcribed into the written
texts. Later, I sent the transcriptions to interviewees for verifications of the interview
content. One student pointed out one area where the report was different from her intention
and added her explanations as to attitude toward English proficiency. These pilot studies
became a good initial practice to reduce unnoticed bias or prejudice. Overall, I learned that
it is important to construct a set of interview questions, which include common questions
and give the interviewees equal time. Consequently, it helped to reduce any possible
prejudice and increase reliability. The details of interviews are show in appendix 3.
The following reports the data from the pilot study, which is relevant for improving
interview questions for the main study.
3 -f) Reflection on the pilot study
The third interview with two students at a fast food restaurant made us recognize how
non-verbal components such as noise, seating arrangement and atmosphere affect the
interview. The fourth interview was held at a university in Durham to pilot improved
questions from a student majoring in economics. The male student was sympathetic and
helpful to participate in a pilot study and the researcher was able to pilot not only improved
interview questions but also interview skills and seating arrangement.
Following four individual interviews, I thought it important to conduct a focus group
interview to exchange their views on the issues partly because she learned that some
interview questions are salient to some interviewees but not for others. For example, NT
and NNT are not important for those who have long overseas living experiences.
In the process of interviews, some students talked long (e.g. the third interview) while for
59
some others (e.g. the first interview), it was not easy to create a relaxed atmosphere. At the
onset of the interview, the interview environment (e.g. seat arrangement and distance
between interviewer and interviewees) affected the relationship between interviewers and
interviewees. Toward the end of the interview, students became relaxed and talked more
freely about the research topics. I tried to avoid leading questions. However, when an
interviewee had a long pause, it was necessary to introduce some reference to literature to
make the research topics familiar (e.g. more than half of English speakers around the world
is NNT today). In addition, I talked about educational psychology and some lexical terms
(e.g. self-efficacy and attribution) that were unfamiliar to the student. Then, it was thought
that, the interviewees appreciated new lexical knowledge, which brought up their idea to
answer the questions.
From the pilot studies, I learned to; 1) keep to the interview schedule; 2) describe a focal
point clearly; 3) ask the same questions equally to every participant even when their
answers were anticipated; 4) avoid unconscious leading questions; and finally, 5) use
probing questions to confirm the interpretations. From these experiences, interview
questions were improved to use for the main study in Japan. At the start of the interview, it
was difficult to break the ice to share common ground due to a lack of mutual familiarity.
Breakwell et al. (2008:236-7) wrote that explanations of research are important to
encourage participation and provide confidence in answering the interview questions. In
addition, it is relevant to explain why the interviewees were chosen for the research
purpose.
After each interview, the order of interview questions was revised or added to and new
questions were colour coded. Although I had interview notes ready, these were not used
during the interviews to create a better atmosphere. I also found it important to have at
60
hand more knowledge in theories of teaching and learning English (i.e. EFL principles), in
educational psychology, and in the cultural contexts in learning English. It was thought that
the students enjoyed talking about issues related to education psychology such as
motivation, attribution, and self-efficacy because few students had opportunities to reflect
on these ideas in their lives. After the data collection, the data were translated into English.
During the whole process of the pilot study, the following issues were raised by the
students; 1) usefulness of translation in EFL; 2) the importance of teachers‟ praise, a lack
in English lessons in Japan, 3) burdensomeness of EFL textbook, 4) usefulness of stories
readings in contextual texts, and lastly, 5) difficulties in choosing English teaching
methods.
In sum, the interview worked unexpectedly well due to the students‟ openness and
appreciation in learning English. The transcribed texts were compared to the notes taken.
Finally, the order of the interview questions was improved to prepare for the main study in
Japan. To be more specific, as shown in appendix 1 and 2, the interview questions were
divided into three categories which each sub-questions were followed in order of students‟
experience, their views on EFL principles and psychological issues (e.g. motivation).
After all, from the five pilot studies, the author learned that a level of students‟
understanding of language study is associated with socio-cultural backgrounds as well as
individual frames of ideas in life. It meant that a qualitative research method is useful to
draw the hidden assumptions by examining the properties of individual experience.
4. Description of the Interview Process
61
Needless to say, this study was possible owing to the cooperation of gatekeepers. Prior to
this study, I attended a workshop at a University where a Professor of Engineering, (i.e. the
first gatekeeper) introduced his work. After obtaining consent from the supervisors, I sent
an email to introduce the research purpose of this study and its design. The professor
agreed to offer his help to get a permission to conduct a study at the university and to
provide access to his students to participate in an interview. Then, a meeting was held at
the University to discuss the plan for data collection with the first gatekeeper. During the
process of data collection, the study required a few more participants. Then, I sent a mail to
another professor (i.e. the second gatekeeper) to ask his help to find more participants at
the university. He swiftly sent a mail to a PhD student studying English. Still, the study
needed more female participants. I made a phone call to my friend (i.e. the third
gatekeeper). Finally, the fourth gatekeeper was a participant herself who brought two
friends. The following is the detailed description of this study. The following is the
detailed description of this study.
4-a) Instrument
I had prepared a handout to outline the research purpose and a biographic data
questionnaire as seen in appendix 3 and 4. At the beginning of the interview, I asked each
interviewee to fill in their biographic record (e.g. location of the birth) as well as academic
background (e.g. location of schools). Secondly, the main data were collected from
open-ended interviews with the author note taking. Although this study did not look for
quantitative data (e.g. agreement or disagreement toward EFL principles), some numbers
naturally emerged as we shall see in the presentation of data.
The important basis for a good interview is interest, respect, a desire to understand and
sensitivity to the narrator‟s feelings (Yow 1994) as an interview is influenced by the
interviewers‟ personal characteristics including race, class, ethnicity, and gender (Denzin et
62
al. 2003). From the pilot studies, I had learned that an interview reflects an interviewer‟s
character. In addition, an interview was a useful tool to capture the EFL experiences, which
emerged naturally from the subjects‟ descriptions of everyday lives.
As to the interpretation of interviews, it involves personal factors (e.g. motivation,
attitudes) that are not easily revealed in quantitative data. Interviews will provide
formidable advantages to explore affective factors.
4-b) Participants
The participants were BA, MA and PhD students studying at three universities in Tokyo. It
was the first time seeing the interview participants, thus it was possible to maintain
neutrality and avoid bias. The participating students were from high status universities,
which were chosen partly because they represent a wide geographic and social section
of society. There were nine male and six female participants and all participants were
Japanese citizens. In order to protect participants‟ anonymity and confidentiality, details of
the location of the interviews and detailed demographic data will not be included. Also
names of participants have been changed.
4-c) Data Collection
From the pilot studies, I learned that interview location affects data collection. Therefore,
the interview locations were chosen to be inside the university compass except the one,
which was held at the coffee shop in front of the university after the participant finished
her experiment late at night. The two prime criteria for the selection were convenience and
comfort. From the pilot studies, I found that it is comfortable to choose the location near
the universities to generate discussions. As to length of interview, between one to two
hours was the standard norm from the pilot studies' experiences.
63
The first interview was held in a meeting room reserved by the gatekeeper at the
department of engineering. Unfortunately, recording failed for this first interview. At the
start of the interview process, I found it difficult to stay on the topic and to make follow-up
questions. Then, interview questions were revised with post-interview comments and notes.
Gradually, the interview technique improved to stay on the same topics. After completing
six interviews in the same location, the author encountered difficulties to find more
participants. However, owing to the third gatekeeper, I was able to meet more female
participants at the different campus of the university. The last interviews took place in
September 2011.
Ultimately, every participant was articulate, answered the interview questions clearly, and
expressed their opinions. Helped by the environment, every interview finished without
external disturbance or restrictions. During the interview, notes were taken at minimum
level to maintain eye contact. After the transcription finished, the transcriptions were sent
to the participants for confirmation. Until the last interview was conducted, there was little
time for data transcription. The process of transcription was conducted after I returned to
Durham.
5. Data Analysis
5-a) Transcription and extension of the interviews
For the first transcription while still in Japan, I listened to the recording several times. Then,
I checked the first transcription back against the recordings for accuracy and found that
some interview questions were not asked from the two interviewees. This might have
happened owing to the tight schedule. The two interviews took places late in the evening.
Thereafter, in order to complete the interview, I wrote to the two students to ask for second
64
interviews and saw the students again. Finally, when students‟ answers were unclear in the
interviews transcription, I sent emails to follow up the questions and all students except
one replied to this email with gratitude quickly. The second transcription included
non-verbal sign such as long pauses, smile, interjections, and tones. The translations were
colour-coded and studied by taking notes until the final stage of the data analysis when
reading literatures of communicative theories for reflection and interpretation of the data.
Finally, with the help of the supervisors, three core themes were identified from the
plethora of information, which will be described later. Although it took long to finish the
transcription and translation, this time allowed me to become familiar with the students‟
comments and the delay in doing transcriptions did not jeopardize the analysis.
Finally, the interview data were disassembled into sections of key categories. The data set
was read and reread to review the themes until no new information was found to reach
theoretical saturation (Lincoln and Guba; 1985: 200-204). This means that the data
analysis is continued until a point where no further new knowledge of information are
yielded (Kvale 2007:44). Finally, during the process of the data analysis with the help of
supervisors, three major themes emerged; 1) EFL experiences, 2) Teaching methods; and
3) Communicative skills in Japan.
5-b) Translation
I translated the data into English. The meaning in the data is reflected more strongly in the
Japanese texts but it was necessary to use translations for the intended readers of this thesis.
Pym (2003: 485) described that translation requires linguistic, cultural and professional
knowledge. Fay and Davcheva (2011) wrote that a lack of fluency in English makes for
further linguistic complexity in this situation. I revisited the text to improve the translation.
To assure that no data was lost, I included the Japanese original in this work.
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5 -c) Thematic Analysis
Breakwell et al. (2008:251) said that there are four ways to analyze interviews; 1)
Categorical approach looks at data and establishes units of salient data; 2) Thematic
approach examines categories emerging from the complex elaborated statements; 3)
Network approach link themes which clusters with sub-categories and may form another
categories; and finally, 4) Holistic approach summarizes the data where researchers
describes the stories to draw meanings. The current study used thematic approach which
involves a number of different elements that are habitually linked together (Silkinson,
2004a in Breakwell et al. 2008; 251). Thematic approach emphasizes similarities and
differences between participants‟ views concerning the dominant themes (Breakwell
2008:270). According to Kvale (1996: 186- 196), the analysis involves a process ; 1) to
structure the interviews and give the overview of the occurrences; 2) to show differences;
3) to make comparison with other investigations; and 4) to obtain code reliability. The
interpretation of the data has two ways; 1) the process explanation to construct a theory to
draw general laws and predict future: and 2) the functional explanation to explain reasons
of how, as opposed to why, those explanations are not mutually exclusive to explain the
same phenomenon (Breakwell et al. 2008:8). This meant that the thematic analysis
emphasizes similarities and differences (Breakwell et al. 2008:270).
Analytic processes of this study involved two processes; the first step was “open coding”
to select characteristics of the sampling phenomena by giving key words (coding) to
classify the concepts, which break down the data and conceptualized each discrete event.
The collected data was categorized (coding) with sub properties (causes) to explain the
phenomenon with emerging dimensions.
The second step is the selection of the data that includes elaborated statements, which were
66
emerge from the interviews. The followings initial codes (themes) emerged from the
interview data. These codes are useful to construct the theoretical framework.
Table III - 1)
Codes and categories found for students‟ experiences
Codes
Sub Categories
EFL experience
Beginning of English exposure
After the birth to nursery school
Nursery school to kindergarten
At primary school
At junior high school
At senior high school
At higher education
Memory span
EFL experiences in Juku
EFL in private class or institutions for
cultivation
EFL after returning to Japan from expatriate
life
Private lessons
EFL at Yobiko ( preparatory school To prepare to enter the private junior high
for entrance exams)
school
To prepare for the university entrance
examinations
Entrance examination for university How students prepared for the entrance
and English skill
examinations?
When did the students developed the high
level of English?
Teaching
Students‟ views of textbooks
The contexts of junior high school textbooks
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The contexts of senior high school textbooks
The contexts of textbooks at Juku
How students used the textbooks
Teacher-students‟ relationship
Good EFL memory
Bad EFL memory
Teacher factors
At junior high school
At senior high school
At Juku
Good teachers
Communicative skills in Japan
Role of communication in EFL
At work
At school
With friend
At home
Self-efficacy
How do you use English now?
Language and power
Proficient skills
Motivation
Authenticity
Interpretation
Finally, in line with the constructivist paradigm, the author read and reread transcriptions
to identify the important themes. The opening codes were useful to generate codes, to
compare and contrast EFL phenomena, and themes naturally emerged. For example, the
students reported their anxieties to learn English at school. To contrast, a senior student
who began working for the trading company recognized peer pressure as a motivator to
work harder. The approach allows topics unknown to researchers to emerge from the data.
5-d) Credibility, Transferability, Dependability,Conformability
In qualitative inquiry, the conventional criteria of internal validity and external validity fail
because the inquiry lacks generalizability (Lincoln and Guba; 1985:43). However, these
68
criteria are also important in natural inquiry and counterpart criteria are needed (Lincoln,
and Guba; 1985:218). They suggested the term „trustworthiness‟ to replace the
conventional criteria of internal validity, external validity, reliability and objectivity.
“Trustworthiness” means whether an inquiry can persuade his or her audience that the
findings are worth paying attention to (ibid.: 290). It involves “truth-value,”
“applicability,” “consistency,” and “neutrality” (ibid.: 290). However, in natural inquiry,
these four axioms are inevitably flawed because “true value” resides in individual‟ minds.
Consequently, naturalists replaced the conventional criteria of validity and reliability with
the four terms; 1. credibility, 2. transferability, 3. dependability, and 4. conformability
(ibid. :300). Lincoln and Guba (ibid.) introduced several ways to ensure these criteria.
Firstly, “credibility” is ensured by prolonged observation. However, distortion of the data,
or misinformation might arise during the process of long inquiry (ibid.: 301). Then,
investigators must decide whether misinformation has occurred. In addition, investigators
need to establish “trust” to ensure that interests of the respondents will be honoured as
much as those of investigators (ibid.: 301-2). Secondly, “persistent observation” would
reveal characteristics that are relevant to the inquiry (ibid.: 304). Thirdly, “triangulation”
makes the data trustworthy, which has two ways; using different designs or different modes
of data collection (Lincoln and Guba; 1985:306). Finally, the use of different investigator
or the use of multiple theories is effective to ensure “credibility.”
Secondly, “peer debriefing” i.e. talking with others about the interpretations, in this case
with supervisors of the thesis, is the second technique to establish “credibility.” to (a) probe
the data, (b) test working hypothesis, (c) discuss methodological design; and (d) ensure
good judgments of an inquiry.
Thirdly, “negative case analysis” means a process of revising the hypothesis with
hindsight (ibid.: 309). The revision does not mean a previous inquiry is unaccountable but
69
negating instances are studied (ibid.: 311). Kidder, (1981:244 in Lincoln and Guba; 1985:
312) suggest that negative case analysis is to qualitative research as statistic analysis is to
quantitative.
Fourthly, “referential adequacy” means the use of recorded materials to provide
benchmarks for the data analyses and interpretations (ibid.: 313).
Finally, “member checks” means that the data will be checked by the stakeholders.
In sum, creditable findings will be produced by prolonged engagement, persistent
observation, and triangulation. One might suggest spending much time in the embedded
situation. However, it may cause person distortion and overreaction (ibid.). This study
utilized data transcription, the use of multiple theories and participants‟ checking of the
transcripts to ensure credibility.
Now, “transferability” implies external validity in conventional criteria. However, the
naturalist set out working hypothesis within a given contexts in given time. Therefore,
transferability is not included in naturalists‟ inquiries. Then, “dependability” implies that
the participants will be satisfied that they are not victims, involves examining the record‟s
accuracy, and finding that the data interpretation and recommendations are accepted (ibid.
318). Finally, “conformability” means that findings are logical, and have clarity (ibid.: 327).
In sum, „truthfulness‟ requires the establishment of balance of fairness and ontological
authenticity.
Kvale (2007:123-124) explained that validation of natural inquiry is embedded in every
stage of the construction of knowledge, which involves constant checking of research
questions and theoretical interpretation. In order to ensure the four criteria to ensure
70
credibility, the data was transcribed into written text with verbatim description, the text
was reread and examined to increase translation readability and the copies of written texts
were sent to the participants. In all, I tried to give all participants equal hearings to reduce
prejudice and construct consistency.
5-e) Ethical issues
„Informed consent‟ suggests the subject will receive careful and truthful information about
the research and a researcher receives consent. Confidentiality means subjects‟ right of
identities and his/her privacy protection Fluehar-Lobban (1994:7) suggests that some
participants refuse to sign the informed consent. On the other hand, Wax (1995 in Denzin
and Lincoln, 2003: 412) argues that the strict adherence of informed consent makes
fieldwork impossible. In addition to the consent, Yow (1994) suggests to receive a
signature on a release form of information. Clearly, an ethical issue, informed consent has
also legal ramifications when it helps to prevent misuse of private data. Usually, the social
science professions encourage open and public dissemination of the research findings.
Other ethical codes include the permission to use tape-recording or the degree and nature
of researcher‟s involvement at the scene of research. (Denzin & Lincoln 2003)
From the outset of the study, ethical issues were considered both in regard to privacy of the
participants as well as the effect that the outcomes may have on them. Prior to the study,
The Durham University Ethics guidelines was noted and adhered to. I applied for a
research approval from the Durham University Ethics Committee. Participants were given
anonymity and confidentiality. Consent to use the information was obtained from the
participants. I also obtained permission to conduct research from requisite authorities in
Japan.
71
IV Data Analysis
Introduction
In the Literature Review, we have reported on concern about the level of English
proficiency in Japan. However, little has been said on this from the perspective of learners.
The author surmises that these bleak views ignore socio-cultural perspectives. This study
aims to examine English as Foreign Language (EFL) learners‟ experiences on various
aspects of their learning (teaching, psychology, and their culture views) through qualitative
data from semi-structured interviews to analyze the situation and specific factors, which
they think to be important in the language-learning context. The participants in this study
came from different school systems, which included private, public, and integrated schools.
In this study, an integrated education refers to a school, which has kindergarten to higher
education.
This chapter analyzes Japanese students‟ views on the EFL principles, which have been
used in the past around the world and in Japan and their EFL experiences. The overall goal
is to examine the feasibility and practicality of these teaching principles from learners‟
perspectives and to get some implication for EFL in the future.
The organization of the data analysis is as follows:
First, I will report the results of the interviews about seven English teaching principles in
the following order: a) English only class, namely the monolingual method b) The
students‟ preference of NETs or NNETs, c) The students‟ views on early education of the
language d) The students‟ preference for learning of EFL or Standard English, e) The
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students‟ views of the direct method f) The views of the native speakers‟ norm, and lastly
g) The views on the role of the English language in the international power balance.
For the second main question, the author asked students views on Japanese students‟
language skills in general, more specifically: h) The students‟ achievements in English
skills i) The learning process of English j) The English skills that the students further wish
to improve on k) The students wishes or needs for change in the Japanese EFL arena.
In addition, in order to find the implications of personal characteristics (age,
gender, type of school, academic performance) and the students’ psychological
dispositions, the author asked the following questions to identify variables to deepen
understanding of the students‟ views.
 What are their motivations for learning English?
 What are their goals of their EFL learning?
 What do they attribute success and failures to?
Let us now start the data analysis of the use of English only instruction at Japanese school.
1 - a) The use of the Monolingual Method
Recently, constructivist theory has prevailed in language teaching and learning which
focuses on learners‟ interactions with other people and environments. The monolingual
method originated from this belief in forging communicative skills by using the target
language. Teachers and learners naturally adjust to construct meanings and develop their
language skill. During the interview, I asked about students‟ experience and their opinions
about the monolingual method. The result showed that two students supported the method
while seven students disagreed, and five students had mixed views and saw advantages and
disadvantages. Very few students had in fact experienced the method. This section opens
with the data from a student (1) who had mixed views. Within each section, students are
73
numbered consecutively to be able to refer to different views within each topic. Each
quotation is followed by an abbreviation of the name to preserve anonymity. The first
student (1) had English only classes at her private school:
I learned English by the monolingual method at my junior and senior high
schools from both NETs and NNTEs. The students naturally adapted to
English-only classes, and they took it for granted. Gradually, when we advanced
to higher grades, students started to prepare for university exams. Then, at senior
high school, teachers began using Japanese for explanations and Japanese was
easier for students to understand cognitive meanings and their translation. For
example, a teacher would explain, “This word is used in another word in
Japanese to reflect its contextual meaning. That is why the translation would be
this way.” In English-only instruction, the students only understand the surface
meaning and fail to develop logical understanding. A teacher explaining in
Japanese is more persuasive to understand grammar rules and its applications
than in English. Therefore, it is rather hard to choose the language of instruction.
In reality, it is important to have both monolingual and bilingual instructions.
中高は Monolingual 方式でしたので、日本人の先生も英語で授業をしていました。それは身についていたので、
それはそちらのほうを自然に受け入れていたんですが、大学に入ると、あと高三になると、ちょっとはっきり
覚えてないけど、高校の受験を意識する授業し、日本語を使うようになり、細かい細かいニュワンスの違いだ
ったりするのを説明するのは、日本語のほうが判りやすかったです。例えば、こことここの意味は日本語では
こういう風にはこう違うので、こうなるということをしっかり理解できる。英語だったら感覚的に受け入れて
しまう、しっかりと論理的に理解することが出来ない。日本語で文法の授業だと細かいことがしっかりと理論
的に理解できることが出来るので、どちらも使い分けかなと、どちらが絶対ということはない、両方あってい
いと思います。どっちが絶対ということはないと思います Ms. Hi
This student (1) learned English by the monolingual method at her private school and was
neutral in her view. It is useful to note that many private integrated schools have their own
school goals and most students at this type of school are from affluent families. The
general point the student is making is that use of the monolingual method prevents learners
from getting a thorough understanding of grammar etc and meaning - and so although she
74
says students adapted naturally to this method, it has this weakness and therefore both
monolingual and bilingual methods are needed. This corresponds with the two goals which
MEXT (2011) pursues communicative skills at junior high school and accurate reading for
university entrance exams at senior high school.
Another student (2) also took a mixed view but pointed out the lack of feasibility in the
monolingual instruction:
Let me see, the idea would be rather good. But I worry whether beginner students
would understand English fully if a lesson takes place in half measure. A lot of
effort is required. Then, I could not understand English at the beginning level. It
takes time for students to learn English by only English.
そうですね、まー、いいとは思いますが、ただ、えーと、中途半端にやると判らないかなと、大変努力が必要だ
と思います。やっぱり最初の方は判らなかったので。ある程度、長時間やらないと判らないと思います。(Mr. Ka)
This student (2) took the view that Japanese schools are not ready to use the monolingual
method. For example, there is a lack of competent teachers for English - only class. Then,
he focused on the problem of understanding which the first student had commented on: the
students may not understand the contents if it is only in English. Finally, he said that, it
takes time to promote the method and, since the classroom time is limited, the efficacy of
the monolingual method may be obstructed by a lack of teachers‟ readiness and students‟
proficiency levels.
Another student (3) attended an international school and was also uncertain:
Let me see…How I shall say. The suitability of the monolingual method depends
on students‟ ages. I was only an elementary school student when I began studying
at an international school in English. I am not sure if I was able to understand
grammar concepts at that time. However, I was able to be familiar with learning
English. In Japanese junior high school, it is good to mix both bilingual and
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monolingual. (Ms. To)
そうですね、うーん。年齢によると思いますね、向き不向きは。私が英語を英語だけで習っている時はまだ小学
生でしたので、文法をその時点で習って意味があったかどうかというのは、疑問ですし。ただ、英語に対しての
親しみが持てたという事は、英語を英語で習えたのは親しみを持てたという意味で英語を英語で慣れえたという
事がプラスに働いているのですけど。中学校になったら混ぜて半々がバランスがいいのかなーと思います。
This student (3) began attending an international school at the age of six and agreed with
student 1 that she adapted „smoothly‟ but she also agreed with students 1 that students at
early age do not understand the logic of grammar. She does not say if this is a problem in
the way, that student 1 does but she agreed that both methods are necessary as with both
previous students. This student and the others seem to believe that, at elementary school,
the monolingual method might be better for learning language - an issue we shall discuss
under research question 2.
Now, the data analysis turns to students who agreed with the method. The next student (5)
described her view from a socio-cultural perspective. Even though she begins by
expressing a reservation, she goes on to express her support for this approach:
It is hard to agree that the monolingual method is good way to learn English.
Nevertheless, English only instruction is suitable especially for Japanese students
who are shy to practice English. Students tend to use Japanese language whenever
it is available. It prepares Japanese students to attend NETs‟ class. Japanese
students tend to use English to understand English. Japanese society is very
conservative to people from different cultures. Therefore, I wonder how many
students can help foreigners in trouble by saying “Can I help you?” When I was in
China as an intern student, I could not speak Chinese well, but many Chinese
people helped me. In the research room, Japanese students work with exchange
students.
But I think that Japanese students would be reluctant to mix with
foreigners outside Japan. It is only a matter of time to get used to mixing with
foreigners.
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べきというのはどうも――。私はとくに日本人に対して英語だけ方がいいと思います。特に日本人といったのは、
Shy な性格があるので、日本人には英語で話した方いいと思います。といいうのは日本語が通じると思うと日本語
を使ってしまうという安心感があるので。外国人の先生でどうしても英語を使わなければいけないという時に役
に立つと思います。判らなければ辞書を引いて調べようとしますから。日本は外から来た人に対し、閉鎖的な社
会だとも思います。だから外国人が困っている時に、„can I help you “といえるかどうか。例えば中国だったら、私
がインターンに行った時も、まだそれほど中国語ができなかった時でも、結構、皆、世話をやいてくれるのです。
うちの研究室は比較的に外国人と一緒にいるという風潮がありますけど、外国に行った時に、積極的に彼らと話
できるかというとやはり知りごみをしてしまうと思います。慣れてくれば、時間が出来るのですけどね。(Ms. Ku)
This student (5) visited China and France for her internship, and agreed that the
monolingual method is good for Japanese because of their reticence. She implies that
because Japanese students are shy and Japan is a conservative society when dealing with
foreigners, they would benefit from the English-only class. In another part of the interview,
she described the psychological sensitivity of Japanese students as compared to students in
China and France and wished that the students would increase their communicative
competence by the monolingual method. She seems to imply that the method would
change students and make them less shy.
Another student (6) talked about her experience in Arabic language class and contrasted
with her experiences of learning English:
From my experience, one American lecturer from a protestant church taught
English conversation by the monolingual method, whereas NNETs teach English
reading and translation by using Japanese. I think monolingual method is better to
improve English, but it creates gaps between fast learners and slow learners. The
monolingual method is more difficult in small class. I have not attended English
classes by the monolingual method before I entered university.
Now, I attended an
Arabic language course by the monolingual method. Today, when students do not
understand a meaning well, the teachers use gestures to understand meanings and it
helped the students to keep learning in long-term memory. The monolingual
method would take a longer time at higher cost. However, the monolingual method
would be an effective way to learn a language naturally.
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私の経験からは、英会話だけはアメリカのプロセステスタントチャーチから来ているアメリカ人の先生たちがす
べて英会話をやっていましたが、英語はほとんど日本語で授業というスタイルですよね。私は Monolingual のほ
うが延びると思いますし、生徒間で差が出てしまうと思います。すごく人数が尐ないと難しいと思います。大学
に入る前、私自身は完全に英語だけの授業というのは出たことはないです。アラビア語の経験が混じってしまい
ますが、アラビア語は今日のクラスも Native のクラスの授業ですが、意味が判らない時は Gesture などを交えて教
えてくれるなど、言葉がわからない時、言葉がはっきりと印象に残ると思います。きめ細かくやるのはコストが
かかってしまうと思いますけど、そういう風にやったら日本の人はもっとこう自然に英語がしゃべれるようにな
るかもしれないと思いました。(Ms.Ho)
This student (6) agreed with an idea of other students (1 and 2) in that English-only
instruction is not always easy for students to understand contexts. However, she supported
the monolingual method because it would improve English proficiency with increased
exposure to English. Interestingly, she supported monolingual class in large class in that
the students are passive learners whereas in small class, the monolingual method creates
gaps in the level of understanding between beginners and advanced learners of English.
Then, contrasted with other students (1.2), she had more positive attitudes to the
introduction toward the monolingual class, because she was impressed by NETs versatility
by using gestures which made students understand what is happing in the class and helps
lift the students out from anxiety and dismay in English only class. Ultimately, she
supported the monolingual method in higher education.
The next student (7) described advantages of the method:
I think the monolingual method is useful because we can learn how to think in
English. It is difficult to speak English unless we change our cognitive mode into
English. However, at the university, many students have to think in L1 first and
change to L2. Meanwhile, it is rather difficult to switch two languages at a time.
Let me see...But NETs do not use Japanese in class. So…I still think it is more
comfortable for students to have a mother tongue When I was learning French in
England, I felt it more comfortable if a French teacher spoke some English in class.
For example, when a teacher asked the students “Do you have any questions?”,
even if someone had a question, he/she would not know how to ask the question in
78
English or they would be caught in fear that if he made a language mistake, other
students would correct his errors. Thus, the monolingual method would compound
the fears of the student.
それは、やっぱりある意味では有効だと思いますね。なぜなら、英語ですべてやれば、英語で思考することが可
能になると思います。でも大学で行って思うんですけど、大体の人はやはり一度、日本語に直さなくてはいけな
いと思うんですよ。直してもう一度英語に変換しなくてはいけないんですが。そうすると、英語で全部やっても、
根本的に思考法を変えないと英語が出ないですよね。うーん、でもNativeの先生は日本語ができないです
よね。だから、うーん、でもやはり日本語があった方が安心出来るのではないかと思います。うーん、でもやっ
ぱりフランス語でやっている時、やはり尐し先生が英語でしゃべってくれたら心強かったなと思いました。やは
り、日本人先生がずっと英語を使っても不安だし、逆に何を言っていいか良くわからないと思います。例えば先
生に「質問ありますか。
」と言われた時、本当はあるのにそれはどうやって言っていいかわらないとか、自分が失
敗したら、みんなに何か言われるとか、と思っていてなかなか発言できないとか、やはり恐怖心が、monolingual
だと生まれると思います。(Mr. Ta)
This returnee (7) learned French in the U.K. and described an advantage of the
monolingual method in that students are expected to think in English in the monolingual
class and it would be better not to switch. However, he worries that students would be
placed in fear in English only class to ask for help in the class that inhibits effective
learning. Japanese students‟ reticence may be present in class with students with different
English proficiency. It implies that the students learning would be muted with anxieties.
However, in another question (e), he described English only class in the direct method and
said that English only instruction would be difficult for public school at early age, but
suitable for advanced learners for higher motivations and goals. It implies that advantage
of the monolingual methods run in proximity to its disadvantage.
Hereafter, the data analysis will turn to look at the students‟ views who mainly disagreed
with the monolingual method.
The next student (8) pointed out the importance of fairness:
I am not in favour of the monolingual method. Because it will widen gaps among
students and it would be more damaging than helpful.
やはりそれは、その、自分はそういう考え方は好きじゃないです。そうなると出来る人と出来ない人の格差が広がる
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というか、それが危険というかそうなる可能性があるというか。(Mr. Ha)
This student (8) learned English for the first time at Junior high school and said that the
monolingual method is not good because it would widen the gaps between learners. The
implication seems to be that teachers would not treat students equally, which creates
discrepancy between fast learners and slow learners. He implied that levels of English
proficiency differ in school.
Parents send their children to private language lessons and
prepare children for competitive academic environment while some others‟ English
exposure is limited to EFL at school. It may imply that the monolingual class has relation
with socio-cultural perspective.
For the monolingual method in beginners‟ class, a student (9) disagreed by talking of its
lack of efficacy:
The monolingual method is inefficient. For instance, we look at „apple‟; we will
know its meaning at the first glance. In turn, it is difficult to contextualize texts
without Japanese explanations. Therefore, it is more effective to give meanings
with verbs and nouns in Japanese. I am in doubt to expect noticeable progress in
only English. Nevertheless, the monolingual class could be effective to a certain
extent.
Monolingual method は非効率だと思います。例えばりんごを出されて、「りんごだ」とすぐわかっても、多分見た
瞬間にりんごだと頭で思っているのですよね。日本語を介入しないで理解するのは難しいと思います。であと、
なにか、名詞でも動詞とかでも日本語でぱっと言ってしまう方が効率的だと思うので、英語だけだというのはど
うなんだろうと思います。ある程度は良いと思います。(Mr. Se)
This student (9) said that it is faster to explain in Japanese for young learners. He also said
that it is difficult to understand concrete ideas without the mother tongue, a theme we saw
above even among these who were mainly in favour. Therefore, he implied that mixing
both Japanese and English makes meaning more explicit.
The next student (10) talked about mismatch between different cultures:
At school, English only instruction...At junior high school it is difficult to learn a
new language in monolingual method because students do not have any linguistic
80
knowledge to understand English. I worry that English-only class would create
mismatches. What shall I say...? I mean that English language conveys different
feelings from Japanese language and that it is difficult to understand English
without using our mother tongue. Hence, I do not prefer the monolingual method.
学校で、あー、なるほどなるほど、中学校という意味で、あの、いきなりまだ下地の準備できない段階で、English
Only というのは、なかなか、やはり、ミスマッチとかも生じるのではないかと思うのですけど、あのー、やっぱ
り感覚というのが、日本語の感覚と、例えば英語の感覚というのがあると思うのですけど、それがどう違うとい
うのは、やっぱり日本語を使わないとなかなか理解できないと思うので、そういった意味では、頭でっかち、English
Only というのはどうかと思います。(Mr. Ot)
This student (10) also focuses on the difficulties of understanding but adds the idea that the
languages convey different feelings. However, he added that different language conveys
different meaning which supports linguistic externalism (i.e. Sapir-Whorf hypothesis) in
that language control thoughts. Thus, he considered that the monolingual method is not
good for compulsory education. In order to improve these situations, another student (11)
suggested:
Let me see... if a classroom goal is to develop output skills (i.e. speaking and
writing), the monolingual method is suited. In this case, teachers need to give
students reminder notes in Japanese (e.g. test schedules) to avoid possible
miscommunications. I guess that an efficacy of the method depends on learning
goals. If the goal is input skills (e.g. grammar, pronunciation), it is more efficient to
use Japanese explanations.
うーん、Output が目的の授業でなるなら、すべて英語でもいいのですが、テストの日程とか、そういう重要事項
なら、日本語で文章化して配るなりする必要があると思うのですけど、でもそのほかのところ Output が目的であ
れば、すべて英語で良いと思いますけど、Input が目的ならやはり日本語を使ったほうが英語の理解が早くなると
思うので、目的にもよると思います。(Ms. No)
This student (11) said that the feasibility of the monolingual depends on the goal. He
suggested that Japanese explanations are more effective to provide receptive skills (i.e.
input skills in his term). Then, he referred to a need of „reminder note‟ in Japan to ensure
students‟ levels of comprehension and interpretation. By contrast, the other student (12)
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said:
The monolingual method is difficult for beginners to understand English
meanings. Therefore, memories become fuzzy and difficult to store in a long-term
memory. Therefore, explanations in students‟ mother tongues are important.
Indeed, translation is important as well.
そうですね。英語だけだと、上級レベルはいいと思うのですが、特に初心者は例えば文法を習いだした人だと
か、理解が曖昧になってしまうと思います。それは記憶に残りにくいですし、例えば自分で文を組み立てた時
に、やっぱり障害になると思うので、最初は、母国語の補助というものはやっぱり大事だと思います。
(Ms. Za)
This student (12) began learning English at her primary school and said that the challenge
of using English all the time in class is too ambitious. She offered some support for some
other students‟ views in that the learners would fail to understand learning context fully in
the monolingual classes, and that this factor likely to decide the levels of students‟
linguistic knowledge which it is assumed to be a lack of knowledge for later use. Therefore,
she recommends teaching English through a mother tongue to build concrete
understanding. She might indirectly imply that it is difficult to develop language skills at
school by the monolingual method.
Summary
This section asked the students‟ opinions about the monolingual method. The data showed
that few students had attended schools that used the monolingual method in their
compulsory education. However, during the interviews, students were aware of the
advantages of using the monolingual method that includes extensive exposures to English
and opportunities to use English for students who tend to suffer due to their culturally
inherited reluctance to use English. Nevertheless, few students expressed trust in its
applicability of English only instructions. The reasons includes 1) impracticality (i.e. lack
of teachers, large size class, and students‟ insufficient comprehensions skill), 2)
inefficiency (i.e. it‟s faster to explain mother tongue) and 3) impracticality (e.g. a shortage
of English lessons), 4) misunderstandings may take places between speakers of different
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language and cultures or among students with different language proficiencies. In addition,
5) students cannot check accuracies of their understandings. Students‟ memories become
unclear and they fail to develop skills to contextualize the knowledge into different
situations. Lastly, 6) Japanese students preferred to have a comfortable atmosphere in the
class and thus errors corrections become problematic in the monolingual class.
The data suggested that the monolingual method, in most learners‟ opinions, is good for
elementary school when students are less self-conscious and enjoy using English in class.
Gradually, students prefer to have both Japanese and English instructions to ensure
accurate understanding.
1 - b) About the advantage and disadvantages of the native
English teachers and the non-native English teachers
Due to the spread of English in global communities, English teachers from native speaking
countries (henceforth NETs) are invited to many Asian schools to improve students‟
English ability. NETs are considered better because they have high communicative skills.
The vast majority of NETs in Japan are Westerners and approximately half are Americans
(Parmenter, 2000:13). This section explores the students‟ views of L2 learning from NETs,
non-native English speaking teachers (henceforth NNETs), and their preferences including
their advantages and disadvantages in English learning. For this study, the term NETs
refers to teachers who use English as their mother tongue or first language whereas NNETs
is used for teachers who acquired or learned English as an additional language.
The result indicated that four students agreed that learning from NETs is better while four
students disagreed. Six students had mixed views and explained strengths and weakness of
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NETs and NNETs. In line with other research questions, this section starts from students
whose views were uncertain.
The first student (1) is clear in using the phrase “regardless of their nationalities.”
I prefer pair teaching with NETs and NNETs regardless of their nationalities. NETs
are able to demonstrate English appropriately. However, some ideas of NETs are
difficult to understand for students because they are derived from the culture and
taken for granted by NETs. By contrast, NNETs‟ sometimes use deviant English in
grammar, but they understand students‟ difficulties in interpretations and explain it
clearly in our mother tongues.
エーと、理想としては、Native の方と日本人の方、いや、別に日本人に限りませんが、Non-Native の方と二人ペア
ーというのが理想ではないかと思います。弱さとしては当然のことながら、NNETs の場合 NETs に比べて、英語
を使う量が尐なくなってしまうので、例えば、ちょっとした文法の間違えが発生してしまうことがあります。長
所としては、エーと、NET の方は例えば、Native Speaker にとっては当然なことであっても、Non-Native Speaker
にとっては当たり前でないことがありますので、そういうことに気づいて、正しい説明が出来るということが Non
-Native の方の長所ではないかと思います。 (Mr. Su)
Firstly, this student (1) described advantages and disadvantages of NETs and NNETs and,
then he said, he preferred to have both NETs and NNETs in a class. One of NNETs‟
weaknesses is inability to have native-like competence to perform the language. However,
he said that, NNETs have an important role to help students to understand contexts well.
Secondly, the student pointed out the importance of cultural dimension. He implied that L2
teaching does not rely solely on knowledge of language but also cultural knowledge. In a
way, it is very challenging to communicate with English speakers without knowledge of
their culture. It is rare to hear English spoken in daily life in Japan and it is not easy to
have many opportunities to see many different cultures. This student described the
strengths and weaknesses of NETs and NNETs. Then, he supported to have pair teaching in
a class. Meanwhile, pedagogical consideration in relation to the contrast between NETs
and NNETs are less important in teaching said another student (2) who described teachers‟
personality as more important than whether they are NET or NNETs:
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It depends on the personality. Good teachers are good because of their personalities
rather than native-ness or non-nativeness.
それも人によると思います。Native の先生が一番いいとは思いません。(Ms. Za)
The student (2) believed that „ningensei‟ –humanity- is vital for teachers to develop a good
relationship with students. Language learning is unique in a sense that language teachers‟
influence on learning is seen to be much more significant than those of other subjects‟
teachers. She continued.
NNETs know the concept of „language‟ by comparing the two languages. For
example, NNETs can explain grammatical rules better than NETs because they
know differences between Japanese and English. In contract, NETs can perform
English with native pronunciation with colloquial flair. Virtually, quite a large
number of NNETs‟ English pronunciations are bad and students pick up these bad
examples while NETs tend to continue their lessons without checking students‟
levels of understanding the contents.
NNETs の長所は言語を捕らえる概念を学ぶことができるという長所だと思います。例えば、動詞とか形容詞とか、
言語が何かと考えるのが長所だと思います。NETs の長所はどうしてしゃべっているか、彼らがどうやってその英
語を使っているのかを体感することが出来るので、実際にそれを学んで、自然に出来るようになると思います。
NNETs と時には、やっぱり発音が悪い先生もかなりいて、それを私の後について発音してみましょうとか呼んで
みましょうとかいうことがあって、その悪い発音を無理やりに教えているようで。NET の先生はこちらが完全に
理解できていなくても授業が進んでしまうとか、理解できているかどうかを確認しないままに授業が進んでしま
うところがあると思います。(Ms.Za)
Early on, this student (2) agreed with the previous student (1) in that NNETs can explain
difficult points (e.g. syntactic and semantics) by using their L1 and L2 knowledge.
Secondly, she appreciated NETs‟ presentation of authentic English, which becomes models
of learning. In this regard, she pointed out NNETs‟ inappropriate model of English
pronunciation and she worries that deviant pronunciation by NNETs would become models
for the student. She implied that Japanese students have the desire to speak like a native
speaker. Although the students wish to learn native-like pronunciation, in the
communicative approach, students are apt to be provided with phonetic categories in
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continuous mode (i.e. pronunciation in contexts) rather than subtle exceptional training of
phonetic contrasts. Thirdly, she said that, during lesson, NETs tend to fail to assess
students‟ level of understanding that makes students difficult to have individually tailored
feedback. It may imply that NETs class is designed to provide communicative skills (e.g.
fluency) in earnest rather than analyzing accuracy of English (e.g. grammar, pronunciation).
Certainly, whether authentic uses of NETs‟s English would be distractive or helpful might
depends on levels of English proficiency.
When discussing connected issues of humanity, another student (3) said:
I felt repugnance toward NNETs. Firstly, except NNETs who teach Jyukeneigo
(English for university exams), NNETs tend to have more pride. It might be a good
thing, but I accept it if the NNET has good phonic skills. NNETs appeared to be
confident without much of these skills and some NNETs are intolerant of students‟
language errors. Of course, if a student cannot fix it after a lot of help, it is the
student‟s fault. Unfortunately, language skill is unlikely to emerge so early. I have
heard many students complaining that even if speakers of the same language fall
into errors, they do not understand why NNETs gets angry with students for L2
language errors. From my experience, students with low proficiency tend to face
anxieties to use English in class. Students need to feel comfortable in immediate
situations to use the language. I do not know why it happens. It is good enough to
express ourselves comfortably in language class. If we have negative feelings, we
tend to have negative feelings toward it (i.e. English study).
私は特に日本人の外国語の先生に嫌悪感を持っています。受験英語を教えている先生以外は、まず第一に英語の
先生は自分のことに自信を持っている先生が多くて、それはいいことではあるかもしれないけど、すごくきれい
な発音の先生だったらもちろんそれはかまわないのですけど。自分が出来るという気持ちを持っている人が多い
ので、自信とは違って、優越感を持っている先生が多いので、一部の先生は、生徒がちょっとミスしたときに非
常に怒ったりするので。それはもちろん、何度、いわれても直せないのは生徒のほうも悪いと思いますが、でも
言語の性格上、すぐに直せるというものでもないと思うので。日本人同士で話していたら、言い間違いもあるの
で、どうして日本人の先生に Native ではない先生にそんなに言われなくちゃいけないのかということをよく、そ
86
ういうことをちらほら耳にします。 どうも私の周りにいた日本人の先生の話なんですけど、あの、そうも出来な
い人って言うのは、特に英語なんかだと务等感を持ちやすい。どうしてか判りませんが。言語という特性上、話
している時に気持ちよく話せればそれでいいわけですね。逆にちょっとでもいやな気持ちを持つと、逆にものす
ごく、嫌悪感を持ってしまうと思うんですね。(Ms. Ku)
The student (3) agreed with the previous student (2) about NNETs‟ weakness in that
NNETs lack linguistic and performative competences. It may suggest that NNETs choose
to teach grammar rather than pronunciation. Secondly, she is in agreement with the
previous student in that the character, humanity of teachers is important, and she says that
NNETs are intolerant to students‟ lexical errors in oral tasks in class, which are
unavoidable and acceptable to practice English. She said that it is depressing to receive
error correction by non-native speakers of English who are not fully competent in using
authentic English. It appears that different criteria are used to define a good teacher
between NETs and NNETs. Thirdly, she pointed out that NNETs have insensitive attitudes
(i.e. superior complex) would de-motivate students and affect their self-efficacies. This
implies that, first, it is important to create comfortable atmosphere in language class.
Then, she (3) further claimed:
Nevertheless, I do not think NETs are always the best to teach English. NNETs
have the same learning experience with students. Conversely, NETs have faster
reactions to students and teach appropriate use of English. I learned English from a
linguist from Switzerland who is NNETs. I trust his view of a language as NNETs. I
consider that NNET‟ view (e.g. Swiss) is important.
最もいいとは思いません。日本人の先生はご自身が発音などで苦労したとかいう経験があると思うので、日本人
の先生は必要ないとは思いません。ただ,あの、一緒でない方がいいと思います。例えば、会話だったら NET の
方がいいと思います速度が速いのですし、こう時はこういう使い方をしないよということを教えてくれるので。
ただ言語学者の先生から伺った事ですが、彼も native ではありませんが、でも彼の英語がすみにおけないかとそ
んなことはない;今まで習った先生のなかでは、Non Native の先生の中では一番信頼できると思います。そうい
う意味では Non Native Speaker の見方は必要だと思います。(Ms. Ku)
She valued teachers‟ knowledge of English and Japanese languages by referring her
experience to learn English from multilingual speakers (e.g. NNET).
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Another student (4) reinforced the advantages of NETs:
It is good to meet NETs in the class because it is not only for pronunciation but rather as an experience to meet native English speakers. Then, students will know
that it is OK to talk to English speaking people and these experiences at school
provide positive effects on students‟ willingness to communicate in English and
understand different cultures in the future. If only NNETs teach English, one day
when we become adults, it is difficult to talk to foreigners in English despite
grammatical competence that we have. Intercultural communication is scary
because it requires experience of the world. Therefore, it is good to learn from both
NETs and NNETs.
目的には言語というよりも、Native のその人種の、その方がそこにいらっしゃるわけじゃないですか。発音とか
じゃなくて、Native というかたという、その人がいるという、それが一番重要だと思って。なんと言うかな、そ
の人とー。教育のその時にそういう人と話す経験とか、話していいんだと、話して大丈夫だと思うその経験を持
つことが、まー、将来その、なんだろう、理解しようという姿勢とか、話そうとする姿勢に影響すると思うので。
ウ―ン、そうだな、そのー、はい、そうですね、なんだろう。義務教育でずっと英語の勉強の時に日本人の人に
教えてもらったとするじゃないですか。そうすると、急に、まー、ぱっと大人になった時に、目の前に外国の方
がぱっと出てきた時に、話せないと思うんですね、いくら Vocabulary とか文法とかがなかに入っていても。怖い
というか、うーん、未知の存在なので、一忚、一番そういう面で Native の存在のはいいと思います。Best かどう
かは、そうですね。目的によると思うんですけど。(Mr. Na)
This student (4) is more positive about learning from NETs in that, before students fully
encounter the situations of intercultural communication, students need to learn and practice
how to operate the conversation in English in intercultural situations. He implied that,
communicative skills require not only linguistic knowledge but also experience to use
English with native speakers. Therefore, he expected schools to provide opportunities to
use English with NETs. Here, intercultural communication has emerged as an important
factor in language teaching. He meant that, in a country like Japan where the students have
extremely scarce chance to interact in English outside the classroom, it is natural to have
resistance or anxiety in English communication. Therefore, he considers that, NETs at
school provide students opportunities to handle their anxiety in English communication,
A student (5) described her experience to learn culture:
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Whether NETs or NNETs, it is not desirable to learn language in a large class.
Especially, teachers have many students in a class and students have to practice
English with other students, which was quite boring. Nevertheless, at the university,
I was able to learn how to think in English from NETs and the idea that it is
acceptable to express opinions without rules of formalities. The advantage of NETs
is to teach their culture.
Native からでも一対Massでやるのはあまり意味がないなーと感じました、特に学校の英会話での一対 mass で native
speaker と students という感じだったんですけど、結局、一対一とやる時間がないので、結局、隣の人と練習してみるというこ
とでは、時間もあまりつまらなかったと言う記憶がありました。 良かったという事は語学そのものより、あのー。英語的
考えというか、ドンドン発言して良いということを学べたということとか。Culture を学べることが Native Speaker
の良いところだと思います。(Ms. Ho)
In contrast to other students, this student (5) focused on a large class-size and said that it is
difficult for NETs to deal with individual students for oral tasks. However, in another part
of the interview, she said that, English classes by NETs is more suitable for large class
where students‟ English proficiency vary extensively but students are unable to have
individual feedback by NETs at school. Importantly, she appreciated the opportunity to
learn communication style in the West from the NETs in that they talk without formality,
what they want to say whereas, in the East, people talk indirectly to respect harmony
within groups. These two students (4, 5) meant that language learners need socio linguistic
competence to engage openly and respect others in intercultural situations.
The other student (6) considered different situations of English uses:
Let me see, for a student who wishes to speak in native-like English, the principle
is correct. However, for student to write essays, it might not be the ideal model.
In addition, between Chinese and Japanese communication, we are not apt to
attain native speakers‟ fluency.
そうですね、うーん、Native のように話したいなら、それはいいと思います。ただ英語で論文を書いたり、
communication する時に、みんな Native のような英語が本当に要求されているかどうか?アメリカとかイギリ
スとかそういったものが要求されているのかというのが、ちょっと疑問を感じます。例えば、日本人と中国人
が英語で話す時に、そこまでの英語を使う必要がないので。(Mr. Ka)
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This engineering student (6) studying to analyze oral skills of Japanese language learners
commented from an engineering perspective which make distinctions between fluency and
accuracy mandatory. Earlier in the interview, he referred to English in Japan as non-ethnic.
It means that there are no particular targeted countries and the purpose of English
communication is mostly for academic and vocational purposes. Here, the notion of
interaction is an international community at large where, in global community, English is
used for instrumental purpose. In the question (d), he said that it is difficult to attain native
level of English“どうせやってできっこないので。”. He is more positive than others are and said
that native-norm of English accuracy and fluency is not realistic goal. Then he further
continued:
I think, NETs‟ classes were more enjoyable than NNETs. It was not only enjoyable,
but NETS‟ pronunciation was attractive. A disadvantage of NETs is … I am not
sure if it is called a disadvantage or not, but when students cannot understand NETs
well, students, especially beginners, will be in trouble. In addition, NETs have
different teaching skills, and I prefer to learn from teachers with a lot of teaching
experiences.
そうですね、やっぱり、NETs の先生の方が、楽しかったと思います。まー。楽しかったし、まー、発音がいいの
で良かったと思います。弱点は、そうですね、弱点かどうかわかりませんが、全く聞き取れなかった時に、あの
ー、あのー、英語のレベルが低い状態では、あのー、困る、意味が判らないので困るということ。あと NET の先
生も経験の差があると思うので、経験が豊かなほうがいいと思います。 (Mr. Ka)
He (6) agreed with other student (2.3) in that NETs‟ pronunciation is attractive. In addition,
he added that NETs‟ classes are enjoyable. This student described EFL as enjoyable and
many students in this study wish to feel comfortable in EFL classes where they face the
need to learn accuracy for their university exams. In addition, the media advertises an
image of NETs having more humour during lessons than NNETs at Juku. Naturally,
students can enjoy NETs‟ fluent talk using good pronunciation and their real use of
language with their culture flare. In addition, he pointed out the difficulty of listening
comprehension in NETs‟ class. Ultimately, there are a number of advantages to learn from
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NETs. Nevertheless, regardless of whether native or non-native, he preferred to learn from
teachers with more experience. It implied that teachers need not only syntax, morphology,
and phonology, but also they need to understand students‟ motivation and their culture (e.g.
comprehension). It implies that good teachers are not born but made through experience.
The preceding six students had mixed views by describing strengths of both NETs and
NNETs. Now we look at students who supported the use of NETs more strongly.
The first student (7) appreciated learning English from NETs:
I learned English from NETs in UCLA a month ago. There were many students
from Europe (e.g. France and Spain) and I found it difficult to understand them,
partly because our English is not fluent. However, NETs‟ English pronunciation is
very attractive and easy to understand. In this sense, NET is indeed better to teach
English because of their authentic pronunciation, and they can understand students
faster. It was a good experience to learn from NETs.
UCLA の生徒はいろいろな国の方がいて、先生は NET でしたけど、やっぱり話していて、フランス人とかスペイ
ン人とか、まー、勿論英語がぺらぺらじゃないということもあるんですけど、なかなか通じづらいところがあっ
て、そういった意味では、Native の先生は発音が良くて、聞きやすかったですし、こちらがいうと大体理解してく
れたので、やっぱり NET の先生に習ったのはよかった、いい経験になったと思います。やはり発音がきれいです
し、こちらの言うことが良く伝わるし、やはり NET は良いと思います。(Mr. Ot)
This student (7) stated in the earlier part of the interview that after he got a job offer from a
trading company, he attended a language school in UCLA in summer. There, he
experienced many European students‟ successful communication without full grammatical
competence which had given him significant understanding of communicative strategies
used by non-native speakers from other countries. However, he agreed with the previous
student in that NETs‟ authentic English is easier to understand than non-native speakers‟
English with accent is. Further, he described the strength of NETs that they understand
non-native speakers‟ deviant English well. Ultimately, for oral skills, he supports learning
from NETs because their immediacy in understanding the students is important for
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professional success. In addition, he found that performance competence by non-native
speakers is more important to use English in convincing ways. Therefore, the doubts about
the quality of NNETS are justified.
The next student (8) supported the idea with reference to authority in NETs.
I agree that NETs have authenticity and students become more attentive in the class.
Japanese students respect NETs, but do not show respect to NNETs. NETs are
professionals who are aware of their responsibilities. Most of all, it is possible to
learn how to think in English with NETs.
やっぱり、そうですね。それはその通りだと思います。Native Speaker だとまず最初に第一に、NET は生徒の方が、
ちゃんと聞きますよ。生徒が、。やはり日本人だったら馬鹿にするでしょうけど、この人なんだろうと思ったりす
るでしょうけど、ふふ、学ぶ方も誠意をもって対忚するでしょうし、教える方もやはりプロフェショナルな人な
のでそういう自覚を持って教えてくれると思うので。やっぱり、なんというか、英語でものを考えるということ
が出来ると思います。(Mr. Ta)
This bilingual student (8) had lived in the UK and attended elementary school since he was
six years old. He said that language problems were the most difficult barrier. (やはり言語面の苦
労が多かったです。やっぱり英語が出来ないと他の科目も出来ないですから。)
He emphasized authenticity in
language that NETs have.
Referring to authentic pronunciation, another student (9) suggests the use of NETs;
I trust teachers with good English pronunciation. I judged quality of English
teachers from their English pronunciation. In this sense, I prefer to learn English
from NETs.
(Ms.Ku)
それは、私は発音というものを自分で意識というか、発音を判断基準としてみていたので、日本人の先生が発音
が上手じゃないと、あまり信用していなかったというか、そういう意味では,Native の先生を好んでいました。
This student (9) said that having authentic pronunciation is prerequisite for English
teachers. Thus, she preferred to learn from NETs. Then, considering English teachers‟
criteria, she implied that, it is important to provide learning models. Therefore, she talked
in a similar vein with the speaker (2) that communicative competence in oral skill requires
accuracy and fluency.
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Now, the data analysis turns to students in disagreement with the idea that NETs are better
than NNETS:
The first student (10) described matters from the point of view of pedagogical feasibility:
The advantage of NNETs is that they speak in the same language with students and
it is easier to understand. By contrast, the advantage of NETs is to experience
native speakers‟ talks. I wish that I had more English conversation class. In reality,
at beginner levels, it is better to teach in both Japanese and English. Gradually, as
students advanced to senior high school, they will be able to cope with
only-English class. By then, it is totally acceptable to learn only in English.
Practically, it is good to learn oral skill from NETs, and writing skill by NNETs.
やはり、日本人の先生ですと、そもそも日本語で英語の授業をするから判るけどしゃべれない。日本人の先生の
いいところはやっぱり日本語で説明してくれるからわかりやすいし、日本人にあった説明の仕方をしてくれる。
NET の先生のいいところはやはり NET の先生の話に触れることが出来る、良くないところはその時間が尐なかっ
た。もう尐し英会話の時間を増やしてほしかった。実際問題として、それが、はじめの段階は日本語と英語をま
ぜたのでいいと思いますが、ある程度、高校生位になって、ある程度お力がついてきたら、英語だけの授業もい
いと思います。全く英語だけでも OK です。日本人の先生は中々英語がしゃべれないから、難しい題もあると思
います。英会話に関してはそうだと思いますが、文法とか読み書きに関しては必ずしもそうではないと思います。
(Ms. No)
In contrast to other female students, this student (10) focuses on experience with the NETs
rather than their authentic skills (e.g. pronunciation). Then, she noted advantages of both
NETs and NNETs in that she considers that the question of efficiency in English study is
less relevant to the dichotomy of NETs or NNETs but rather depends on learners‟ age and
proficiency levels. It may imply that communicative approach does not always help
students in production of linguistic knowledge.
Another student (11) described his preference of teachers:
I prefer leaning from teachers with experiences who are skilful in teaching English
rather than just to be „native speaker‟. For example, my Japanese teacher of English
knows very well how to teach pronunciation because of her learning experience and
conscious efforts. I have no problems learning from NNETs who have good
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teaching experiences.
NET というより、英語を良くわかっていらっしゃる先生ならそれでいいと思います。 例え、私の先生は発音がと
ても良くて、どう発音するべきかを意識的に学ばれているので、そういう人のほうが、無意識に学んでいる人よ
り、こうすればこうなると手順を踏んで教えてもらえるので、きちんと指導できるなら NNETs でもいいと思いま
す。体験がある人に教わりたいので、もし自分が教るなら NNETs でもいいと思います。(Mr. Se)
This English teacher and PhD (12) said that being native is not the only criterion to be the
best teacher and agreed with the student (6) in that, regardless of NETs or NNETs, he
appreciated teachers‟ experience in showing a successful „learning‟ model (i.e. the way to
learn pronunciation). Referring to NNETs who are able to connect with students better than
NETs in their difficulties of learning English, he described students‟ need of instructions
about how to listen and pronounce rather than only aural input. Interestingly, this student is
contrasted to the student (1) who learned listening skills at early age before English study
at junior high school It implies that only aural input is more useful at early age whereas the
explanation about how to listen and pronounce is necessary for higher age. This might
imply that learning listening skills by aural stimuli only is overstated. He believes that it is
possible to strike a pedagogical balance between communication and grammar during
task-based performance by both NETs and NNETs. In addition, he raised another important
matter - the question of motivation- and how NNETs may have more difficulty with
motivating students from his own teaching experience at a private school:
I have hard time to motivate students, because the students are able to advance to
the affiliated university without entrance exams.
実はいま教えているところがエスカレーターで大学まで行かれてしまうところなので、自分自身で教えていて、
どうやって生徒の motivation を高めようかと苦労しています。(Mr. Se)
He (11) explained how in his school students can enter the university with which the
school is linked, without Entrance examinations, and this affected L2 learning behaviour
and motivation.
Another student (12) agreed with the previous student that teachers need training:
I agree with the view that being a native speaker of English is not the only
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condition to be a good English teacher. For example, being an American is not a
condition to be a good teacher.
英語の NET が非常に良いと言うのを否定しているのですか。あーそれはいいんじゃないですか。べつに、Native だ
からと言って、チョッと考えて見ます。例えばアメリカ人だからといって、効果的に日本人に英語を教えられる
とは限らないですね。それは正しいと思います。(Mr.Sa)
This student (12) received a satisfactory training at his integrated high schools and
advanced to Japanese university to study English. From his teaching experience, he said
that the native speaker ideal is a fallacy and he asserted that teachers need to be trained to
attain an idea and skills of L2 teaching. This implied that a teacher is not born but is made
with experience and efforts.
In aforementioned results, there were equal numbers of supports for NETs and NNETs. It
implied that the incentive of cultural and linguistic experience through NETs might be
aligned to support both NETs and NNETs. This also means that the question was difficult
to simply agree or disagree about because the answer depends on goals of students.
Therefore, students described advantages and disadvantage of NETs and NNETS, which
can be summarized as follows:
Summary
This question explored a pedagogical choice of NETs or NNETs. In the view of the
students, the pedagogical conditions of NETs and NNETs differed in the following way: 1)
NETs are able to use authentic English; 2) understand and react faster to students‟ deviant
English than NNETs; 3) integrate the language and culture in enjoyable ways (this is
highlighted by MEXT goals but they did not refer to this). However, 4) NETs fail to check
students‟ comprehension in the class. Importantly, 5) Japanese students have less approval
of non-native accents and appreciate NETs pronunciation models.
By contrast, 6) NNETs‟ deviant pronunciations are recognized by the students. 7) Thus,
NNETs need to use phonological rules strictly during instructions. In addition, 8) the
students at higher age need to have explanations of how to listen and pronounce.
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Conversely, 9) NNETs can share the same learning experience with students and better
connect with students and NNETs can demonstrate learning models. Moreover, 10) the
students preferred to learn from teachers with experience and training – and this applies to
both NETs and NNETS. Finally, 11) the students preferred the teacher to provide a
comfortable environment in classes. In short, in class, NETs appears to have authenticity,
which the students‟ favour but NETs lack in understanding students‟ learning difficulties
while NNETs lack English skills while they emphasize accuracy. Consequently, the
dichotomy of NETs or NNETs may depend in part on age and levels of English proficiency
and their needs.
Indeed, there are always differences in language skills between NETs and NNETs.
However, being a good teacher involves methods, idea, material, and more importantly,
personality of the teacher. NETs can show a model of English, whereas NNETs show a
model of learning. This reflects traditional models of teaching, which expect students to
imitate. In the next question, the author asked about a suitable age for English learning.
1 - c) The belief „the earlier, the better‟
The question of starting language learning at an early age is perennial in educational and
political perspectives as well in that of the general public. Education in the national
language and national cultural are inseparable and the MEXT action to introduce early
English education was slower than that of other Asian countries because there has been
much debate about the possible negative impact of English on learning Japanese language
and culture. This research pursued the issue from a socio-cultural perspective and asked the
students about their views about this popular assumption and the principle established in
the literature and analyzed earlier in this thesis. The aims of this section were 1) to
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establish the students‟ views on including English as a compulsory subject and 2) to
investigate their views on the starting age of English study. Practically, the participants
included four early starters of English study who had lived aboard before the age of six,
including three students who attended an English-speaking school. The results
demonstrated that five students supported the proposition, while three students disagreed
and six students remained uncertain. In line with other sections, this section begins with
students‟ neutral or mixed views.
The first speaker (1) described the importance of mother tongue:
English and Japanese language studies… Let me see, I am not sure if I agree or not
agree. Although English is an important subject, it is more important to master the
mother tongue first. If the second language has a negative influence on the first
language, the priority is wrong.
そうですねぇ。 英語―、国語―、 小学校から導入することに対しては、えー、そうですね、まだ賛成か反対か
はなかなか、えー、意見がないですけど. very clearly ただあることとしては、英語ももちろん大事ですけど、や
っぱり、日本語は日本語ですごくしっかり勉強するべきだと思いますし、そのー。まず自国語をしっかり磨いて、
第一言語として、 その、第二外国語よるという意味では、小学生の段階で、はやり日本語教育、国語教育が疎か
になってしまうのはそれはそれでいかがなものかなと思います。 (Mr. Ot)
This student (1) acknowledged the importance of English. However, he stated that, a
mastery of L1 is the priority. It meant that the development of key skills (i.e. numerical and
literacy) are naturally inseparable from L1 education in compulsory education. He implied
that early acquisition (time) of the mother tongue of their own country (i.e. the birthplace)
is the first priority. Then, I asked him if L1 skills predict L2 skills;
“It may have some effect.
はい、多尐あるかなという気もしますね。(Mr. Ot)
The next student (2) was uncertain about the proposition:
I am not sure…It may be good to start learning English early. English language is
not necessary for our life in Japan. Therefore, we forget what we learn at school
early. I am tutoring a six grader and her mother complained that English study at
elementary school is inadequate because of its shortage of time (i.e. once a week)
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and impractical learning contents such as “This is a piece of chocolate.” It is a
waste of time. It is better to teach basic language skills such as writing the alphabet
and nurture communicative skills by oral practices.
どうなんでしょうね。それでそりゃ早い方がおぼえるのが早いのかもしれませんが. どうしても必然的に英語を使
わなくてはいけないという状況になるとやると思いますけど、今は日本語だけで生きていけるから、英語も、高
校で習ったことも忘れてしまいます。私がいま家庭教師をしている生徒さんが小学校六年生で週一回英語の授業
があるというのですけど、親から見ると全然身についていないといっていて、これがチョコレートですとか、全
然身についていないという、そんなんだったらいらないなと思います。ちゃんと教えてくれるなら小さいところ
から是非、教えてほしかったと思います。やるんだったら週に一回でたりるんですか。やるんだったらちゃんと
一人ひとりに、発言する機会をあたえて、文字もやはり大文字小文字ぐらいかけるぐらいにやって欲しいと思い
ます。(Ms. No)
This student (2) studied International relations and said that L2 communicative skills are
not critical for survival in Japan (this view is in contrast to what MEXT emphasizes though
she did not mention this). Consequently, she considered that the consolidated effort for
early language education might be wasted. However, from her English teaching experience,
she said that, some parents consider that the current teaching time and materials at
Japanese elementary school are inadequate. Then, she suggested teaching practical skills
by getting them to express their idea in writing or use communicative activities in English.
The next student (3) is an early starter and emphasizes the question of anxiety – which was
also raised in the previous question regarding NETS and NNETs:
The assumption underlying the early language education to reduce students‟
anxieties of English study in later days is valid. However, to tell my embarrassing
experience of my early learning, I still cannot distinguish phonemes of /l/ and /r/
although I can hear my own. From this, I assume that, the early learning of English
does not give advantages to students‟ English proficiency in EFL environment
unless students keep learning by themselves. Therefore, in Japanese school, unless
students have English lesson more than three days a week, it is difficult to meet the
advantages of the critical period and the concerted efforts for early education may
end up in half way.
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さっき言ったように、抵抗が尐なくするという意味では早い始めるのはいいのかもしれませんけど。えーとです
ね、恥ずかしい話ですが、L と R は、自分で発音ができるのですが、実は、聞いていて今の L か R といわれると、
はっきり、それほど区別がつかないのですね。それで、さっき、幼稚園からやっていて、L か R の区別が、自分
では区別できるのですけど、でも、人がやっていると区別がつかない。自分の経験から言うと、あのー、昔から
やっていても、さっき言ったように、週一回とか、途中でやめてしまうと、上手く行かないのであれば、EFL 環
境で、ものすごくたくさん小学校で英語に接ないと、多分そういうのに上手くならないと思うので、それだけた
くさん英語の時間があるならいいのですけど、今のように週三回くらいだったら中途半端に終わってしまうので、
あの、えー、臨界期は、今の状況では獲得できないのではないかと思います。(Mr. Se)
This student (3) said that, despite his early learning, he failed to hear phonemes. Again, as
we saw in the discussion of NETs and NNETS, the question of pronunciation worries
students a lot. It implies difficulties of hearing „perception blind spots (Lado, 1957:11)‟,
which frequently agitate Japanese learners. Ultimately, he said that L2 learners need to
have continuous language learning environments or English exposure outside school. For
example, learners would make use of media (e.g. TV) to develop language proficiency. In
term of language stimuli, his English at kindergarten did not teach the alphabet. He also
agreed with the previous student that the current curriculum in Japanese schools is not
adequate to develop language skills. For example, there is lack of English lessons to meet
the advantages of the critical period. Thus, the students (2, 3) suggested reconsidering the
elementary school English curriculum.
Similarly, the engineering student (4) described productive skills:
My research topic deals with developing the system to evaluate the Japanese
accents spoken by non-native speakers. Some pitch patterns in Japanese language
are very difficult for some foreigners because of a flat melody in Japanese.
Japanese language is particularly difficult for English speakers. Let me see, for
early learning, although it may have some positive effects, but early English
education might influence learners‟ ideas or L1 culture.
日本語のアクセントについて、日本語のピッチパターンで、外国人が発声した時に尐し変になる。それを自動で
評価する仕組みを作ろうと、という研究をやろうと思っています。はい、日本語のピッチパターンです。はい、
それに使えるようなものを作りたいと思います。そう、なかなか難しいパターンがあるようです。どうしても平
板型が一番難しい。あー、英語話者にとっては一番難しいみたいです。 うーん、そうですね。まー。早い方が身
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につくのは早いかもしれませんが、思考に対しての影響とか、文化的なものへの影響があります。(Mr. Ka)
This student (4)‟s research topic is to assess Japanese pronunciation spoken by non-native
learners of Japanese. He spoke from the engineering perspective that pronunciation is
equally difficult for non-native speakers and agreed with the previous student (3) that the
notion of difficulties of English learning might derive from gaps between L1 and L2acoustic features which is a common problem to other language learners (i.e. Japanese
language learning for English native speakers). These students (3, 4) agreed that
difficulties of English might be obvious in pronunciation and implied that the initial age of
learning could be identified from learners‟ pronunciation. In short, the results revealed that
earlier English start might promise better pronunciation, but EFL could be need to prevent
disappointing results (e.g. inter-language).
Now, in contrast to the aforementioned students, the data analysis will look at the data
from the students who supported early education.
The next student (5) reflected on her early learning:
I think that, early language learning, let us say at kindergarten, may not determine
future language skills. However, experience of having contacts with native speakers
at an early age is good to develop awareness of different cultures. For example,
early exposure to English speaking people nurture motivation to study English or
alleviate anxieties toward language learning. Consequently, having exposure to a
different culture at a young age might contribute to affective domains for language
learning. Therefore, I think it is good to start learning English as a compulsory
subject from the first grade of elementary school. Kindergarten is a place to enjoy.
そうですね。私はすごく小さい時に英語をやってもそれが将来の英語力に直接繋がるとは余り考えていないので
すよ。まー幼稚園とかそういうレベルでやっていても。ただ、その時に外国文化に触れるとか、外国人に会うと
かそういった経験は残ると思います。そこで得た外国人に対してアレルギーがなくなるとか、外国の文化は面白
いとかそういったものは英語力を上げる Motivation になるという意味では早期英語教育は意味があると思います
けど。私は小学校一年生から始めるのがいいとと思います。幼稚園というのは遊ぶところですし、小学校の義務
教育が始まると同時に国語とか算数とかとか理科とかといった教科と同等に習って、最初は簡単なものから始め
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てほかの教科と同等にはじめていったらいいんじゃないかと思います。(Ms. Za)
This early starter (5) began learning English from the first year at private elementary
school onward but her early education did not develop language skills, as we shall discuss
in research question 9. Although she supported the previous students (3.4) in that early
learning of English does not promise English fluency she supported early learning because,
owing to her early English learning experience, she became familiar with cultures of
English speaking countries and has enjoyed her English study. Again as in the previous
section, the question of anxiety appears here. As there are a number of the students who
support early education, there might be something in there. This student raised a
relationship between language and culture because her early learning experience gathered
her communicative competence with people from different cultures. It implied that
language education and culture learning are inseparable. It would suggest, and could
answer to the previous student‟s (4) worry, that English exposure at early age had a
positive effect on her cognition. Then, she suggested that it is desirable to include culture
knowledge in English curriculum. In order to make early learning more effective, she
suggested teaching English as a compulsory subject along with other core subjects.
The next student (6) is a returnee to Japan, having spent some years in the UK.
From my early experience, I agree with early education. I think it is good to learn
English between the ages of 6 to 10 years intensively for memory retention.
However, the earlier they learn, the earlier they forget the language in EFL
environment.
それはやはり自分自身もそう思いますね、自分自身の経験からいって、多分、一番、6 歳から 10 歳ぐらいの間に
英語とか語学をびしびしやった方が覚えやすいと思いますね。そう思うとやはり小さい時は得るのも早いけど、
失うのも早いと思います。(Mr. Ta)
This student (6) arrived to the U. K. at the age of nine years (僕は 9 歳の時から海外に行っていたので)
and keeps his language skills while his sister who arrived in the U.K. a few months old and
left the country at the age of six could not keep her L2 skill. He agreed with the
aforementioned students that the principle has good effects as an experience. However, he
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is in line with the student (5) that early English learning does not promise English
proficiency. However, like another student earlier he also says that what is learnt early can
be easily forgotten and refers to his sister‟s experience of this:
I have a sister nine years younger than me. She began attending a nursery school
four years after arrival in the U.K. and later attended a reception year 1. At that
time, my sister used to speak perfect English and we talked in English all the time.
Strangely, she understood Japanese from our parents. Her English pronunciation
and gestures used to be like British. She was only six months old and a little baby
when our family arrived to the U.K. My sister only ate English food such as fried
food. My sister spent a lot of time with her English nanny and was surrounded by
English speaking people. Her English pronunciation and gestures used to be like
British. Then, after four and half years in the U.K., our family moved to Thailand,
and my sister entered Japanese kindergartens and she spent a lot of time with
Japanese friends. My parent made this decision for her future life in Japan and out
of financial considerations. Within a very short time, she lost her English skill. If
we learn the language, too early, English skills disappear quickly. I sometimes
speak to her in English. She now lives in Japan and does not remember that she was
able to speak English. Our family speaks Japanese. I sometimes speak to her in
English. From this family experience, I think that early exposure to English does
not provide speaking skill. Ultimately, it is difficult to develop communicative
skills in English at Japanese school. My parents sent her to Japanese kindergarten
because of financial reasons and the family prospect to return to Japan.
ただ一の妹がいるのですが、九つはなれた妹がいるのですが、イギリスに行ってちょうど 4 年目ぐらいで現地の
Primary school の Year 1 、Reception にいって、Year 1 にはいる前の Year 1 に行って、それまで彼女は現地のN
urseryに行っていて、で、彼女は英語が完璧にぺらぺらで、日本語がほとんど出来なくて、家ではずっと
英語でしゃべっていて、僕と英語でしゃべっていて、ただなんか不思議なことに、日本語で親が何か言うとそれ
は判るらしいんです。わかって、答は英語で返ってくるのです。彼女は発音とか動きとかすべて外国人を真似て
完全に溶け込んでいたのです。生まれてから半年、赤ちゃんでした。食べ物も揚げ物みたいな物しか食べなかっ
たし、二歳ぐらいからイギリスの乳母さんみたいな人に預けられていたのですが、周りがイギリス人じゃないで
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すか。だから英語でずっとやっていて。それからタイに帰って、日本人の社会とばかり付き合っていて、日本の
幼稚園に行って、そしたら英語なんかすぐに忘れちゃって、今度は日本語でしか言えなくなって。そう思うとや
はり小さい時は得るのも早いけど、失うのも早いと思います。はい、英語は全く出来なくなって、今は日本に住
んでいて、今、英語を出来た事ですら覚えていないです。日本語です。でも僕と妹と二人になった時、英語を使
います。そう考えると、日本の小学校で英語をやるのも一緒で、周りの人が全部日本人だと日本人同士が英語で
コミュニケーションをとるのは難しいと思います。あまりしゃべれるようにならないと思います。それはやはり
日本に帰る事を見越して、日本語を学ばせないと日本で苦労するなと思ったと思います。あとやはり金銭的な意
味もあると思います。日本に帰ってインターナショナルスクールへ行かせるのはものすごくお金がかかると思う
ので、やはり現実的に日本の学校に行った方がいいと思ったと思います。(Mr. Ta)
He (6) said that English skills - in particular for oral skills - derived from early exposure to
English does not remain without maintenance from the environment and a desire to
maintain the skills. This student agreed with the student (3. 5) that the positive evidence of
critical period needs to consider starting ages and levels of exposure outside class.Finally,
he was concerned that language education is related to socio-economics in that students
need parental support to maintain English skills at early age. Although the overwhelming
majority of the students so far support the earlier learning, earlier learning has numerous
problems. The next female returnee (7) described the advantages and disadvantages and
agreed about the experience of forgetting:
I lived in the U.K. from the age of one, attended kindergarten, and returned to Japan
too young to keep my language skills. I was fluent in English until I was a
kindergartner. However, after returning to Japan, I lost all lexical and syntactical
fluency that I had in the U.K., but my English pronunciation is better than other
students‟ are. Realistically, my English study began from scratch at junior high
school. I envy returnees who have English skills. Nevertheless, I was lucky to have
a living experience in the U.K. because I enjoyed learning English at school. Thus,
I support teaching English at elementary school. I appreciate the native-like English
pronunciation and wish to provide pronunciation instructions. I do not think it is
necessary to include syntactic knowledge for young ages. Therefore, I think it is
good to focus on oral skill (e.g. phrase repeating) and add writing skills for
subordinate information.
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イギリスにいた時は自然と多分話せるようになって. 帰ってきたのが早かったので、そのあとに外国に住んでい
て帰ってきた人がいて、残っているんですよね、そういうのをみてうらやましいなーと思って。結局、時期が遅
いほうがよく残っているし、そういうのを見て羨ましいなと思ったり、思って、長くいれば良かったかなーとい
うと、そうでもなくって。小学校の間、英語を使ったことがないので、やはり一度休憩期間が出来たということ
で、文法だったり、単語とかはそういった知識はリセットされて、中学校の普通の勉強として始まったと思う。
うーん。まー、早い、個人的にも小さい頃から英語を触れる機会があったからこそ中学校から抵抗感なく英語の
勉強が出来てきたので、そのー、英語に触れる機会が小学校からあるのは意味があるのかなと思います。そうで
すね、それと、私は発音をこだわってきた方なので、なるべく柔軟なうちに NS の発音に触れることはいいことな
のかという印象です。ただ、文法だったり単語だったり、そういった細かい知識的なこと側面を覚えれば何とか
なるということを小さい頃からする必要がなくて、それは中学校に入ってから十分出来ると思います。そのー、
発音の部分は実際に小さい時から聞いていたことで、秀でている部分があって、それによって、それに英語に対
しての苦手意識だとかそういったものがほとんどなかったので、それで、個人的にいやだとか、まー、気が楽だ
とか、英語嫌いにならずにやってこれたのがで行って良かったと思いますね。単語を覚えるよりは会話形式だっ
たり、リピートとかフレーズというか、短い会話の繰り返しでもいいと思いますが、そういう、Speaking が中心
で、それに追加として文字情報があればいいかと(Ms. Hi)
This student (7) had a long interval before she began learning English at junior high school.
First, her opinion is consistent with the proceeding student (6) that it is difficult to maintain
linguistic fluency in EFL environment. It implied that the effects of early language skills
depend on levels of exposure. Secondly, she agreed with the student (4) in that differences
of learning duration were obvious in L2 pronunciation. It may suggest that a language
history is vividly reflected in skill in pronunciation. Then, her experience confirmed the
student (5)‟s view in that L2 there are isometric relations between culture and language. In
terms of intelligibility in language, she emphasized fluency rather than accuracy at early
age.
Consequently, she has enjoyed English study and English became her highest scoring
subject to study pharmacology at the university (英語は得点元だったので、英語の受験の勉強をするのはす
きでしたし。). It
meant that early language education might affect self-efficacy (e.g. students‟
learning and identities). Lastly, in order to improve early English education, she suggested
teaching pronunciation at EFL in primary school. Interestingly, most of the students in this
study talked about pronunciation, which might mean that Japanese students were in favour
of native-like pronunciation.
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In short, the students who supported the principle explained that although early linguistic
memory declines, their experience might remain to be significant in later life. Now we
shall look at the views of students, which expressed a clear disagreement with an early L2
education.
The first student (8) described the limits of the early language education:
I do not agree with the principle. I have many bilingual friends but none of them
is a perfect bilingual speaker. A ratio of their language skills between L1 and L2
would be 80 to 20 at its best. Japanese students are busy studying L1 „i.e. kokugo‟
and it is better to start learning English from 10 years old.
そう思いません。私は Bilingual の友達を多く持っていますが、ほとんどの人がどちらつかずで、片方が perfect
だったらもう片方が不完全だったり、一番良くても80:20ぐらいだと思います。だから、両方とも完全に
出来る人はいません。だから日本人だったら日本語で覚えることが一杯あるので、10 歳ぐらいでいいと思いま
す。(Ms. Ku)
In theory, she (8) claimed that bi/multilingualism is not possible. In terms of bilingualism,
some students with mixed parents and they are native speakers of more than language
while other bilingual students are monolingual speakers at home and study in English at
school (e.g. student 6). In terms of fluency, whether they are native, or one or more
language speakers, she considered that, it is impossible to have equal fluency in two
languages. It appears to be a grand saga whether perfect bilingualism – i.e. equal
proficiency in both languages - is possible or not. For example, Davies (2003:211)
considers that, although it is rare, it is possible to master more than one language. Secondly,
this student (8) agreed with the student (1) in that an early L2 learning might affect mastery
of a mother tongue (e.g. mastery of Kanji). It means that L2 acquisition at early age might
delay L1 mastery.
The other student (9) described a goal of primary education:
I think kokugo is more important. If you chase two, you will lose both.
日本語を先にやるべきだと思いますね。というのは、やっぱり二つのことを同時にやろうとして、できる人はい
105
いのですが、同じことを言って申し訳ないですけど、
(Mr. Ha)
This student (9)‟s view is congruent with the proceeding student (8)‟s opinion in that it is
difficult to achieve two goals equally at one time. “Kokugo” literally means “a national
language” used by the majority of ethnic group of a country and is „Japanese language‟
taught as a mother tongue. Every student enrolling schools under MEXT jurisdiction have
to learn Kokugo including roughly 2000 (e.g. 1006 in primary school, 939 in junior high
school) and grammar to acquire literacy of their national language (i.e. L1). Students are
expected to have Kanji test every few weeks for which students use memory strategy to
practice them. In reality, numerous compounded nouns and verbs - nearly 3000 kanji are
necessary for fluent reading of Japanese newspaper. Drawing on this, in the next question
(d), this student (9) will describe how the complexity of Japanese language makes it
difficult to operate in computer system. He implied that “A man who chases two horses
will miss both.”
It may suggest that language skills require confidence and identity, which is maintained in
L1.
Another student (10) also disagreed:
I often hear the theory of critical period but I am not sure if L2 learning abilities
decline by age. I began learning English at Junior high school and it was not too
late. From my experience to learn English from Junior high school, it was early
enough. However, this is my experience and it may not apply to all other students.
As for myself, junior high school is good.
どうなんでしょう。よく SLA とかで臨界期仮説がありますが、そのー、母語の取得と第二言語の習得とは、早い
方が良いって、それって本当ですかね。そうねー。早いからー。私なんかは本格的にやったのは中学生からです
けどね、それからでも十分間に合ったと言う経験があったのでね。でも個人的な経験があったからと言って、ほ
かの人に当てはまると言うことはないですよね。私の場合は個人的な経験で中学生からで十分間に合った。(Mr. Sa)
This student (10) studied English in Japanese school and earned numerous successful
records in achievement tests (i.e. TOEFL). While he agreed about advantages of early start
106
of English education, he is more sceptical about employing early English education
because he was able to achieve successful results in achievement tests without English
exposure in his life. Nonetheless, he cannot clearly see the need of an adoption of the early
English education. In sum, it may suggests that, although the student does not see the
measurable impacts of early learning on production of English language, some advantage
of early learning could appear in later days. Hereafter the author summarize if there are any
plausible explanations to justify early learning.
Summary
This section looked at the students‟ experiences and opinions about the implementation of
early language education. Most of the students are aware of advantages of early learning
on motivation. However, several contrasting views were uncovered with regard to the ideal
starting age of L2 learning.
The advantages of the principle extracted from the students‟ views include; 1) nurture
positive self-efficacy, 2) motivation and 3) interests in different cultures. In another words,
the results of this study reveal that students see that L2 learning and culture are bounded.
As of language skills, 4) the difference between early starters and later starters remain in
their pronunciation. It implies that early starters hear language.
In contrast, the disadvantages of early education are 1) negative influence or delaying of
L1 development, 2) that might affect identity because it is transferred through language at
early age. In other words, Japanese students are busy in mastering L1 writing i.e. a mixture
of four separate orthographical forms, hiragana, „katanaga‟, „romaji‟, and „kanji‟ by
repetitions and memory strategies which is time consuming and may influence both L1 and
L2 productions. Then, 4) the students (4, 5, 6) suggested that English exposure at early age
might confer students‟ identification which provides motivational base for learning the L2
rather than identification with integrative-ness to a particular groups of target language
107
(Ushioda, 2008:150).
In sum, the achievement of early learning depends on culture environments, which
involves socio-economic. It is noticeable those students were very concerned about
pronunciation and that there are indications of the differences between younger and late
starters in pronunciation as well as lack of anxiety, another concept, which appears
frequently in the previous section as well as this. However, some students pointed out that
their lack clear prospects for the implementation of L2 at elementary school in Japan. One
doubt is about culture and language in that early learning of L2 might impede identity and
L1 proficiency. This is related to the teaching materials, which are followed by the next
section in which the author discuss about the goal of English as a lingua franca or Standard
English.
1 - d) English as a lingua franca or Standard English
In this study, „Standard English‟ refers to a codified form of English spoken in native
English speaking countries, namely in the U.K. and the U.S.A., whereas „English as a
lingua franca‟ was first conceptualized as English spoken by non-native English speakers
in the outer circle (e.g. West Africa) or expanding circle (e.g. countries in Asia and the EU
(Kashru, in Quirk et al. 1985:12). English as a lingua franca (henceforth LF) has spread
around the world through migration, economic exchange, and access to digital
communications. Seidlhofer (2011:7) refers to LF as “any use of English among speakers
of different first languages for whom English is the communicative medium of choice, and
often the only option”. Jenkins, Cogo, Dewey (2011) point out that English as LF and EFL
are distinct as the former is a phenomenon of global English use, while the latter is a
phenomenon in modern languages that attempts to approximate the native use of English.
Most countries are multilingual today. Moreover, the global use of the lingua franca gives
108
rise to questions related to interpretation and authenticity of the English language.
However, despite these developments, the students‟ voices of LF, discussed below, are still
more similar to be the traditional definition.
During the interviews, the author asked the students if they were happy with the current
learning goal of Standard English at school or whether non-Standard English or English as
a lingua franca should be included. Establishing a clear goal is quintessential for any
program of learning, and the issue is important for English teaching and its assessment.
The interview data shows that six students supported learning Standard English (SE), while
one student was in favour of LF and seven students were neutral. Some students were also
asked an additional question about the dichotomy of communicative versus grammar
approach. There were reasons for this extra question.
First, during the interview, I
discovered that the term “LF” was unfamiliar to some students; secondly, the students‟ EFL
lessons had been to learn accuracy in SE, which is termed as Jyuken-eigo or Nyushi-eigo.
As a student said, Nyushi-eigo is one variety of English.
日本の受験英語も英語ですからね。Sa.
Hence, I began to feel uncomfortable asking this question of students who had no choice in
their learning. However, given the multilingual situation around the world, this question is
still important. I was therefore not able to account fully for the students‟ situation, taking
into account various forces (e.g. political, social, and economical). Still, I trusted that the
situation would not affect the result of the research question.
Now, before reporting the results in detail, this section starts by introducing the students‟
accounts of English as a world language. The student (1) stated as below:
The use of Esperanto as a world language is not possible today. Naturally, the
spread of English is unavoidable. I think the current spread of English started as the
result of rapid development of communication technology. The technology requires
communication protocols to transmit texts to the other side of the world. There are
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three compelling reasons to explain why English dominates computer operating
systems: 1) at the time when technology saw rapid advancement, English was used
in the U.S.A. – which was the strongest country of the world (i.e. strongly armed by
economic, military and political forces). If Korea was a world economic power then,
Korean language (Hangul) could have been the world language. 2) The computer
system was running in English language at that time. 3) English won the race over
other languages partly because of its use of phonograms. Although the Soviet
Union was one of the world powers, the Russian language could not be the world
language because of its use of symbolic letters. Symbolic letters take more time to
process on line. Similarly, a disadvantage of the Japanese language for operation
system is clear because Japanese language use symbolic letters. It was only after
introduction of Window Vista in 2004 that kanji characters (i.e. symbolic letter)
became manageable on the computer.
自分はどちらかというと、情報網の発達が大きかったのではと思います。今は世界の裏側にも、今、簡単に電話
できるようになったではないですか。そういうつながりが広まった時になにか共同のプロトコールが必要になっ
た。となったときに一番の強国であったアメリカの共用語であり公用語である英語が必然的に広まっていったの
ではないかと思います。まー。コンピューターは英語で動いていたんです。あと、その、あまりにも、やっぱり
英語以外の文字はコンピューターを扱うのは不利だったということだともいます。例えば、かりに韓国がアメリ
カの立場だったら、ハングル文字を使っていたらハングルだったら単純に世界語になれたんじゃないですか。ハ
ングルのようなああいう文字(symbolic character)文字だったらね。その文字構造が使えるようになったのは Window
のビスタからなんです。 (Mr. Ha)
This student (1) studying acoustic engineering explained his views from the engineering
perspective and attributed the spread of English around the world to technical development
in the past twenty years. Further, this historical change is reinforced by the economic
power that the U.S.A. enjoyed. In addition, English is suited for the computer system
because it uses a phonetic alphabet. Considering the world history, he asserted that the
situation is a natural consequence. Then, he said that as people, and even more so,
countries, tend to resist change. As a result, English as a world language fulfils an essential
need. I asked him if this situation benefits the U.S.A.
110
Given that, the U.S.A. benefits considerably from the use of English, English
language further benefits other countries as well. Therefore, it is not problematic.
確かに得はしていると思いますが、それ以上に他の国も得することがあると思うのでかまわないと思います。
(Mr.Ha)
His answer returned to a student‟s perspective who receives benefit of English from digital
information. Other students also expressed positive views of the spread of English around
the world:
The spread of English language worldwide is a natural phenomenon and I do not
mind about its spread. Native English speaking countries have advantage from this
spread, but other countries also have benefits from the spread of English language.
えーーと、英語が広まるというのは、なんというか、世界の流れなので別にかまわないと思います。確かに特は
していると思いますが、それ以上に他の国も得をすることがあると思うのでかまわないと思います。 (Mr. Su)
Overall, these views illuminate many students‟ views in this study that the social
implication of the spread of English as either a LF or SE is favourable. This is a way of
developing economic cooperation and LF helps industrial collaboration i.e. division of
labour and distribution of products around the world. I further discuss this issue in question
7.
Then, data analysis turns to the neutral views. The student (2) lived in the U.K. from the
age one to six.
Learners‟ skill to distinguish varieties of non-standard English is useful in
interactive situations. The priorities depend on the students‟ goals. Once a goal is
set for communicative skills, it is desirable to introduce LF for speaking.
それはたしかに、使い分ければ意味がある。何の為に英語を勉強するかという、最初の目的が、例えば Interactive
に英語を勉強するというも目的にあるならば、結局そういう実際に話すことが重視されるべきー。 (Ms. Ht)
Clearly, this student (2) values skills of being able to distinguish different LF
pronunciations. However, she stated that, whether to include LF in curriculum depends on
goals. She may have had in mind that in reality, a current focus in Japanese school is
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reading skills notably for entrance examinations and the objective of English study is not
straightforward in Japanese schools. Ultimately, she pointed out mismatches between two
different academic goals (i.e. SE for academic and LF for social needs).
The next student (3) also agreed with the proceeding student (2).
Non-native speakers‟ English such as students from Spain and France were difficult
to understand partly because we were still at the learning stage. Seemingly, I
acknowledged that I learn a lot of English grammar through preparations for
entrance exams. Then, I proved this feeling in UCLA. However, I saw European
students using English well without linguistic accuracies. Then, I began to think
that it is acceptable to speak English with some grammatical mistakes.
やっぱフランス人とかスペイン人に、まー、勿論学生で英語がぺらぺらじゃないということもありますけど、な
かなか通じづらいということがあって。やはり受験勉強で文法に関してすごく磨き上げられたなということをす
ごく感じます。UCLA へ行っていても、やはり、文法に関して日本人が一番出来ているというすごく感じました。
やっぱり、かといって文法が出来なくても、やっぱり、ヨーロッパ人というのはぺらぺらしゃべっていて、だか
ら、そのー、communication という意味では、もうちょっと文法がめちゃめちゃでも大丈夫なのかなーというのを
すごい感じました。(Ms. Ot)
This student (3) studied English at UCLA one month before the interview took place and
described his oral skills in relation to LF users (i.e. European students). He thought that
European students‟ English was difficult to understand when adapting different dialects in
speaking. It implies that LF creates problems in comprehension owing to its use of dialects
in pronunciation and incorrect grammar. However, he was surprised that the non-native
speakers from European countries are good at English communication despite using
incorrect grammar. Ultimately, he realized that grammatical competence of Japanese
students was high but overshadowed by lack of communicative skills in English.
Nevertheless, he did not recommend teaching LF. It may suggest that due to a lack of
English exposure in Japan, students do not have image of target language speakers (i.e.
neither English speakers nor native speakers or lingua franca speaker) which makes it
difficult to set a realistic goal (i.e. lingua franca or Standard English). Nevertheless, as he
stated, Japanese focus on reading skills of Standard English.
112
The next student (4) talked about his experience of LF speakers:
When
I made language errors,
Miscommunication
in
English...
I wanted
In
to
Bangladesh,
stop
speaking
difficulties
in
English.
English
communication … let me see… English with accent, My English skill is not
enough to distinguish English variations… then, how Englishes were different…I
cannot explain well. But was able to understand English in Bangladesh. The
difficulty came from my lack of vocabulary knowledge rather than pronunciation
with accent.
いつも間違えると話す気がなくなる。ミスコミニケーション。えーと、バングラチッシュ人の話す英語で判りに
くかったところですか。うーん、そうですね。
・やっぱり訛りといってしまうのですけど、そこまで、僕は普通の
英語でも完璧ではないので、苦手なので、どこがどういう風になまっていたと言うのは、明確に説明できないの
ですけど、僕でもわかるぐらいの訛り具合と言うか、うーん、いや、Vocabulary の面の方が多かったと思います。
(Mr. Na)
This student (4)‟s answer was not entirely clear. However, he agreed with the previous
student (3) that he tries to use accurate grammar in speaking. He stated that language errors
de-motivated him to speak English. He reveals that, despite his efforts to learn English, he
could not successfully establish connections with his English Knowledge and
communicative skills. Secondly, he described that difficulties in English come from a lack
of lexical knowledge rather than pronunciation. Consequently, this student was
disappointed that, he was not able to express his ideas. Bearing these students (2, 3, 4) in
mind, it suggests that communicative confidence may reside at the heart of a speaker,
which derives from awareness of current English as EIL.
The next speaker (5) described difficulties in English grammar:
Let me see, how I shall say...I wish to have simplified forms of English from
Standard English to the extent that there is no miscommunication. Then, it is easier
113
to use English.
そうですね。うーん。英語をスタンダードを通して、世界基準として作られるといいのでないかと。そうですね、
ビジネスなんかのシーンで事故が起きない程度で、ある程度簡略化された英語が許されるなら、もっと使いやす
くなっていくと思います。(Ms. Ho)
Firstly, this successful learner of English (5) was uncertain about the question and
addressed difficulties in mastering grammar rules at school. This student is in line with the
other students (2, 3, 4) that grammatical difficulties de-motivate students to learn English.
Secondly, the student (5) appears to point out that language learning takes time by saying
„busy people‟. Consequently, she wished to have simplified forms of English grammar
derived from Standard English. Certainly, the question was rather difficult to answer for
the students who studied SE for many years at school, and possibly will use English at
work in the near future in Japan. The students (3, 4, 5) said that language learning in
isolation does not create communicative skills. Clearly, there is a need to help the students
to improve their attitudes toward communicative skills.
A bilingual student (6) described the question of authenticity of English:
I always wished to learn authentic English. It was good experience to learn from
British Teachers. I do not think English spoken by native speakers is necessarily
correct English. In addition, there are increasing numbers of non-native speakers
around the world. Therefore, learning SE may not be sufficient. It is good to
include some LF as listening or reading materials in the course. Furthermore, one
could invite LF speakers to practice LF. For example, in Hamamatsu City, there are
South American, mostly Brazilian, immigrants who are native Portuguese speakers
and whose English can enrich the learning experience of a Japanese student.
余り関係ないのかもしれないですけど、英語を習うのなら、きちんとした英語を習いたいと思っていました。そ
うですね、うーん、正しい英語がそもそもあるのかというところに問題がありますよね。Native Speaker がしゃべ
っている英語が正しい英語かというと、本当はそうじゃないと思います。権力みたいなものと言語が関係あると
思うので、やっぱり、はは、どうしても、外国人の先生に英語を習うのは余り良くないと思います。イギリスの
114
先生に教えていただいた英語の方が効果的だったと思います。これからは、英語を話す相手も非英米圏からの人
がほとんどとなるでしょう。これは、一生涯日本に住み続ける人、海外に出て行く人に共通していえることです。
だから学校でもいわゆるネイティブの発音だけを聞いても十分ではないと思います。リスニング教材にはそうい
った非ネイティブたちの、話す物を入れても面白いかもしれません。またその学校の地域特性に会った外国人と
の英語による交流を促進しても良いのではないでしょうか。例えば日系南米人の多くすむ浜松などではポルトガ
ル訛りの英語を話す人たちと交流したり、インド系の多くすむ地域ではそういう人たちと話すなどです。そうい
った実践で使える英語の体得と、普通の Grammar や読解もあわせて行っていくとより効果的であると思います。
(Mr. Ta)
This returnee (6) lived in the U.K. for four and a half years and later moved to Thailand,
and attended a British school for four years and half. After nine years education in English,
he entered a Japanese university. Meanwhile, he saw NETs in the U.K. school and NETs
from the outer circle at an international school and became aware of diaglossic situations.
He recommended introducing LF as an addition to the teaching material.
By contrast, a female returnee (7) supported teaching communicative English
I think it is important to teach communicative English. I entered an American
school at the first year in elementary school and I did not learn English as a school
subject until I entered to the Japanese university. Therefore my opinion is rather
objective. From my experience in teaching English to Japanese students, I think
that Japanese students consider English as a subject to study. However, English is a
tool of communication. Therefore, LF is acceptable for speaking. At the university,
I am attending oral communication class for the first time in my life. During the
lesson, although there are individual differences in their personality and place of
birth, many Japanese students feel apprehensive about speaking English because of
their desire to be perfect. While students are thinking how to say and what to say,
the conversation proceeds. I do not know if there is any correct English
pronunciation. There are many LF speakers whose communicative competence is
good. Low proficiency in speaking among Japanese students could derive from
their mental constructs.
115
はい、はい、私は、そうですね。なんか、伝わる英語を話すことをすごく重点的にやるのがいいのではないかと
思っていて正確な英語というのは、私の印象なんですけど。私は日本で英語を習っていないので外部からの意見
なんですけど、私は家庭教師で、日本の高校生の英語を補助することがあるんですけど、そういうのを通して思
うことは、とても正確に話すことに対して固執しているようなんですけど、英語というとなんか学科のように聞
こえるんですけど、結局、英語は結局言葉なので、伝わればいいと思います。考えているうちに会話は進んでい
くので。そういう意味で、そういう教育が推進されていればいいと思います。私は始めて大学に入って初めて英
語教育を受けているんですけど。それで、普通の必修ですので、それで、普通の英語教育を受けてきた人と一緒
に勉強をしているんですけど、スピーキングのクラスなどにいると、すごく思うことは、個人差がありますけど、
出身地とか個人差があると思いますけど、間違えないかということを考えていて、話せない人が多いと思うんで
すよ。それで会話ってどんどん進んでいくんですよね。それでこれはこれかとこう言えばいいかああいえばと思
っているうちに会話が進んでいったり、中々言い出すせないんだと思っているうちに会話が進んでいく訳ですか
ら。そんな風に思わないです。そもそも正しい発音はなんだということになりますが。スタンダードな英語が自
分の母国でない人が多いと思うんです。それで彼らがコミニケーション能力がないかというとそうではないと思
うんです。多分ないと思います。(Ms. To)
This returnee (7) studied at an international school from the second year of the primary
school to the graduation with teachers and students from outer circles. In question (f), she
agreed with the proceeding student (6) that it is difficult to define native norms of English.
Then, she is in line with student (3, 5, 6) that Japanese students appear to spend a long time
just forming accurate English and by that time, the opportunity of speaking often just goes
away. It means that Japanese students have different attitudes from other non-native
speakers toward the use of English in intercultural situation. It may suggest Japanese
students‟ desire to be perfect might be linked to saving face. It might mean, “Learners may
develop cultural expectations of the language classroom. It is part of the classroom culture
(Seliger, H. (1991 in eds. Malave et al. 1991:39). Then, it raises an issue of whether error
correction is better or not in class. Concomitantly, she supports teaching LF to focus on
communicative skills by creating more comfortable atmosphere in class
The preceding data showed that the „neutral‟ students had mixed views about the
introduction of LF while one student was clear about the need to teach communicative
skills at school. The analysis will now turn to the data from the students who prefer to learn
SE at school.
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A student (8) learnt English from elementary school onward in Japan:
The global spread of English is irreversible reality today and the assumption
underlying its value is not in question. However, this notion of English around the
world does not imply that native speakers of English do not need to study foreign
language. It is important to have multiple views of the world that we can learn from
different languages. Teaching accurate knowledge is important in education.
Students can be exposed to English outside school and it is possible to
communicate in English with some language errors. However, if discourses contain
too many grammar mistakes or pronunciation errors, it is difficult to understand it.
Therefore, it is important to teach foundational knowledge (i.e. grammar rules and
pronunciation) at school. In this sense, rote learning is essential to some degree.
Then, the learner can use this knowledge for communicative purposes.
もうそれは帰られない事なので、別に英語が世界の言葉として使われている事が結う書されるべきではないと思
います。でもだからといって NET が英語以外の言葉を学ばなくていいと、違うかなっと思っていて、やはり彼ら
も他の言語を学ぼう、多様性を持とうという意識を持つというのは、やはり大事な事だと思います。教育の部分
では正確さというのは大事だと思いますよ。あのー、なぜかというと、伝わればいい問いのは、教育の部分でな
くて。やっぱり話すことは大事なんですけど、どうしても基礎がないとしゃべれないですし、細かい文法は多尐
間違えても通じるじゃないですか。でも余りに文法が間違っていたり発音が違ったりするとやはり通じないです
ね。ですから小学校や中学校の知識は基礎的なことですし、そこはある程度暗記が必要ですし、それからそれを
使って Communication ができるようになって行けば、実際の中でできるようになればいいと思います。(Ms. Za)
At the beginning of this quote, this student (8) talked about the role of foreign language
study in the global era and suggested the value of learning different views through other
languages. It implies the usefulness of foreign language study with regard to culture.
Moreover, she said that foundational English knowledge (i.e. grammar and lexicon) shall
build English proficiency and subsequently, communicative skills would appear in due
course. Ultimately, she agreed with the other student (6) about the importance of teaching
Standard English at school whereas students learn communicative skills outside classroom.
She worries about miscommunication derived from incorrect use of English grammar and
pronunciation. Consequently, this student is different from the students (3, 4, 5) in that, she
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considers, the deeper linguistic knowledge, the easier to use English. Adapting a relatively
different approach from the previous student, she emphasized school‟s role to provide
accuracy in linguistic knowledge during compulsory education.
The other student (9) expected to learn SE for practical reasons:
I support learning American or Standard English even though it is unrealistic to
reach to the native-like English. However, we start from SE, we can progress
toward that goal (i.e. Standard English). If a student wanted to use LF, they can use
LF as needed. Nevertheless, I think, learning SE is good at school.
アメリカ英語か標準英語でいいと思います。それをやったところで、完璧にはできないので。それ (SE) をやった
ら、そこから日本人も尐し英語を覚えていくと思います。
。。それ(LF) をやったところで、自分が行くというなら、
そのようなものを使えばいいと思いますが、学校教育だったら標準英語で良いと思います。(Mr. Ka)
This acoustic engineering student (9) considers that mastering Standard English is not a
realistic goal at school. However, he supported the view of the previous student (8) to teach
SE at school as the base of English knowledge. He added that the structures of LF is
changeable and it is hard to establish a consistent learning experience on the base of LF.
Subsequently he settled on leaving LF learning to the individual, while maintaining the
importance of learning SE as an ideal at school.
The next interviewee is an English teachers and PhD student (10);
I would like to learn Standard English (i.e. British English or American English). I
think David Crystal denied this in “English as a global language”, nevertheless, I
think that, if I learn English from non-native teachers, take Singlish as an example,
which is different from Standard English, English keeps changing and by the end,
learners have no way to check its validity. Therefore, instead of learning a changing
form, it is better to learn codified English.
私個人としては、イギリスかアメリカの英語を習いたいと思うので、というのは、たしか David Crystal はそうで
ないと English as a global language で否定しいたと思うんですけど、わたしがいつも思うのは、Native でない人に教
わった英語というのは、例えば Singlish の英語を教わったら、Singlish は British English とはちがうので。英語が
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どんどん流れていってしまって最後はわけ側ならなくなると思うので、どうもそうは思えない。だとしたら、ど
んどん離れていくより、やはり中心になるものを習ったほうがいいと思います。(Mr. Se)
He (10) is teaching English at high school and, early on, he said that he has a hard time to
motivate students to study English. In the theory of David Crystal of global English, he
criticized that LF shifts its focus from building coherent knowledge to quick fix, i.e. he is
looking for an immediate solution. Then, he agreed with the previous students (8, 9) to
focus on accurate meaning and form by teaching SE in instruction. He implied that the
students have to focus on appropriate contexts and materials to assimilate into social needs.
Likewise, an engineering student (11) talked about objectives of EFL at school;
What is lingua franca? I do not think it is necessary to set a goal to native-norm of
phonic skills, but it is desirable to learn Standard English at school such as
American English or British English. Let me see, instead of learning new English changing forms, it is better to learn formal (i.e. codified) English.
LF はなんですか。別に発音とかに関しては完璧を目指す必要がないと思いますが、習う英語のスタイルとしては、
アメリカなりイギリスの正当な英語を習うほうがいいと感じています。そうですね。最新を追うよりは、多尐古
めでも、なんというか。Formal な英語を並んだ方がいいと思います。(Ms. Su)
The student (11) agreed with the student (8, 9, 10) in that learning LF would be too early
before learners make use of Standard English and as a result, level of English proficiency
could go backwards. He showed that an important goal of English at Japanese school is to
build around the teaching of four skills and its subcomponent (e.g. phoneme). It means that
the student (9, 10, 11)‟s goal of English is clearer to focus on EFL at school. In short, these
students who support SE at school pointed out that, although LF is beneficial outside
classroom, the value of SE would meet the diverse demands for academic and social needs.
Hereafter, the results extracted from the interviews will be summarized below.
Summary
This section asked the students‟ views on their goal of learning English as a LF or SE. The
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result indicated that most students wished to learn Standard English. The students were in
no doubt about the need for a tool of global communication.
According to the students, advantages of learning SE are; 1) its compatibility in writing, 2)
suited for assessments, 3) its authority, and 4) its agility and speed of the response to offer
needs (i.e. IT). However, the student said that, learning syntactic and lexical rules of
English give insurmountable difficulties, which de-motivate some learners.
The students said that an advantage of LF is in its flexible use of grammar rules and lexical
items which overtook the results to support SE. On the contrary, a weakness of LF is that it
may create misunderstanding because of its flexibility (i.e. language errors)
In sum, this study showed that boosting LF at school might be a good idea in theory, but
hard to achieve in practice. Facing needs of communicative skills at school, the student
suggested introducing LF as a part of teaching materials while teaching SE. In subsequent
section, the data analysis proceeds to the students‟ views on using the direct method.
1 - e) The use of the Direct Method
Schools need to make decisions on the medium of instruction, teaching material, and
education goals. Economic and political forces often influence these goals. To this end, this
section explores students‟ views on the medium of instruction. The basic premise of the
direct method is that L2 learning is similar to L1 acquisition (Brown, 1987:57). This
section aims to explore how the next generation in Japan views this pedagogical choice.
The results reveal that five students supported the method and one student did not, while
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seven students had neutral or uncertain opinions. In the whole group, there were five
participants who experienced the method, two were students at primary school n, one at
high school, and the remaining two at universities and one is uncertain while the rest of the
four students support the method. This section begins with the views of students who had
neutral or uncertain views:
The first student (1) said the following.
The success of the direct method depends on the individual. It is difficult to
measure its applicability. The grammatical knowledge is important for non-native
learners in Japan, while the direct method works for ESL learners. Here in Japan,
the grammatical approach might be more practical and suitable.
それも人によります。一般的にどちらがいいとはいえません。Non-native speakers とってはグラマーが必要ですが、
その人が英語を使う環境にいるならなるべく直接話した方がいいと思います。でもあまり忙しい人は文法でやっ
た方が能率的だと思います。(Mr. Ku)
This female engineering student (1) contrasted the direct method with learning grammar
and said that grammatical knowledge is necessary to speak English. She suggested that the
importance of the method depends on the individual learners‟ background. In another part
of the interview, she noted that students‟ university exams rarely require them to compose
in English.受験生なんてまったく書きませんから。論分などを書いたりしている分には出来ると思います。It means
that „Jyuken Eigo‟ (English for entrance examination) examines constitutive knowledge but
does not require them to express ideas in English. In a similar vein, the engineering student
(2) said the following:
I think that the usefulness of the direct method depends on availability of time. The
method might not work if there is a lack of time. I prefer teachers to make error
corrections on the spot, because it is not easy to fix them later. (Mr. Ka)
どれだけ時間をかけられるかということだとも思いますが、出来るならやった方がいいかもしれません。あまり
時間数が尐ないと無駄な時間が多いので、あまり役に立たないと思います。そうですね。ま、個人的な好みをし
てはその場でやって欲しいです。
(エラーコレクション)個人的は、先に持ち越されると直すのが大変なので。
He (2) said that the direct method might take longer to develop language skills. By this, he
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seems to think that the direct method is similar to L1 acquisition in that the development of
communicative skills requires English exposure inside and outside school. He added that in
English only class teachers tend to ignore students‟ language errors, thereby leaving
language errors to be diagnosed by the students themselves. He is ambivalent about the use
of the Direct Method.
The next student (3) is uncertain.
Let me see, I think a flexible use of the direct method and the grammar-translation
approach is best. The applicability of the method depends on the students‟ goals.
However, Japanese students focus on grammatical competence in order to prepare
for university examinations. In return, grammatical knowledge might improve
communicative competence. Accurate pronunciation may not be so important for
oral skills. However, it may be in the Japanese culture to value Standard English.
Although non-native speakers from other countries value fluent oral skills,
Japanese people prefer accurate English. I think it is more legitimate to study
grammar rather than memorizing situational dialogues because grammar
knowledge will provide a logical understanding of English and that student will be
able to contextualize knowledge into different dialogic situations.
うーん、両方必要なのかなと思っていて、その Situation によってどう使い分けて、Grammar???結局受験英語
でグラマーが必要なので個人的に、グラマーが必要なのかなと思っていて、あとグラマーがあることで自信をも
って話せることがあるなら Grammar が大事だと思うのですけどー。うーん、いやー。文法とは発音がいいとか話
す部分ではあまり意識されないけど、ある程度、日本人全体の印象として、正しい英語を話さなくてはいけない
のではないかという意識があって。他の国であまり重要視されていなくても、日本の気質として必要ならグラマ
ーとして必要かなと思いますし。Dialogue を覚えていたほうが、なぜこういうことをいうのかとか、文法的な理論
が判っていた方が納得しやすいのかと。単にこういうときはこういうだけだと、他のときに忚用が利かないと思
うので、そういう意味で文法が必要と思われます。(Ms. Hi)
Firstly, the student (3) agreed with the student (1) in that the grammatical structure remains
the backbone of learning. Then, she agreed with Munby (1978 in Carole and Swain
1980:5) who said, “There are rules of grammar that would be useless without rules of
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language use.” In her view, valuing „correctness‟ is part of the Japanese culture. Globally,
as the students said in question (b), non-native speakers from other countries do not see
grammatical knowledge as prerequisite to their sense of communicative competence. She
implied that language errors could be stigmatized as a marker of education level in Japan,
meaning that grammatical competence enhances communicative competence in Japan.
The next student (4) spoke as follows:
I understand that the activities in the direct method include presentation or group
work by using English. I think that group work or a presentation in the direct
method would create gaps between fast and slow learners because the students‟
level of participation varies a great deal. For example, extroverts and fast learners
progress a lot by using English while slow learners sit back and keep silent. Then,
in fact, it is good to introduce the direct method once in a while because a lesson to
use English in class is enjoyable. However, it is not desirable to focus on the direct
method. In fact, it is desirable to use English knowledge learned from syntactics
and reading classes. Essentially, adequate use of the method would raise students‟
motivation to use English.
Direct method というとグループで作業したりとかそういうことですね。やっぱりグループで勉強しようとか発表
したりすると、出来る人と出来ない人の差が多く出てしまうのですね。英語が得意な子や積極的な子に、あのー
どんどん使ってレベルアップしていけると思いますが、一方、英語の苦手意識を持っていることかちょっと積極
性がない子は、あのー、ただ座っているだけという無駄な時間になってしまうのですね。なので、ま。そういう
時間ももちろん面白いし、たまには取り入れた方が思いますけど、それを英語教育の中心におくのはあまり良く
ないのではないかなー思います。あくまでそういう授業は、なんというか、普段の文法とか Reading で学んだ英語
を、あの、まーたまには使ってみないと面白くないし、Motivation にもならないので、そういう授業は時々おくこ
とで生徒の Motivation Up に使ってみるにはいいと思います。(Ms. Za)
Although this student (4) was similar to the student (2) in that she is aware of the
usefulness of the direct method, in her view, English-only class might not be equally
effective for all students because of individual differences in personality. She said that
occasional use of the direct method might improve students‟ motivation. Thus, she agreed
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with the student (2) in recommending a mix of the grammatical approach and the direct
method.
The bilingual student (5) learned by the direct method and said the following
When I was at the UK school, I did not use a dictionary and did not translate words.
Nevertheless, I had a Japanese- English dictionary with me, but did not use it at
school. The direct method may not be so effective for beginners who do not have
writing or reading skills. In addition, language learning requires high motivation.
僕はイギリスの現地校でならったので翻訳とか一切なかったのです。ただ和英辞書は常に持っていました。辞書
は持っていて、持ってたんですけど、授業の中では英語だけだったのです。日本の読み書きが出来ない段階で使
ってやったらあまり意味がないかもしれないですね。何らかの動機がないと語学はなかなか上達しないと思いま
す。 (Mr. Ta)
He considered that the direct method might not create measurable gains for students
without sufficient reading and writing skills. In addition, he said that language learning
requires higher motivation. This returnee stressed the importance of motivation in language
learning throughout the interview. In his view, the effectiveness of the direct method also
depends on the age of the learner.
Later, he (5) described an English class that used the direct method:
I attended an English course by NETs at the university, and recognized that most
Japanese students do not want to speak English in class. They answer teachers‟
questions in a word or two. It means that they can understand discourses but they
do not know how to answer in full sentences. Returnee students can construct full
sentences and respond in full sentences.
大学でも英語を使った授業がありますが、大半の生徒は積極的に英語を話そうとしません。 しかし先生の直接的
な質問に対しては、一言二言英語の単語を返します。つまり相手が何を言っているかはわかるが、どううまく答
えを返すかがわからないといった感じです。一方、帰国子女や留学生はまとまりある文としての返事を返すこと
ができます。(Ms. Ta)
This was his first time to study English as a compulsory subject. He suggested the
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importance of answering in full sentences in class. In his view, students‟ language anxieties
may hinder students in English only class. While analyzing the data, the author was not
clear about his opinion. Then, the author emailed the student about his opinion about the
direct method and he wrote:
I began to think that the direct method is more effective after learners of a certain age
with basic literal and contextual knowledge. I am taking a math class taught by NETs
once a week at the university. English is a compulsory subject for all the students in
the math department. The students prepare well for the English class. As I mentioned
earlier, the language study requires motivation and it would be difficult to utilize the
direct method at public school in Japan.
ダイレクトメソッドは、ある年齢に達し専門知識を身につけてからの方が効果的だと思うようになってきました。
今の大学では、週に一度、Native の先生による英語のみを使う必修の科学の course があるのですが、将来理系に進
む人は英語が必須となるため生徒もこれを一生懸命勉強します。先の問いにもあったように何らかの動機がないと
語学はなかなか上達しないと思います。だから、日本の普通の公立学校でダイレクトメッソドを取り入れても生徒
はなぜやるのか分からないため効果が尐ないでしょう。 (Mr. Ta)
He said that the direct method is more effective for the students with higher motivation.
The subsequent section looks for the students in agreement. The first student (6) spoke as
follows;
Definitely, it is a good idea. However, it may not be so feasible in Japan because of
a lack of competent English teachers for English-only class. I still think it is not
necessary to study all skills at school. I also think that also the direct method
requires textbooks. Let me see, I still think that grammar knowledge should not be
a priority at school. (Mr. Ha)
ああー、いいと思います。やはり、人材が足りないじゃないですか。小学校からやろうと思うと。どうしても。
英語教師をトレーニングしたところで、日本中の学校に配置しようと思ったら、全体のレベルが、それが成り立
つレベルかどうか難しいところだと思います。総合的なことは授業でやる必要がないと思います。なにかしら、
マニュアルを作らないと。うーん。やっぱり文法的なことはそんなに授業でやる必要がないのではないかと。
This engineering student (6) does support the method but points to a lack of competent
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teachers. He pointed out that the efficacy of the direct method depends on students‟
proficiency and teacher training. Secondly, he suggests that textbooks might help students.
Nevertheless, this student supported the communicative approach at school.
The next student (7) spoke differently:
I attended an integrated junior and senior high school and the goal was to send
students to prime universities. Then the school differentiated the teaching methods.
For instance, NETs taught writing skills by the direct method, which is a
prerequisite for university exams. While students practiced writing, NNETs stayed
in the back of the classroom to help students upon request and they rarely spoke in
the class. In contrast, NNETs taught reading skills by the grammar translation
method in Japanese. I suggest utilizing both the direct method and the grammar
translation in the Japanese curriculum.
それも Direct method の授業もあるべきだと思うんですけど、すみわけと言うか、例えば高校の時は受験校に行っ
たのですけど。Native の先生がいらっしゃる時は日本人の先生は前に立たないで後ろでわからない生徒にアドバイ
スするくらいでほとんどなにも言わないです。Native の先生がほとんど自分で授業をなさっていて、基本的には
Writing.あのー。大学入試と関係させながら Native の先生でも出来ること、例えば自由英作文の書き方、レポート
の書き方みたいなことを、実際に先生が説明して、実勢に生徒に書かせるみたいなことをして、先生とのやり取
りは Native の先生がやる感じだったのですけど、それとはまた別に Reading の授業は日本人の先生が日本語を使
いながらやっていたのです。複数あるこまの内、全部が Direct とか、全部が訳読ではなくて、うまく時間として
割り振りできれば共存できると思います。 (Mr. Se)
This English teacher and PhD student (7) agreed with the student (3) that mixing
monolingual and bilingual instruction are equally important at school. At Juku, he had a
successful run of the direct method to prepare to apply for universities. Then, he suggested
the need of explicit instruction and feedback for productive and receptive language skills.
Therefore, he recommends flexibility in instruction.
Likewise, a female student (8) said;
Prior to matriculation to university, I only had a speech contest by the direct
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method. After entering the university, I took discussion and presentation courses by
NETs. From this, I thought the direct method is effective. However, I found that it
is rather difficult to understand English spoken by Japanese, notably due to
irregular uses of pauses. Additionally, I thought that reticence of Japanese students
is rather problematic. I think it is good to introduce the direct method at an earlier
stage. However, the direct method is difficult without NETs. When I was at high
school, I attended a Juku, where NETs had ten students for ninety minutes. Students
prepared well in advance and were active in discussions and I learned a lot from
other students who use English naturally.
自分の経験としてはダイレクトメソッドを使う場としてはスピーチコンテストがあるくらいでしたが、それに出
た事がありました。いいことだとは思いましたが、そこで問題に感じたことは、日本人の英語はわからないので
すよね。例えば日本人の英語は変なところできってしまったりしてどういう意味か判らないことがありました。
それからみんなで例えば、皆恥ずかしがるところがあるんですね。そういう意味で the direct method というのを早
い段階から取り入れていくと効果ではないかと思います。あとグループの中に Native がいてくれないとチョッと
厳しいかなと思います。それは、高校の時に通っていた塾、それは通っていた予備校のチョッと珍しい塾で、あ
の、Native の先生の元で Discussion を皆でするという授業で、話したいと思って勉強していきますし、だから、
自分で自主的に単語や表現を覚えたりですで、そこで伸びたと思うのは、なかで自然な表現を知っている人がい
ることが大きいと思います。(Ms.Ho)
Firstly, she said that English spoken by Japanese was not so clear because of a lack of
authentic use of English (e.g. non-standard use). Secondly, she pointed out that Japanese
students‟ shyness interferes with natural speech. Then, she disagreed with the student (5)
that the direct method is effective for students at young age. Fourthly, she said that NETs‟
presence is essential in English only class. It implies that students need the native norm of
English (i.e. accuracy) in class. Looking back, she said that the students in the direct class
were motivated and prepare well for the class. It implies that the method is promising for
highly motivated students and unsuitable for unmotivated students.
Another student (9) agreed that his English improved in the English only class:
I am not sure if the direct method is suitable in Japanese class, but I acknowledge
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that my English improved in monolingual class at the university and I gained
confidence in speaking. When I did not understand the meaning well, I used
dictionaries afterwards. Therefore, I support the method.
Best かどうか判りませんが、ある程度効果があると思います。なぜそういうかというと、大学の時にすべて英語
でやるクラスがあったのですね。それで随分力がついたんですね、だから、それでもかなり力がついたので、い
いと思います。日本語は、ないです。ではわからないままにあとで自分で調べたりとです。(Mr. Sa)
This student (9) is an English teacher and has successful achievement in TOEIC and
TOEFL tests without experience of studying abroad. From his experience, he said that the
direct method leads to confidence in using English. Those students (8, 9) who gained
competence in linguistic knowledge are more positive about implementing the direct
method in that they can learn from other students in class. In regard to error correction, this
student diagnosed errors and corrects them by himself. These students (8, 9) did not
experience anxiety in English only classes.
Hereafter, the data analysis looks at the students who disagreed with the method. The
student (10) expressed his views as follows:
In reality, Japanese students focus on writing and reading skills for the university
exams. Then, it is after matriculation that the students begin using oral skills. Then,
once Japanese students face communicative situations, I think, they would be able
to manage conversations using knowledge that we learned for the university
entrance exam. I am not sure if the method is suitable for students in puberty. It is
rather embarrassing to speak English between friends. I had similar opportunities to
speak English in class, but I did not try it.
その今の現状、高校、大学受験位まででも、ひたすら詰め込んで、詰め込んで、まー、そこから実用的なのって、
おそらく大学になってからのような気がするんですよ、僕は。そのー。使えるような環境に行ったりとかして、
いままでのをほり起こしてみて、使って、でも、それでも受験で詰め込んだ下地が出来ているので、会話くらい
なんとかなるんですよ。日本人の気質にあうかどうかというと、恥ずかしがったりとかして、そういう時間が設
けられたとか、学校の中でもそういった時間は作られていたと思いますけど、恥ずかしがったり溶かして、はは、
思春期なので、一生懸命隣のこと英語で話しなさいなんて、“かっこわるいぜー。”見ないな感じで、まー、そうい
った時間があったけど、話さなかった。実用的に使っていくことがしんきに生徒にあうかどうか、僕はそこに疑
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問点を感じます。まー、でも、使っていくべきかどうかは、ちょっと判らないけど、今思うと、僕はー (Mr. Na)
This student (10) attended a private school and said similarly to the student (1) that
Japanese school prioritize grammatical knowledge before studying at university.
His
views are similar to the student (3), that grammatical knowledge is compatible with
communicative competence. Next similarly to students (5, 8), he raised the issue of anxiety
about oral skills, which might hamper the efficacy of the direct method. He revealed that
the efficacy of the method depends on the age, which may suggest that the direct method is
better for elementary school and in higher education. He is the only student who did not
agree with the implementation of the direct method in Japanese schools.
Summary
The demand for communicative skills is rising in Japan. This section considered the
implications for the direct method in Japanese school and the result are mixed which might
mean that an implementation of the method is not readily available. Hereafter we
summarize what the students‟ views are:
Firstly, according to the students, advantages of the direct method were 1) increasing
exposure to colloquial English, 2) flexible use of teaching materials, 3) NETs‟ feedback
and role models, 4) increased motivation in speaking.
Secondly, the disadvantages of the direct method includes:
1) shortage of teaching hours,
2) difficulty of error corrections, 3) lack of competent teacher, 4) lack of students‟ English
proficiency, 5) students‟ reticence, 6) apprehension in speaking in class, and lastly, 7)
unfairness arising from differences in students‟ English proficiency and personality. In
short, these problems of the direct method are not easily controlled by teachers in class.
Implications for EFL classes in this study are: 1) as the students (3, 6) said that, after
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acquiring basic knowledge of English, mixing the direct methods with grammar instruction
is effective to improve students‟ motivation: 2) the students (8, 10) suggested applying the
method earlier age (e.g. in primary school) and in higher education, where students have
less anxiety and reticence in using English. Lastly, the student asserts that NETs‟ presence
is indispensable in conjunction with communicative interaction. In sum, the suitability of
the direct method depends on learners‟ age, levels of English proficiency, and motivation.
In the following section, I asked the student views of learning goal of English study.
1 - f) “The goal of EFL is the native speakers‟ norm” and the
question of grammatical versus communicative language
learning
Several varieties of English have arisen owing to the global spread of English.
Consequently, the traditional view of teaching the native norm of English is being
challenged. Educators have failed to offer concrete advice on the use of methods that are
specific to the various norms. This expands on the issues that we have seen in the previous
question, where success in learning involves not only the role of a language, but also the
consideration of personal factors of learners such as motivation, age, and language
proficiency.
This section examines how the students see their EFL goal in face of various norms of
English in its specific cultural context. Noteworthy is that the schooling may need to
respond to these needs (Richards, 2001:51-55). During one interview, a student said, “Our
goal of English study has long been to communicate with native speakers.” In hindsight, I
suspected from the findings of the previous section that an EFL goal of LF might have put
students at odd with SE, which is prerequisite when applying for universities. Then, I
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extended her questions to ask specifically about their preference for grammatical or
communicative approaches in the lessons.
The aim of this section is to ask whether the students‟ goal is a native-norm of English in
conjunction with a pedagogical preference of the communicative approach or the
grammatical approach. The „native norm of English‟ in this study refers to English spoken
by L1 speakers of English in the U.K. or in the U.S.A. The result showed that four students
agreed with the proposition that their learning goal should be that of native speakers, while
four students disagreed, four students had a neutral stand, and two students‟ answer was
unclear. This section opens with the students‟ neutral or uncertain opinions.
The first student (1) said:
It depends on the individual goal whether to study for native norm English or not.
それは、各々の、目的は違っていいと思います。(Mr. Su)
This acoustic engineering student (1) attended a public school outside Tokyo. Although his
opinion was neutral in respect of the proposition, his opinion and his own situation appear
to be that of most English learners‟ in Japan who do not intend to go abroad to study
English.
In contrast to the previous student, the next student (2) had returned to Japan from the USA
one month before the interview. Although this next quote appears to disagree with the goal
of the native-speaker norm, I interpreted his position as neutral:
Let me see, when I was at language school in UCLA, I spoke English with
grammar errors (e.g. “I will met”), but people still understood me. Then, I gradually
began to think that a language is a tool of communication and that it is more
important to communicate with people than trying to use English with correct
grammar. Therefore, I thought that non-native English – even called „Japanish‟
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would be acceptable for a communicative purpose.
そうですね。これもやはり UCLA の経験からすると、やはりいちいち英語でなくても、やっぱり communication
がとれていて、やっぱり言葉の、最大の目的は、その Communication のツール、それが最大の目的だと思います
ので、まー、お互いが分かり合えれば、多尐、わかっていなくても。実際僕も„I will met‟とかそんなめちゃくちゃ
なことを言ってしまったのですけどそれでも通じましたし。あのー、そういった意味ではそこまできっちりとし
た英語でなくても100パーセント理解しなくても、最低限コミュニケーションが出来る段階まで、むちゃくち
ゃでも、まー,Japanish であろうとなんであろうと、伝われば問題ないと思います。(Mr, Ot)
This economics major student (2) attended elite junior and senior schools to prepare for the
university. He sat numerous achievement tests and obtained the highest mark in the TOEIC
test. Before summer 2010, he had a job offer from a trading company. Naturally, he placed
importance of English study (henceforth ES) on oral skills and attended an English course
at UCLA in summer. There he found that, compared to Japanese students, European
students were more successful in communicative skills despite their occasional use of
ungrammatical English. He said that, since they have no planning time for interactive
situations, speakers could rely less on linguistic knowledge learned at school. Following
this answer, I asked if he wanted to break away from the grammar approach at school:
My English skills improved a lot between the first and second year at high school
in the standardized preliminary examinations for university. When I was a freshman,
I had only 60 points in our scale. In the following year, the score went up to 80
points. At that time, I felt that my reading skills improved a lot in preparing for
university entrance exams. At UCLA, I experienced relatively higher grammatical
competence of Japanese students than that of students from other countries. In fact,
I thought that Japanese students‟ level of grammatical skills was the best in the
class in UCLA. Paradoxically, I saw many European students communicating well
in ungrammatical English. Then, I began to think that it might be acceptable to
speak ungrammatical English.
やっぱり受験勉強で文法に関してすごく磨き上げられたなということをすごく感じます。伸びたというのは高校
二年生ぐらいで、あのー、伸びたと思ったとき。なぜ伸びたかというと高校に入ってからセンター試験を受けて
いたのですが、高校一年生の時はあまり取れなくて、多分六割かその位だったと思いますけど、高校二年生で受
けたら、もう、八割かそのくらいになっていて、まー、その瞬間にやはり読解力という意味でははやり伸びたの
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かなということを実感しました。UCLA へ行っていても、やはり、文法に関して日本人が一番出来ているという
すごく感じました。やっぱり、かといって文法が出来なくても、やっぱり、ヨーロッパ人というのはぺらぺらし
ゃべっていて、だから、そのー、communication という意味では、もうちょっと文法がめちゃめちゃでも大丈夫な
のかなーというのをすごい、感じました。あ、文法に関してですか。正直に申しますと、文法に関しては、日本
人に対して絶対負けてないなと思いましたけど、Speaking に関しては負けているなと思いました。(Ms. Ot)
In language learning, he showed his emancipation from the grammatical approach.
Likewise, the female student (3) who went to Australia commented.
I forgot to tell you earlier, but I had another opportunity to use English. In the
summer of my junior year, I studied English in a language school in Australia for
three weeks. It is commonly known that European students have strong opinions
and participate in active debates in English with strong accents while most Asian
students were reserved in class. I confirmed this image in the Australian language
school. Then, I realized that native-norm phonic skills are not a prerequisite for
English communication. From this, I felt that native-like pronunciation is not
required in English communication worldwide. From this, I began to think that
accurate pronunciation might not be a priority of EFL at Elementary School. In fact,
it is more important to catch up with the natural conversation. Therefore, I
recommend practicing speed dialogue and colloquial English exchanges at school.
さっき言い忘れてしまったのですけど、大学に入ってから英語にふれる機会がもうひとつあって、大学の二年の
夏に、オーストラリアの語学学校に三週間行っているですね。一般的に言われていることだと思うのですけど、
ヨーロッパとかの人は主張が強くて、Debate して、発音が悪くてもよく主張するんですけど、アジア人の人はあ
まり主張をしないという一般的イメージがあって、実際そうだと思いました。
そこで、発音がちょっとなまっ
ていても通じればいいのかと、それが世の中、世界全体をとられた時の英語なのかなと、私は思いました。発音
絶対というのは小学校英語教育の最上課題でもないのかなと。結局、speed Dialogue だったり、フレーズのやり取
りだったりするのがいいのかなーと思います。(Ms.Hi)
This student (3) studied pharmacology and agreed with the preceding student (2) that the
goal of native-like norm of English by the grammar approach does not produce
communicative skills. She put the emphasis on pronunciation as the main element in the
idea of native-speaker norm, even though there are other aspects of this norm (e.g. use of
idioms) and recommended increasing dialogical practices instead of practicing isolated
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words. As in the previous section (b, c), she appears to always worry about pronunciation.
Her story after her visit to Australia continued as follows.
Then, I took an optional debate course at the university. After five lessons, I
withdrew from the course because I lacked opinions to participate in discussions.
Furthermore, the course was not compulsory, and I became busier with my science
study.
Option で受けられる授業で、大学二年の後半に、えーと、Discussion か、Debate とかの授業を NE の先生で、それ
は結局まー、それは必修科目ではなかったので、最後まで出ないで、5 回ぐらい出て Drop Out してしまいました。
科目が多かった事もありますし、自分の中で足りないスキルが Discussion skill だと思っていっていたのですけど、
でも実際受けて持て、そのー。英語自体のスキルより Discussion 自体のスキルの方が大切だと思って、結局意見が
ないと Discussion 出来ないということもあって、それでまー、行けなくなってしまったということもあります。
(Ms. Hi)
This student (3) dropped out of a course, which would have allowed her to join discussions,
showing that in addition to language skills, the ability for communication is embedded in
wider competencies, which are not a matter of what is learnt in class. Her experience
agreed with the previous speaker (2) that lack of oral skills (i.e. the ability to express
opinions) among Japanese students might be a cultural matter. The corollary is that
successful communicative skills require not only knowledge of language but also life
experience for intercultural communication.
The next student (4) talked about the whole language learning:
It is difficult to choose one out of two. There are two reasons for that. The priority
depends on the learners‟ goals. Firstly, students in engineering and in humanity
studies need different English curricula. Secondly, in online communication, we
simultaneously use listening and writing skills. Thus, grammatical skills and
communicative skills are linked and it is difficult to have only receptive skills.
それはひとつに絞るのは難しいです。理由はふたつあります。目的によって違います。例えば工学の勉強してい
る人とそうでない人が同じプログラムではいいわけではありません。あと、お互いに関係しやっているので、例
えば Chat をしている時に、聞きながら書くわけですが、お互いが関係しているわけでどれかひとつの能力を伸ば
すのは難しいと思います。(Ms. Ku)
The engineering student (4) agreed with the student (1) that learners‟ needs vary greatly.
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Secondly, she pointed out that all skills are needed in communicative situations.
The aforementioned students were neutral, uncertain or gave only generalized answers.
Hereafter, we will analyze the data from the students who supported learning native-norm
of English. A student (5) describes a debate course at Juku:
Yes, the native speakers‟ English has been my goal in ES for a long time.
Recounting my experience in senior high school days, I attended debate courses by
a NET at Juku. The students discussed a variety of topics e.g. the jury system or the
death penalty. Afterwards, we had a writing assignment of 200 words and we
received NETs‟ feedback. I enjoyed the lessons a lot because the students freely
expressed their opinions. After matriculation to University, I do not have any
similar debate experience, speaking is rarely demanded, and the barrier for
speaking has risen.
そうですね。ずっとそれを想定して勉強してきた様に思います。高一、高二、高校三年生ぐらいまでですか、毎
週、NET の先生と三時間、塾でなんですけど、例えば、えとー、死刑は廃止されるべきかどうかと、Jury System
についてどう思うかとか、そういう多岐にわたるテーマについてみんな Discussion すろとか、あと自分でも、確
か200文字ぐらいの Writing Report を書いて、チェックしてもらって、また書き直すと言うことをやっていた時
は、やはりみんなで考えましたし、しゃべりたかったから、そのころは抵抗なくしゃべっていましたし、良かっ
たですね。ただそういうことがなくなって、大学に入ってしまってからは、ハードルが高くなってしまいました
ね、話すことに。(Ms.Ho)
This student (5) pointed out that Japanese students have to create opportunities to use
English outside classroom. Notwithstanding, she is different from other students (2, 3) in
that she enjoyed expressing her opinions freely in English at Juku. It suggests that the
feasibility of ES activities depend on learners‟ personality. It would also mean that it is
easier to speak English in a small class without assessments at school. Lastly and
noteworthy, this student said that peers‟ feedback and teachers‟ guidance are beneficial.
The bilingual student (6) spoke about the definition of native-ness.
Defining native-English is rather problematic. I do not think that English spoken by
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native speakers is always correct. I always feel that native speakers understand my
English even though it is not perfect. On the other hand, in the case of verbal
interaction between non-native speakers, it is often difficult to understand each
other. Let me see, from the beginning of this interview, I wanted to say that I hope
to speak English, which is different from the English we learned at school. For
example, I want to express my opinions persuasively and convey my feelings in
discourses appropriately. There must be oral skills that we might learn outside
classroom.
うーん、正しい英語がそもそもあるのかというところに問題がありますよね。Native Speaker がしゃべっている英
語が正しい英語かというと、本当はそうじゃないと思います。やっぱり、Native Speaker の人としゃべる目的でや
ると、でも Native Speaker はこちらがあまり上手ではない英語でしゃべっても理解してくれると思うのですが、う
ーん、やはり英語があまりできない人同士がしゃべったら意思の疎通が難しい時が多いと思います。僕はむしろ、
学校の勉強ではなくて、なんかこう、会話、うまい会話ができる英語ができればよかったなーって最初にいいた
かったのですけど、たとえが学校の英語ではなくて、人を説得する英語だとか、上手く感情を伝える英語だとか、
学校ではあまり教えてくれない英語というのがあると思うのですよ。(Mr. Ta)
This returnee (7) moved to the U.K. at the age of seven and attended British school. He
studied with native speakers of English from a variety of family backgrounds and
ethnicities. First, he said that native speakers English and Standard English are not
necessarily isomorphic. Then, he agreed with the student (2) in that native speakers
understand non-native speakers‟ English better than non-native English speakers. It implies
that he is more comfortable using English with native speakers. Thus, he supported the
goal of the native-norm of English. With the privilege of bilingual speakers, he wishes to
acquire native-like fluency including communication with humour.
In contrast to these students, the following students disagreed with teaching native-norm of
English. The student (8) said:
I do not think so. It is difficult to define native-norm of pronunciation. At my
school, non-native speakers enter frequently, and we were used to communicating
with these students without English fluency. I do not have any uncomfortable
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memories of this. There are many non-native English speakers around the world
whose have good communication skills in English.
そんな風に思わないです。そもそも正しい発音はなんだということになりますが。スタンダードな英語が自分の
母国でない人が多いと思うんです。Non-native 同士が話をするので、また新しいできない子が入ってきたという感
じでそういったこと Communicate するのに何の躊躇もないです。私もそこまでは、悲しい思いはないです。それ
で彼らが Communication 能力がないかというとそうではないと思うんです。 (Ms. To)
This bilingual returnee (8) attended an international school from the age of seven until high
school graduation, and she disagreed. She took a positive view of the potential of
non-native norm English communication. This student is similar to the student (3) in
suggesting that native - norm of English implies native speakers‟ pronunciation. She agreed
with other students (2, 3, 5) that non-native speakers‟ L1 effect on their English does not
necessarily interfere with communication in English. Interestingly, there are differences
between the two returnees and in that student (8) studied ESL at an American school
whereas the student (7) attended the British education system with a prerequisite of fluency
in English before admission. In both cases, the major language experiences were formed at
school.
The next speaker (9) spoke as follows.
Let me see, from an equal opportunity perspective, considering that non-native
speakers of English outnumber native English speakers, I do not think my goal of
English study is to communicate with native speakers. Let me speak about Jazz,
which is relevant to language learning. Jazz players use a technique called
improvisation, which is an ad-labium method deriving new form from old ones. They
use codes and add accents to their playing. Some player can charge his playing with
his emotion. Quite a few musicians believe that improvisation technique is relevant
to language teaching. For example, some English learners are superior in
spontaneous talk, while some others are less able in this regard. This is similar to
music playing. In theory, there are two ways for music teaching: First, learners start
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from theory and then mimic others‟ players; and the other is to mimic other players‟
playing techniques one after another without knowledge of music theory. Of course,
the majority of musicians work on collaborative practice and study theory
simultaneously. I did not take any systematic trombone lessons and learned mostly
by playing.
うーん、まー、そうでないと思います。現実的に、Native のひとも国際的なところにいるので、別に Native の人と
話すだけではないと思います。音楽で今ジャズというと ad-live play が特徴ですが、ad-lib 分で適当にやるという、code
signal があって、和音が決まって極に決まっていて、その上で、その上で自分でメロディーを作っていくと。それ
って出来る人と出来ない人がいます。まー、今言語教育ですが、そのー、ジャズはアドリブというので、言語の習
得に結びつける人がたくさんいて、やっぱりべらべら話す人とそうでない人といて、アドリブもまさにそうなんで。
教育方法も、教育法も、ま、大きく二つあって、理論から攻める人と、とにかくコピーして、コピーして、攻める
人がいて、理論の人はそういうところから入る。コピーというのはひたすら、意味が判らないけど、ひたすら練習
するということです。はい、そりゃもうタイプがあって。全然理論が判らなくても引ける人もいて。センスもあり
ますが、理論を本当に積み重ねてうまくなる人もいますし、いますね。そういう人もいるし、理論がわからないけ
ど上手な人もいますね。はい、もちろん、両方やるという人もいますし、まーそういう人が一番多いです。先生に
習ったことはないです。大きな楽器ですが、昔は手が届かなかったです。(Mr. Ka)
This acoustic engineering student (9) expressed his disagreement of the principle by
focusing on his English needs outside of school. Then, he compared acquiring musical
topology to language learning and described two musical analogues of language learning,
namely 1) improvisation, i.e. a communicative approach in that learners practice English
by infusing their feelings into words, and 2) studying theory, i.e. a grammatical approach.
According to this student, most learners utilize both approaches, which he appeared to
favour. This indicates that language training may be helped by a variety of activities.
Summary
This question explored in particular whether students thought they should try to achieve
native speaker norms and the consequences for the pedagogical choice of grammar or
communication approaches. As the number of non-native speakers is increasing both in
relative and absolute terms, non-native speakers of English continue to be singled out in
their written and oral discourse. In response to the global needs of English, this section
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presented students‟ views of the goal of native speaker norms and the teaching
methodology, notably for schools in an EFL environment. The results are mixed which
may imply the students‟ changing attitudes, which may underscore a traditional learning of
a native norm of English.
The data indicated by the students in setting a native-norm of English in EFL class were:
(i) native speakers‟ superior English pronunciation, (ii) native speakers‟ abilities to
understand a variety of highly varied texts or discourse due to inter-language influence,
and more enjoyable atmosphere in class. A student (7) suggested that miscommunication
might arise in non-native speakers‟ communication. A problem for a native norm of
English that the students said is its high hurdle to achieve it.
The advantages of the communicative approach that the students mentioned were the
contextualized learning in dialogue instead of rote learning of isolated words and the
ability to pick up the natural flow of the conversation. The disadvantages of the method
were uneven speaking opportunities and the shortage of class time. The divergent and
conflicting students` views may suggest that many students are independently thinking
strategies of learning and using English. Thus, the students are flexible in the strategies
they adapt in studying English and communicating in English. It implies that they are no
longer passive learners of English.
Interestingly, one student compared learning methods with Jazz improvisation when he
spoke of building the language foundation first (i.e. the grammatical approach) versus
infusing feelings and gestures into the oral English usage (i.e. the communicative
approach).
In addition, a variety of factors contributes to undermine both approaches. For example,
Japanese students‟ academic goal of university exams making it more difficult to use
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communicative approach and cultural expectation of European students, which focus on
fluency, rather than accuracy of native-norm of English is seen as a most important
advantage for communicative approach.
There were no signs that either gender or individual socio-cultural difference distinguish
the students‟ views. It may suggest that culture as transmitted in school through L1 and L2
instruction would influence the students‟ views.
In the following section, the data analysis shall present the students‟ views on how the
global spread of English might influence national power.
1 - g) Language skills and national power
The spread of the English language around the world appears to lead to changes in cultural,
educational, and socio-political perspectives. However, the result of the English spread
remains unclear in absence of an empirical analysis in specific segments of affected
communities. Phillipson, (1992) pioneered the studies of language power and its
imperialism through economic perspectives and said that the dominant use of English
language for global communication might lead to an imbalance of power (hereafter – the
proposition). This study is not politically oriented but rather looks into whether the
worldwide diffusion of English is seen by students as a threat in the community at hand,
either in economic or in cultural or political regard. I asked students if they think that
English language skills would affect national power balances. The data shows that eight
students agreed with the proposition while four students disagreed and one returnee student
was neutral or uncertain. One student was not asked this question.
The data analysis begins with this neutral or uncertain student (1).
First, I thought that language affects national power. However, considering the
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history of the past 100 years, Japan has achieved economic success, which is next
to that of the U.S.A. and bigger than that of the U.K. or Germany, despite the
latter‟s higher English proficiency. I began, therefore, to doubt whether English
affects the national power or not. It shall depend on the direction of future
economical expansion. If the service sector (e.g. tourism and banking) becomes an
important sector in the Japanese economy, Japan needs to have an increased
number of people with English language skills.
初は僕もそう思っていたのですが、でもこの百年ぐらい、ずっとそういわれていますけど、日本は第二の経済大
国になったではないですか。イギリスより、ドイツより、アメリカは別として日本は、経済力を取ったのではな
いですか。そう考えるとー・しかし。これから将来日本がどうするかという話になると、これから日本が輸出産
業だけでやっていくのは難しいので、今度逆にサービス業とか、知的な分野、情報とか観光とは、となるとやは
り英語がもっと重要になってくるのではないかと思います。観光が日本は栄えてないので、外国人が尐ないのは、
英語が通じないという点があるのかもしれません。(Mr. Ta)
Referring to the size of the Gross Domestic Product, which is a measure of economic reach,
this student spoke about the relationship between the spread of the English language and
power from the business perspective. At first, this student (1) drew upon the history of
economic growth in the past 100 years and concluded that, in the past, the success of
Japanese economy did not rely on language skills. Then, he said that it is not possible to
know if this will be true in the future because how English language affects national power
(e.g. GDP) will depend on the direction of future business development. It implies that it is
not clear if bi/multilingual countries enjoy lasting economical advantage in global arenas
or not. He is the only student who was uncertain about this question.
Hereafter, the data analysis looks at the students in agreement with the proposition. One
student (2) spoke about the importance of tourism and international business:
In addition to travel agencies, some Japanese companies (e.g. Rakuten, Ion)
gradually adopt English as their official working language. Thus, their employees
began studying English at language school, while others take private lessons, which
are very expensive. I am also considering taking English lessons. Generally, the
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English language would affect national power. English is used as an official
language in international organizations, and the accounting system worldwide is a
good example of a European standard that has been adopted for the world
accounting standard. In this case, Japanese accountants could not fully participate
in the discussion due to their lack of English skills. They now have to follow
European standards in international business. In this way, English language skills
might affect national power. It is not necessary for all Japanese people to have skill
in English, but the present number of Japanese with English skill is not sufficient.
Therefore, it is desirable to have more Japanese who can communicate in English
in international situations.
今の観光の話もそうですしが、えー、今、例えば、どんどん、いま日本の企業、各企業も、楽天とかイオンや公
用語を英語にしているように、そうすると、やっぱり社員もあせって、Berlitz といったところですとか、まー、
人によっては家庭教師をつけていこうかと。家庭教師は値段が高いと思うので、ドンドン勉強していくと思うの
で、そういった意味では、国力に影響するのかなーと、あのー。また、国連とかそういった国際的な場所でも、
やっぱり公用語は英語ですし、それが出来ないことによって、あのー今、会計基準かもたしか、今、確か公認会
計士たちとか英語ができないので、なかなか議論に参加できなくて、どんどんどんどん、やっぱり IPASS とかも
Europe 基準なってしまったりとか。それを常に日本はあわせなくてはいけないというふうになっていっていると、
そういう意味ではやはり、英語が出来ないと国力に影響するのかなと思います。日本人全員が英語できる必要が
ないと思いますが、ただ今の実情はやはり英語が出来る日本人は尐ないのかなとー。あの、一定数ができるべき
だとすごく思ってまして、国際的に活躍しているのは大事だと思っていまして、そういった意味では全員が出来
る必要がないですけど、もうちょっとやはりふえて、もうちょっとやはり、国際的な場で Communications ができ
る人がふえていったらいいのかなと思います。(Mr Ot)
This student (2) described implications of the global spread of English from an economical
point of view and was worried that Japanese companies have become followers of
international rules in global arena due to lack of English skills. He implied that the de facto
establishment of English as a working language might threaten economical power balance
rather than cultural or military balance. In reality, a problem of economical imbalance in
global era (i.e. uneven distribution of wealth) is a fundamental operating proposition,
which appears to pose the most serious challenge in capitalized society today.
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A female student (3) stated from a historical perspective on colonialism:
Yes, language affects national power and it dates back to colonial history of the past
500 years. It is difficult to stop the spread of English around the world and it is not
good to question the situation. It does not imply that native English speakers should
not learn foreign languages. I believe it important to cultivate multiple views
through languages in our lives.
はい、国力に影響していると思いますし、過去の歴史というか、この500年の植民地時代の歴史が関係してい
ると思います。もうそれは変えられない事なので、別に英語が世界の言葉として使われている事が問いただされ
るべきではないと思います。でもだからといって native speaker が英語以外の言葉を学ばなくていいと、違うかな
っと思っていて、やはり彼らも他の言語を学ぼう、多様性を持とうという意識を持つというのは、やはり大事な
事だと思います。 (Ms Za)
This student (3) studied at Cairo University for one year to extend her Arabic studies at a
university specializing in foreign language study. In her view, the origin of the proposition
is in colonial history. She implies that language (i.e. English) does not represent a cultural
identity. Secondly, she said that language strongly influences people‟ ideas. It means that,
by transferring languages to other countries, languages transfer different cognitive ideas
(different ways of thinking). Thereby, she suggested that multilingualism benefits people in
understanding other people. In another part of interview, she (3) spoke of language
relativity:
Taking about syntax, different language has a different syntactical system. For
example, English and Arabic has „gerund‟ while Japanese language do not. Then,
when I find it difficult to translate Arabic words into Japanese, I translate Arabic
into English first. Then, I translate the word into Japanese, because English has a
more similar structure to Arabic. It means that English and Arabic share more
similar syntactic features than Japanese and Arabic. Consequently, it is easier to use
an English-Arabic dictionary to understand Arabic texts. Another reason to use
English for Arabic study is that, Arabic study has long history; the Arabic language
study is not so popular in Japan. Consequently, we use English - Arabic dictionary
143
to study Arabic at the university.
文法用語というのは、例えば形容詞とか、形容詞は日本語にありますけど、動名詞は日本語にないではないです
か、そういった日本語にない概念がもう習っているので役に立つ時があります。あとは、翻訳するときもアラビ
ア語から日本語だとちょっと概念がわからない時、一度英語に翻訳して、それからアラビア語に直すと判りやす
い時があります。例えば言葉の概念もアラビア語と日本語ですごくかけ離れていて訳すと起動してわからない時、
一度英語にするとわかりやすいじゃないですか。そのー、ある単語の概念が英語とアラビア語のほうが概念が近
いではないですか。あー、言語として近いかどうかわかりませんが、たまたま、そのー。アラビア語と英語だと
ほぼかぶっていて、日本語だと一部かぶっているけど。そういうこともあると、英語を挟むと判り易いです。あ
とーアラビア語教育がそんなに日本で広まっていないこともあって、あと、アラビア語学習が学科としては古い
のですが、そこまで刷新されていないということもあって日本であまり広がっていないので、私たちが使ってい
る辞書は英語アラビア語辞書を使うのです。( Ms Za)
The European colonization of the Arabic world has resulted in good English-Arab
dictionaries in the past, and now serves the interviewee to access the Arab language. It
could mean that the former colonial countries who adapted English as an official language
advanced multiculturalism. This student acknowledged an advantage of using the English
language in understanding other cultures. However, she said that Arabic study is not
popular in Japan.
The next student (4) spoke from a cultural perspective:
I agree that language affects national power. However, if another language such as
Chinese were a world language, the situation would be the same here in Japan.
Japanese people are not good at communicating in foreign languages. The basic
problem is a lack of communication among Japanese people, which is separate
from the issue of foreign languages. This lack of communication is already
affecting diplomatic and business sectors here.
それは思いますね。でも日本の場合は、英語が中心の社会になったので英語が盛んになっていますが、他の語学
が出てきたらましになるかというとそうでないと思います。たとえば中国語が世界に広まっても、やはり同じ結
果だと思います。なぜかというと、外国語での communication skill に欠けているからです。日本語以外の
communication skill がビジネスでも外交にも影響していると思います。(Mr. To)
This bilingual student of English and Japanese (4) studied French as a foreign language
and majored in international relations. She pointed out a lack of communicative skills in
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Japan, which is separate issue to foreign language difficulties. She claimed that this
communicative apprehension among Japanese is embedded in the culture, and it is not an
effect of English because the same would happen if it were another language, such as
Chinese.
Another student (5) spoke of the importance of English in the global market.
Let me see. Low English proficiency may diminish the opportunities to participate
in international trading markets. For example, even if a company has a competitive
product, it is not possible to sell it without English language skills. Consequently,
the market share will shrink. What shall I say, I think, many Japanese students have
a difficult time learning English, therefore they do not enjoy or like it.
英語に対しての苦手意識というのは、結局日本の海外取引も減る傾向かなっと思って、そのー、語学に対しての
苦手意識があるだけで、海外に行くというチャンスがあるのに、結局、そのー、海外に売れる商品なのにそうい
う機会があるのに使えなかったり、市場が狭くなってしまったりとか、そういった意味では、海外と商売がしに
くくなったりと。どうなんでしょうね、嫌いというより、苦労している人がいるかもしれない。(Ms. Hi)
Firstly, referring to global commodity markets operating in English, the student (5) agreed
with the students (2, 3) in that lacking language skills would damage Japanese economical
power. Secondly, she noted that problems facing Japanese students in ES are not their
motivation but rather difficulties in finding efficient ways to study English. It suggests that
the students are ambivalent about learning a new language and that the economy suffers as
a result.
The next student (6) studying international relations spoke as follows and focused on a
different aspect of power, diplomatic, as well as economic.
Yes, I agree. I think that Japanese opinions will be weakened at an international
conference. Although I have not seen it, a lack of English proficiency among
Japanese representatives would affect their diplomatic influence. With increasing
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international diplomatic occasions, this situation will be repeated and I am very
worried about the situation. I totally agree [that language proficiency affects national
power]. In the past, Japan was able to develop our country by ourselves.
Nevertheless, today, population in Japan is shrinking and our country needs to rely
on international market. Japanese people are slow to take actions. I feel that Japanese
people are slow to take actions. It is not only in language, but they are not
competitive. For example, Korean people take actions promptly not only in
international business but also other issue such as developing nuclear reactors.
I wish if there would be an increasing number of Japanese people with English skills
who deal with international affairs to hear our voices and maintain our status in
global arena. An idea has just flashed in my mind that Japanese people do not
understand what people with different cultures have in mind... It may be due to a
short of foreign residents in Japan. I think that my awareness toward realties in a
global world today has deepened at the conference. I began to think that it is good
enough to maintain economic stability rather than aiming for economic growth. After
I spoke with many people in Egypt, I recognized that world today do not wish to live
in harmony but they think of their own interests first. Then, people around the world
today prioritize their economical interest first. I was shocked to learn this reality.
Japan could be at risk when Japanese lawmakers trust the proposition of global
harmony. It is important to stand by ourselves. I learned need of awareness of risk
management at the conference. English skills could preserve national power.
はい、思います。例えば、国際会議の場などで、全然見たことはないですけど、堪能にやり返していけなければ負け
ていくではないかと、そうのが益々機会が増えていくのではないかと、本当に心配です。昔であれば Domestic に反
映してきたと思いますが、Domestic な工業生産だとか言語を解さないでできる産業で発展できたと思いますが、こ
れからは、まー、尐子化の流れがどうなるかよく判りませんが、でも、海外へ売っていく事なしでは成り立たないと
私は感じますので、そういった時には競り負けていくという事を思います。
やはり日本はのんびりしていると思います。言語だけではなくて、日本人の初動の遅さみたいなものを感じますけど、
例えば、なんか、こう、国で一体になって、流通ビジネスとか原子力とかおいている韓国に日本は競り負けてとられ
ているとかそういうこと、そういうこと、そういうニュースを見ていると、そこには語学的なもので得意でドンドン
146
出て行ける日本人が臆さず出ていければ、日本人は出て行けて日本はもっと地位、位置を守っていけるのではないか
と思います。日本人にいて外国人の人はどういうことを考えているのかをしらないということもあるのかなと。例え
ば外国人の国内の尐なさとも関係なるのかな、今思いついたことですけど。自分の国に対してですか。あ、それは良
くなったと思います。エジプトに行って外国人に対しての考えが良くなったと思います。私は、なんというか、これ
もまだはっきりした結論ではないですけど、経済成長はそんなにしなくても。例えば右肩上がりに成長していかなく
てもいいのではないかと。安定成長を保っていければそれでいいのではないかと思っていたのですけど、エジプトに
行って彼らの話を聞いていると、全然、そんな、みんなと仲良く他の国とやっていこうなんて思っていなくて、自分
の国のことを思っていて、自分の国がどう伸びてどう地位を上げていくかに興味があって、あのー。国益と言うか、
なんというか、まずわが国ありきというのをすごくみて、外国ってこういう事を考えていることが判って、ショック
を受けて、だから、みんなでのんびり仲良くやろうと思っていたら、そんなのは騙されちゃって、それでみんなで搾
取してやられてしまうからだからがんばらなきゃだめなんだということが判って、そういう意味では危機管理が上が
って、それは良かったと思います。発言力が弱まっていくと思います。(Ms. Ho)
This student (6) noted that English skills among Japanese representatives working in
international meetings are lower than those from other countries. Secondly, she highlighted
Japanese people‟ reserved attitude, which is embedded in Japanese culture. Thirdly, she
pointed out that Japanese people lack understanding of people with other cultures. Fourthly,
she learned from the international conference that people worldwide began to focus on
economical benefits rather than being cooperative toward other countries. Ultimately, she
expressed that a weaker communicative skills in English might risk national security. Then,
she added:
I think native speakers of English have advantage due to the global spread of
English, which is nearly out of control. However, the term „advantage‟ is not
synonymous with superiority. They are receiving more benefits out of the
globalization than people living in non-native speakers of English are.
彼らの立場は得な位置にあると思います。得な位置にある問いかな。Superior ではないでが。母語として英語を
持っていてそれが不可逆的な速度で Spread していって、得だという位置にあるというふうに感じます。(Ms. Ho)
She implied that benefits of globalization are unevenly distributed around the world. Then,
people in native English speaking countries may benefit more due to EIL language skills.
Overall, she appeared to suggest that there is a lack awareness to serve to other people in
global world today. Difficulties may lie in lack of communication. Then, she concluded
that language skills affect national security.
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Likewise, the next student (7) spoke from an economic perspective;
I think English skills have some affects [on national interests]. I do not know
whether it is a good thing or not, but there is [some influence]. Levels of impact
vary in each sector. For example, people working in an international environment,
for example, engineers or journalists, at least need fluent reading skills.
If Japan
lacks a population with English skills, it takes longer to operate business in global
market. Perhaps, people working for global markets already have English skills.
そうですね。それはあると思います。あると思いますし、あまり良いこととかどうかわかりませんが・そうです
ね、まー、分野によると思いますが、国際交流していく分野だと、そうですね、技術的な分野だとか、論文も英
語でかかれてますし、英語が出来る人が尐ないと時間がかかるし、でもそういう人はもう英語が出きるのかもし
れませんが. (Mr. Ka)
This engineering student (7) was somewhat hesitant at first to answer the question.
Subsequently, he agreed with the students (3, 4) descriptions of the usefulness of English in
the global market. The reason for his initial hesitation might show that the students had not
recognized the benefits of EIL. Other students who supported the proposition answered
briefly. I felt that during the interviews, the students had not considered the issue deeply
because of the obvious benefits of using English in their academic and personal domains.
Then, we look at students‟ views who disagreed with the proposition. The next student (8)
did not agree with regard to the business perspective on language power:
The benefits of EIL do not amount to a zero-sum game. The situation of non-native
speaking countries can be applied to any other non – English speaking country. If
the Japanese language became a world language, would Japan be superior in power
to the U.S.A.? Today, the U.S.A. has an advantage because their mother tongue is
used around the world, but Japan may not be inferior nor disadvantaged because of
this fact by itself.
言い回しで不利というのは、何がなければ不利じゃないかということ。他の国だったら起こりうる事とかもしれ
148
ませんが。そりゃ、日本語が世界共通語だったら日本は有利でということじゃないですか。それだけのことでは
ないでしょうか。まー、特別に日本が不利ということはないのではないですか。そりゃーアメリカが有利である
とは思いますが。(Mr. Ha)
This student does not subscribe to any mono-causal explanation of the international power
balance in terms of language. He appears to question this assumption as simplistic.
A female student (9) described diplomatic skills rather than language, which affect national
power:
I do not think that language affects national power. But, considering the Japanese
political debate, I feel the popularity of Japanese politicians is low. For instance,
Switzerland has three official languages and leaders need to speak three languages.
Many participants from France and Switzerland or other countries, even Chinese
diplomats have good political skills and leadership. Therefore, even if the English
skills are disregarded, Japanese diplomacy is still problematic because a quality of
human resources in politics here is low.
そうは余り思いません。英語限らず、日本のトップの人は、たとえば政治家などの基本的な資質が低いと思いま
す。国会議論の議論の仕方を聞いていてもがっかりしてしまうことが多いです。かなり低いと思います。例えば
スイスだったら公用語が三つもあるので、政治家だったらその三つをしゃべれないと困るわけですね。基本でき
るでしょうし、フランスでもトップのエリートの学校でも、スイスフランスに限らずどこの国でも、例えば、中
国でもトップの人たちは政治手段は上手いと思います。そう思うと日本は英語云々ではなくて、基本的資質が低
いと思います。(Ms. Ku)
This acoustic engineering PhD student (9) was critical in describing the relationship
between language and power and agreed with the student (4) in that a lack of diplomatic
skill
is a central concern in Japan when facing intercultural situations. Crucially, referring
to Japanese relatively low skills in handling international issues, she noted that it is not
language skills but more the attitudes of politicians, which threaten national interests.
Several further students expressed agreement or disagreement without adding new ideas.
This section will be summarized below.
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Summary
This section looked at the students‟ views on whether the global usage of English would
threaten Japanese national interests or not. Despite vehement debates about English around
the world, students gave different views from diverse perspectives. The result showed that
nine students agreed because of their business and culture perspective. Among them, two
students spoke from a political perspective in that Japanese people are slow to take actions
due to their language skills; one student referred to cultural inheritance of reticence or
conservativeness; and four students commented on functional criteria of English in the
global market that low English proficiency would affect national interest.
Four students disagreed with the proposition because the world language benefits global
communities and the situation is not seen as problematic. In addition, other factors e.g.
diligence contributes to national power. One student was neutral considering the post-war
development of Japanese economy, which did not rely on foreign language skills only. The
majority of the arguments advanced were in favour of benefits that the students feel result
from a world language.
In short, the students appear to worry about a shortage of physical, cultural, and
psychological connections in the world today. It may suggest that we need awareness to
reconnect each other through intercultural experience. This section closes here, and the
data analysis now moves to the next main question.
2 -h) What are their views about the perceived low level of
Japanese students‟ language skills?
150
The prevailing opinion of the media is that Japanese learners have low English proficiency
(hereafter called the „proposition‟). I thought that it is important to analyze the students‟
perceptions of these views because if they share these perceptions, then this would
de-motivate them or affect their confidence in their English study. I trust that students‟
achievement can be improved, since, as education psychologists (in Christophel and
Gorham, 1995: 293) confirm, most students are capable of making rational choices for
their goals and, if properly motivated, take action to further develop their abilities.
The results show that seven students agreed with a popular perception that Japanese
learners are inferior in learning foreign language as compared to people in other non-native
speaking countries. In contract, two students disagreed with the negative views of Japanese
learners while seven students were neutral or uncertain. This sections starts by looking at
the neutral views.
The acoustic engineering student (1) is an early starter of English study;
I wish Japanese people would be able to improve their English skills. The reliability
of the perception varies individually, but I generally perceive that the
communicative ability to carry out casual English conversation is weak among
Japanese students.
それは改善できたらいいと思います。そうですね、えーと、分野にもよると思いますが、会話とかは弱いと考え
ています。 (Mr. Su)
The reticent student (1) appeared keenly aware of growing interest in learning English and
has in fact attended English classes outside his school for 12 years since he was at
elementary school. He said that the perception of low proficiency of Japanese learners
might apply to oral skills but he did not mention other skills
The next student (2) spoke about individual experiences:
Different students have different requirements, for example reading English
journals for academic purposes, while others wish to communicate in English with
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the desire to be acquainted with people and with the culture of the target language.
Thus, the assumption is half-true and half untrue and unspecific. I have not
travelled abroad, and my English proficiency is not high, but I still do not think that
Japanese students‟ are inferior to those of other non-native speaking countries. If
we denote the students‟ skills of various countries in a line chart, the line would be
horizontal (i.e. the same). I recognized that exchange students have good
communicative skill regardless of their nationalities. There are mainly two
categories of students, i.e. high or low proficiency groups and only few students are
between these two poles. A characteristic of students with lower communicative
skills is that they are not willing to speak English. This tendency only applies to
oral skills but not to writing and reading skills nor to communicative skills in
Japanese.
それはいやですね。うーんと、それは真実である部分とそうでない部分があると思います。というのは、そのー、
例えば、大学は高等教育なので、こういうところで勉強している人は、まー、英語ができないと、論文も読めな
いし。人と交流できないし,しなくてはならないし、そういう人は出来ないと困るし、でそんな中で、そういう人
が結構周りにいるので、僕は外国に行ったことがないので、それはそういうこともあるかもしれませんが、じゃ
日本人が全員考えた時に、そんな下手かどうか?他の国も、そりゃ英語が母国の国や公用語になっている国は別
としてそうじゃないところで、上から下まで垂直線でデータを集めた時に、本当にそうかなと思うところがあり
ます。うーん、まー留学してきている人の英語は出来ますね。でも留学してこない人達の英語が出来るかどうか
判りません。まー、日本人も留学する人は話せる人が多いのでは。周りを見ているとくっきり分かれるような気
がします。中途半端に話せる人は余りいないと思います。出来ない人たちの特徴は、うーん、まず話そうとしな
い。話そうとしない。読み書きは別にして。いや英語だけです。(Mr.Ka)
Firstly, the student (2) said that any assessment of English proficiency would need to be
specific to a purpose in studying English. Secondly, he contended that the level of English
fluency is a result of students‟ attitudes toward using English, rather than of their language
abilities. Finally, he agreed with the student (1) and stated that the poor reputation of
English proficiency might apply to their oral skills but not to their reading and listening
skills. Overall he does not accept the proposition, finds it too simplistic, and attributes it to
personal traits
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The next student (3) reconsidered the issue:
I wonder whether this strange assumption of low English proficiency is correct or
not. I am not sure about it. I think one origin of the dispute might be pressure from
stakeholders of English such as the Japan Economic Federation. Then, the story
might be exaggerated by capitalist propaganda, which does not reflect students‟
ability. I think it is necessary to reconsider our educational purposes. Since 1980,
the communicative approach has flourished and English literature has disappeared
from English class. Now, scholars emphasize their own expert fields of studies e.g.
literature, linguistics, etc, and EFL becomes the subject of political debates. This is
my real concern for EFL. I am a researcher of a history of English teaching in
Japan and many people ask for my views. Curriculum reform took place in the
Meiji period and similar issues e.g. teachers‟ quality, or error corrections have been
raised repetitively. I hope the same mistake will not be repeated. I cannot trust the
proposition.
そもそも日本人の英語力が低いというのは正しい判断なんですか。わたしも、そのー、客観的に日本人の英語教
育というのが低いのかどうかという命題が正しいかどうか判らないので、私もなんとも言いようがないのですけ
ど。それが正しいかどうか判らないので。多分。経済的な、日本がこれからいわゆるグローバル競争に勝つ為に、
そのー。でー、経済団体とかが文部省に圧力をかけて、そういう流れが見えますよね。だから子供の教育とはそ
もそも何なのか、日本で教育するというのが一体何なのかということを考えずに、結局、資本主義の論理で、子
供を教育するのはなんなのか、でもなー今の教育論理がそうならしょうがないですけど。もう尐し子供の教育は
何なのか考える必要があると思います。1980 年代の Communicative approach 義から英文学がなくなってしまった
と、教材から、それに対して、いわいる保守的な人が出で来て、自分の利害に絡むことを言うわけですよ。英文
学の専門家が出てきて、英文学をやれと。それで自分の専門とするところを教育でやれという、、で、言語学者も
身分のやっているのが面白いと、だから教育に入れろと、だから結局、Ideology 性で、Political であると、それが
私が心配するところで、いやですね。英語教育史をやっている身からすると、英語教育史をやっている身からす
ると、明治の時代もやっているのですね。同じような、教師の質、結局、小学校で間違えて教えるから、中学校
でコレクトする時、問題があるのだとか、そうですね。なんとも言えないのですが、明治と同じ間違いを繰り返
して欲しくないですね。賛成、反対両派があるんですけど、イメージが Politic なのですよ、そこで経団連が入っ
てきたりですね。非常に実態に基づかない議論が行われているように私には思えます。どうも、あまり信用でき
ない。(Mr. Sa)
The student (3) is teaching English and researching the history of English teaching in Japan.
He considered the proposition as being unfair. In the first place, he remarked that this
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negative perception of the proficiency is fashioned by capitalist values of English
education rather than reflecting the needs of students. He pointed out that the dull image of
Japanese learners is created and sustained by dominant groups of society and does not
represent general views. Then, he reconsidered the history of EFL in Japan and said that
similar discussions (i.e. pedagogies, qualities of teachers) took place during the Meiji era
(AD 1868 - 1912) and worried that the recycling of this discussion is detrimental to
progress. Referring to historical prospective of EFL, this student was eager to endorse that
pessimistic views surrounding Japanese students‟ English proficiency was what
stakeholders want people to believe.
The next section will look at the data that show agreement with the belief that Japanese
students have poor language skills. The first student in agreement (4) spoke as follows:
I think that the English proficiency of Japanese students is poor because the
Japanese environment created this situation. First, Japan has achieved an
economical success without English skills, even in a short period. Secondly, Japan
is surrounded by the sea and people living in a homogeneous country tend to be
conservative. In this respect, the U.K. and Japan are both island countries but the
realities on the ground are very different. Japan achieved its economic success
without English skills and the country lacks a sense of crisis because people are
patriotic.
まー出来ない方だと思います。島国という環境と、島国という環境の中で、一時的にでも経済的成功を経験した
こと島国であることで閉鎖的ですし、あまり他国と交流しようとしない。他の国と違ってとにかく、皆、日本人
という意識があるので。日本人どうして内戦するようなことも今ではないですね。
同じ島国でもイギリスと日
本は大分周囲の環境が違がったと思いますね。一度、経済天国にのぼりつめて、英語をやらなくてもやってこら
れたからやはり危機感がないですね。島国だったことということもあると思いますよ。自分は日本が大好きなの
でまーいいんじゃないですか。(Mr. Ha)
The student (4) described the situation through cultural and economic perspectives and
claimed that an alleged conservative nature of the Japanese culture would affect negatively
people‟s motivation to English study. Only looking at the past, he appears to suggest that
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economic success and conservative Japanese people have no need and motivation to
learning a foreign language.
The next student (5) agreed on grounds of his teaching experience:
What is language ability? … I also think I do not have English language skills.
There are many university students majoring in English literature who cannot even
get 600 points in the TOEIC score. The situation is not good at all. TOEIC is to test
only reading and listening skills. However, I think low English ability is a problem
not only in Japan. I think the situation in other countries is similar and so I do not
think it has a biological explanation here. The media introduces only people who
work in an international environment, but the situation of ordinary people would be
the same as in Japan.
なにが語学能力ですか。えーーと、能力がないと思います。自分に関してもないと思います。文学部の英語専修
の 4 年生で TOEIC が 600 ぐらいの学生がざらにいます。それはまずいのではないかといつも思います。そのレベ
ルだとしたら読むことすらちゃんと出来てないのではと思います。TOEIC です。TOEIC は読むのと聞くだけです
よね、聞くのも出来ないのではないかと思います。はい、えーと、日本だけ出来ないというのではなくて、他の
国も実は外で活躍している人以外はあまりできないのではないかと思っていて。というのはテレビで出てる人は
出来る人ばかり写っていて、他の人は、同じ教育レベルのではあまり出来ないのではないかと思います。(Mr. Se)
The student (5) is an English teacher at a well-known Japanese senior high school and
based his agreement on the relatively poor TOEIC marks of his students and on a negative
self-assessment, he agreed with the proposition. However, he remarked that the situation
might be similar in other countries. To an extent, he said that if the current study included
L2 learners from other countries, then the proposition would hold there as well.
Consequently, he suggested that a problem with EFL is not only an agenda in Japan but
visible in other Asian countries.
Next, a female student (6) also agreed on grounds of her experience in Egypt:
I agree that the language skills among Japanese are low. However, it appears that
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the research experts are not worried about the situation. They let it go as it goes. In
Cairo, I attended an international conference discussing life and death. Delegates
from Islamic countries expressed their ideas well, while Japanese speakers spoke
English very slowly as if they were reading the sutra. The attitude was inferior to
the other speakers and they were unwilling to communicate with the international
participants of the conference. Therefore, I consider the assumption correct.
However, it is not only English study that they are slow to take up. In contrast,
Korean people take action swiftly. For example, their action is fast in developing
nuclear reactors. I wish that the Japanese would take on international challenges
more swiftly. This is a prerequisite for securing our present status in the future.
実際にそう思いますが、でも研究者の中にはなんとかなるのではと思っているのではないかと。英語に力をいれ
てないかなーて思うんですけど。それはエジプトで、カイロで学会に出させていただいたのですね。それは、イ
スラムと日本の死に、というより、エジプトと日本の死生観の違いの考え、市に多雤する考えを討論するシンポ
ジウムがあって。それに出させてい頂いた時に感じたことなんですけど。そのイスラムの人たちしっかり自分の
意見を言えていたのですが、それに対して、日本人の人はしどろもどろしていて、文章を読むのも念仏のように
読みますし、日本人の英語に多雤する取り組みって、Communicate しようとしてというよりは、文章を読んでいる
という、それを伝えようとする意思が余り感じられなかったので、まー、その出来ないという指摘は妥当だと思
います。言語だけではなくて、日本人の初動の遅さみたいなものを感じますけど、例えば、なんか、こう、国で
一体になって、流通ビジネスとか原子力とか置いている韓国に日本は競り負けてとられているとかそういうこと、
そういうこと、そういうニュースを見ていると、そこには語学的なもので得意でドンドン出て行ける日本人が臆
さず出ていければ、日本人は出て行けて日本はもっと地位、位置を守っていけるのではないかと思います。. (Ms.
Ho)
On grounds of her experience in Egypt, the student (6) identified two important factors to
confirm the proposition. One was identified as attitudes and the other was identified as
culture trait, which comprised measures of low language proficiency. She pointed out that
a characteristic of slowness was distinctive among Japanese speakers and worried that this
Japanese
characteristic
affected
their
performance
in
English
communication.
Consequently, she seems to agree that there is a cultural explanation. She further suggested
that, today, a low proficiency in English language affects the international outlook. The
students (5) and (6) both agree with the proposition but have a very different outlook on
the issue.
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The next student (7) studied the Arabic language at a university, which specializes in
foreign language studies and agreed with the proposition:
When I was a freshman, I attended a language school in New York City and met
many students from Asian countries, including Japanese students. Japanese students
appear to have willingness to study English, and their grammatical knowledge,
writing, and reading skills are fairly good. However, Japanese students spoke
slowly and lacked desire to communicate with other people in contrast to students
from other countries whose English was not accurate in pronunciation and grammar.
They know that it is important to use English. For example, Taiwanese students
could communicate well without accuracy of English knowledge. Japanese students
lack their desire for communication.
一緒の時期に留学していた日本人もたくさんいたのですけど、彼らも英語を勉強する意思はもちろんありますが、
結構、筆記は出来るのですけど、文法問題だったり reading は結構できるのですけど、あのー、普段の会話が結構
難しくて、しゃべるスピードが遅かったり、そもそもしゃべろうという意欲みたいなものが他の国の人に比べて、
すごく低いなと感じて。他の国の人は結構、文法とかめちゃくちゃだし、発音も結構違ったりするんですけど、
それでもいいからとにかくしゃべることが大事だということをみな共通に思っていて。台湾の人など、文法、結
構違うんだけどけどしゃべれるという人が結構一杯いましたね。やはりしゃべることが大事だと思う気持ちが日
本人は低いと思います。(Ms.Za)
This student (7) agreed with some of the previous speakers in that the negative notion of
low proficiency is attributable to a reluctance of the Japanese students to engage socially.
She also felt that Japanese students spoke English very slowly and that this affected their
interactions. Seemingly, she has the same view as the preceding student (6) in claiming that
there is some kind of biological factor. However, she brought up that Japanese students had
strong syntactic and grammatical knowledge.
The next student (8) agreed implicitly:
I think that English skill in Japan is low. How can I say? It is not English skills but
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rather Japanese people lack wiliness to speak to other people. I do not think that it
is because of a lack of ability of learning.
出来ないと思います。なんだろう。出来ないというより、もともとの問題は積極的にしゃべろうとしないという
のが。
。。能力がないということではないと思います。(Ms. No)
The student (8) is studying international relations and teaching English to some elementary
school pupils. By her teaching and learning experience, she said that Japanese students‟
English proficiency is rather low. She implied that Japanese students‟ oral communication
skills in English is lower than other English skills, which could come from their attitudes
toward English communication.
The next student (9) is a bilingual student and explained the perception from a cultural
standpoint:
Yes, I agree. The low English proficiency is attributed to culture. In Europe, there
are many different cultural identities. In addition, the European education system is
different from that of Japan. Naturally, the social environment influences language
skills. In Australia, the immigrant identity is a frequent occurrence. For example,
there were 30 students in my high school and only one student whose parents were
both born in Australia. In this respect, Australians are motivated to study foreign
languages. For instance, many people speak both English and Chinese.
はい、そうだと思います。そうですね、根本的に、問題を言うと、本当に、教育方法がちがうとことはあるとは
思いますが、ヨーロッパでは環境が違うというか、家庭が混ざっているというのが大きいと思います。でもシド
ニーもそういう意味では、Asia でも違うんですが、シドニーってアジアに近いので、中国語との Bilingual が多い
です。オーストラリア人は割合、外国語を習いたいと思っていると思います。オーストラリアは multiple identity と
いうことをもっていますが、でも Australia はアジアの一部という Identity を持ちはじめている。オーストラリアも
アメリカ人もなにが人種というのが判らないオーストラリア人はなんなのか、移民国家としてのアイデンティテ
ィーが強い。たとえば、私の同級生は30人いて両親ともオーストラリア人だという人は一人しかいなかったで
す。そうですね、私はイギリスとアメリカに住んだ事がないので判りませんが、アメリカより語学を習おうとい
う事が強いと思います。(Ms. To)
This student (9) had her education in three countries: at an American school for her
elementary education, at a Japanese private school for her junior high school and at an
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Australian high school. From these educational experiences, she spoke about social
environment, and pointed out a facet of second language that is identity. She said that
family cultures (e.g. mixed parents, multilingual country) affect language skills. She meant
that L2 skills thrive in immigrant cultures in Europe and Australia, whereas L2 skills in
homogeneous countries as in Japan are lower.
Finally, the data analysis turns to the students‟ views who disagree with the proposition.
The first student in disagreement (10) said that the assumption is theoretically inconsistent
because of inappropriate use of data:
The reliability of the argument depends on the supporting data. I do not think that
research data of this kind of study is convincing. To begin with, take China as an
example, where the percentage of students who advance from school to university
is much lower than in Japan. Thus, Chinese university students belong to an elite
group. In Japan, most senior high school graduates advance to universities.
Consequently, English skills i.e. TOEIC scores of Chinese students are higher. If
you compare students in Chulalongkorn University (Thailand) and this (elite)
Tokyo University, the result would be compatible and reliable. In short, the media
coverage refers to inappropriate data to claim the low language proficiency because
the data is limited to those from internet poll participants. I felt that Chinese
students in the southern part of China speak English better than students in the
northern region do. I visited the Microsoft Company for my internship and our
meeting was in English. When I spoke to a German student in China, our English
communication was not so fluent. After all, I feel that I cannot blame Japanese
students‟ insufficient communicative skills in English. It does not mean that
Japanese students were lacking in English ability because the issue is not
convincingly proven. More generally, the position is not logical because there are
no differences in human abilities at students‟ level.
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それは評価によりますね。私は、今の評価が必ずしも平均を比べているとは思いません。たとえば中国の場合、
大学までいく割合が日本とは同じではないです。大学に行っている時点でかなり、かなりトップの人たちですよ
ね。それでその人たちの平均を取っているわけなので、なおさら東南アジアとか対人とか、考えると、日本人は
ほとんどの人が大学へ行ける環境ですよね。そう考えると、全体の平均を取っている数字と、トップの平均を取
ってくる数字では、
例えばチュラロンコーン大学の学生さんと東大の学生さんの普通を比べるなら判りますけ
ど、しきも、Toffle の成績なんてどういう風にあつめているかわかりませんし。例えばインターネットの調査だっ
たり知ると、インターネットを持っている人じゃないと答えられないので、調査参加者がかぎられますのね。特
に発展途上国だと。とくに一般的に中国に行った経験から行きますと、東部の学生は上手いです。インターに行
った時のマイクロソフトの研究所では普通のミーティングも英語でやっているところです。でも私と、もう一人
ドイツから来た学生さんと何の問題なく英語が話せるかというと、そうでもない。やはり、そう考えると必ずし
も日本人が得意でないとは忌めないと思います。私はそんなに基本的な能力というものにどの部分もそんな大差
がないと思います。例えばオリンピックとは黒人選手が速いとか言われていますが、トップレベルというときに
は話は別ですが、中学校レベルでは日本人とも外国人ともないとないと思います。(Ms. Ku)
This student (10) first pointed out that the study uses skewed data to compare English
skills in different countries. Secondly, she said that language proficiency is regionally
different. Lastly, she mentioned her experience of intercultural communication with
European non-native speakers of English and implied that the fluency in English does not
depend on ethnicity. All her comments revealed that having English skills involves more
than language ability and she thinks that international comparisons are unfair to Japanese.
The next student (11) said that the perception of low English proficiency of Japanese
students is distorted:
I did not see many students from Asian countries at UCLA. However, I perceived
there that the Japanese students‟ listening proficiency was quite good. In another
words, their listening skills were the highest in the class. Overall, Japanese students
narrowly missed to achieve highest or have equivalent skills to other non-native
learners.
そうですね。アジアの中で、アジアの人と UCLA でかかわることがなかったので良く判らないのですが。英語が
出来ないと、Listening Base はしっかりできていると、ベースはやはり世界 top class だと思うのです。だからもう
ちょっとのところであっという間に。(Mr. Ot)
This student (11) attended an English conversation course in summer and returned to Japan
one month before the interview. From his fresh memory, he said that he did not see any
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notable differences of language skills relating to nationality. He implied that the image of
Japanese students‟ language skills is prejudiced and rather an issue of introverts versus
extroverts. In UCLA, he said that the Japanese students had good listening skill, which
does not require shared experiences. It implied that the negative perception is a result of
prejudice.
Summary
This section reviewed students‟ views of communicative EFL abilities of Japanese. Nearly
all students were either neutral or agreed with the negative perception of L2 skills.
However, two students said that Japanese students had comparable or even higher skills
excepting oral skills in English. The students who agreed with the proposition had the
following explanations: geographical isolation from other countries, slow delivery of
speech, a lack communicative skill, reticent attitudes toward English use attributed to
anxieties, and conservative attitudes derived from a homogeneous culture. One student (6)
appears to worry that a lack of oral performance may risk the security of the country. The
student (3) said that there is political intervention by interest groups, insufficient lessons of
communicative skills, and a goal to pass educational requirements, which fail to raise
students as independent thinkers.
Some students suggested that an L2 skill is not solely predicted from knowledge learned in
the classroom but results from affective, cultural, personal and pedagogical factors. Male
students are concerned with lack of EFL goals apart from tests, grades and academic
achievement, whereas the female students appear to worry more about the issues of using
English to communicate with people with other cultures. It is no surprise that this question
is not only a language matter in a narrow sense but is more squarely part of an agenda for
foreign language study.
In the following section, I shall look at students‟ achievement of
English language skills.
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2 - i) What are the students‟ levels of, their attitudes towards
and their opportunities for learning English?
In this section, the students‟ self-evaluation of their English skills will be presented. More
specifically, there are two purposes to this section: to discuss the attitudes of the students 1)
to some of their competences; and 2) toward their opportunities to acquire these
competences. Here, attitudes are socially embedded values (i.e. negative or positive
feelings) (Bertram, 2010:12) that the students have. I was interested in the students‟ skill
ratings as individual judgments of their own proficiency, relying on neither certificates nor
the results of achievement tests. In particular, it was not necessary or important to know
their scores in these tests. The reason for this is that the students in this study had to
achieve a minimum level in English to get into the university and the students achieved
passing marks. However, at the interviews, some reserved students were reluctant to talk
about their competencies. To this core trait, the frustration at not having the necessary
skills (e.g. oral skills) to match their self-efficacy appeared frequently. Reticence is seen as
one category of frustration. Before the interview began, the author asked the students to fill
in a form (see appendix 2) to ask the students to describe their best English skills and least
developed skills.
Hereafter this section starts by presenting a brief summary of the results of their
self-assessments and then the analysis will proceed by presenting students‟ verbal answers.
As it turned out, six students identified listening as their best English skill, while speaking
was the best for four students and reading for four students. Nevertheless, writing was
perceived to be the most challenging skill. Seven students perceived speaking as their most
limited skills, while writing for four students, listening for three students, and reading for
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one student were their most limited skills.
The structure of this section is organized into three groups of students. The first group
deals with the L2 learners of English who had English education before they entered junior
high school. The data analysis in the second group will proceed to the students without
English education before they entered junior high school. The last group of the students
studied in an L1 environment abroad.
Now, let us look at the description of the students with early English education. The first
student (1) described his listening skill.
The listening skill is the best for me, but the speaking skill is not satisfactory, and
reading and writing are at acceptable levels. The result of TOEFL or TOEIC
showed that to me. My worst skill is the oral skill. The second best skill is writing. I
think I am good at listening because I began learning English early when I was a
kindergartener. I had a hard time to write the alphabet in primary school days. At
Juku, I was involved a lot with NETs in English and NNETs played an observation
role in the back to help students. They used the Japanese language only when
students could not understand the NET. In this semester, I am taking an English
course, and I will take another English course in the next semester. Those lessons
are not statutory requirements.
Listening が得意でしゃべることはあまり得意でなくて、読み書きはある程度出来ると思います。テストの結果で、
学校のテストで、Listening が点が良かったりするので、そう感じます。
(不得意なスキルは)Speaking。
(二番目に
得意な英語のスキル)えーと、Writing だと思います。小学校の前くらいからずっと習いはじめたのが良かったと
思います。小学校のころアルファベットがなかなか覚えられなかったことか。そのくらいでしょうか。TOEIC と
か TOEFL の点数が他の人よりいいのでそう思います。小学校のころから塾に行っていたのですが、
その時にまー、
結構大量の英語を聞いていたので、それで得意になったのだと思います。直接です。はい, そうです。簡単なとこ
ろは英語でなさって、どうしても判らない大変なところは日本語で説明していただきました。英語の授業がひと
つあります。この学期は、それほかにも英語の??というものがあります。必修ではないですね。(Mr. Su)
This was the first interview at the department of acoustic engineering, and the first
interviewee (1) spoke briefly, and inserted pauses between the answers – which might
suggest a lack of certainty- when speaking about his listening skill, which is considered
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difficult for Japanese students (Saegusa and Gay, 1988). Then, the author asked a
follow-up question of how he developed the listening skills. “I think it was learned from
English conversation with NETs for over 12 years. [小学校のころから塾に行っていたのですが、その時に
まー、結構大量の英語を聞いていたので、それで得意になったのだと思います。12年ぐらいです、学問としてです。]
He
suggested that he acquired his listening skills by practice in EFL environment. The acoustic
characteristics of English such as rhythm control, stress, and unstressed durations in
English are different from Japanese, which causes difficulty in listening. This student
learned to listen to them at young age by NETs speakers in classroom composition.
The next female student (2) also studied acoustic engineering and said:
I began attending English classes when I was 9 to 10 years old. My oral skills stood
out. I am not good at listening and writing. I did not have English-speaking
environment at home, but my parent studied French and taught me French
vocabulary. I am blessed with luck. My father always told me that I have nice
people around me as I need. For example, if I want to study Chinese, there are
many Chinese people in front of me. If I want to study English, I meet linguists. I
think the environment affected me the most. I do not have much fear of
communicating with other people in English in daily conversation. Spoken English
does not require correct grammar rules. I do not have a memory of studying the
English language enthusiastically. English proficiency did not improve much while
I was preparing for the entrance examinations, but my level of English improved a
lot when I made friends with whom I spoke English. I am gifted with
communicative skills and I enjoy it. I think I learned English communicative skills
by using it. For example, a visiting Swiss linguist gave me English lessons once a
week while I was helping his data management on the computer. English has
improved a lot from this experience. Considering non-native English speakers in
Europe, if we have negative perception of ourselves in that European English
164
speakers are much better than Japanese. We feel uncomfortable communicating
with Europeans.
9 歳か十歳ごろから塾にいきました。そういうことはありません。特に英語がということはほとんどありません。
ただ、父と母がフランスで勉強していたので、フランス語の単語を教えてくれたり、意味を教えてくれたりとか、
小さい時からありました。私はすごく運がいいので、父にもよく言われましたが、出会う人たちがものすごくタ
イミングも人もすごくいい人たちが多くて。例えば中国語を勉強したいと思ったら中国人がずらーと目の前にい
たりとか、英語を勉強したいと思ったらを専門にやっている人が身近にいたりだとか、私としては環境が一番大
きかったと思います。私は話す事が一番楽です。 聞くことと書くことはそれほど得意ではないです。普通に暮ら
す分には英語に不足ないです。というのはこれはスピーチではないので、多尐文法が違っていてもかまわないの
で。でも、不思議なことに、語学に関しては努力して覚えたことは経験が私はあまりなんですね。例えば受験英
語に関しても、私はあまり受験英語を余りしたことがなし、ほとんどしてこなかったけど、英語に限らず、中国
語にしても英語にしても、受験勉強をしている時はあまり伸びなかったんですけど、逆に受験を離れた時に友達
ができた時に、急に伸びたと思います。これは Communication 能力だと思いますが、それだったら私は得意だと
思います。そういう風に、覚えようとしていない時の方が、覚えようとしているときよりも、ぼけーと自然に聞
いている時の方が、もっと上手くなると思いますね。というのは、私が言語学の先生にお目にかかった時、週一
回づつ英語を教えてくれたんです。べつにお金を取ったりするわけではないですが、同じ研究室にいた言語学の
先生でスイス人の方ですが、その方とレッスン以外の時間によく話してしたのですけど、レッスン以外の話なの
で、覚えようとしていないので、なおさら良く覚えます。例えばヨーロッパから来た人と話していると、その人
たちは英語ができるわけではないので、一対一で話していると、この人は出来るのに自分は出来ないのだと思っ
ていると、しゃべれるものもしゃべれなくなると思います。 (Ms. Ku)
This PhD student (2) appeared comfortable and confident during the interview and had a
positive attitude towards English. In contrast to the previous students (1), she enjoys oral
communication in English. Firstly, she said that her family environment had good
influence on her positive attitude to communicate with others. Then, she has no anxiety in
communicating in English. Secondly, she noted that oral communication is enjoyable
because oral communication does not require following rigid grammatical rules. Thirdly,
she described the notion of cooperative attitudes in face-face communication. It may imply
that the mutual understanding is solidified by cooperative attitudes toward intercultural
communication. Fourthly, similar to the student (1), she voluntarily created opportunities to
use English outside class. She showed that learners‟ attitudes towards the use of English
affect development of different English skills. She showed how environment outside
classroom influenced the development of her English skills.
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In contrast to the previous one, the next student (3) finds oral skills difficult.
I attended English conversation lessons by NETs since my fifth grade of primary
school for five years, following my parents` wishes. I sometimes felt embarrassed
to speak English. Later it became my will to attend English classes. I do not have
any proficient English skills now, but my reading my might be better than my other
skills. Reading English journal is important for my study and I use English mainly
for academic purposes. I sometimes speak with exchange students at the university.
The students are clearly divided into two types; some students enjoy English
communication wholeheartedly while the others do not try to make use of it. As for
myself, recently, I wish to improve my reading skills to read research journals. I
used to check words in a dictionary. Today, I am trying to read English without
„word to word translation‟ because I understand the context. I am now making
efforts to understand English in English.
(Primary school 5th grade) 会話中心でした。両親の意向だったと思います。自分がどう思っていたか良く覚えてい
ません。Sometimes, feel embossed to speak English). はい、多尐そういうこともありました。グループでした。そう
ですね。自分の意思でした。あー、どれも今一ですけど、そうですね、しいて言うなら読むぐらいです。えーと、
やはり、大学関係で、論文は英語のものがたくさんあるので、それを読んだり、留学生の方とお話を聞いたりす
る必要もありますし、英語で聞く必要もありますし、まー, ほとんど大学関係です。周りを見ているとくっきり分
かれるような気がします。中途半端に話せる人は余りいないと思います。出来ない人たちの特徴は、うーん、ま
ず話そうとしない。話そうとしない。読み書きは別にして。いや英語だけですとにかく、論文をすらすらと読め
るようになりたいし。英語の単語を調べたり、ただ、あまり日本語を入れたりして、訳しながら読むのは好きじ
ゃないので。日本語が入ると日本語に惑わされて判らなくなるので、なるべく英語のままでおきたいと努力して
います。(Mr. Ka)
This engineering student (3) also studied English before taking it at junior high school.
However, in contrast to the previous student (1, 2), he did not develop any proficient
English skills and he thought his oral skill was unsatisfactory. He supported the student (2)
in that people who have interest in communicating in English voluntarily look for
opportunities to use it. Today, he wishes to improve his reading skills for his study. It
appears that his attitude toward English study is a typical of Japanese students who have a
general desire to do well on English study but lack of opportunities to improve it. It may
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suggest that motivation is prerequisite in studying a foreign language. So far, whether there
is gender difference in oral skills is not yet shown in this study.
Now we will proceed with the other female student (4).
I have lived in an English- speaking environment when I was young and therefore I
was able to start learning English at junior high school with joy. English is a
compulsory subject for all students for two years at the university and the marks in
exams count towards the degree; my reading and listening marks are consistently
high. I am not good at debate. I think my experience of staying in the UK at an
early age provided me an advantage. Sometimes, I wish to have stayed longer to
retain my English proficiency of my young age. I returned to Japan at the age of six
and I lost English fluency at that time. However, my English pronunciation is better
than that of other students. Consequently, I was able to enjoy my English study.
個人的にも小さい頃から英語を触れる機会があったからこそ中学校から抵抗感なく英語の勉強が出来てきたので、
大学入って、文系も理系も二年間は共通過程になっているので, 点数として安定して取れるのはやはり、reading と
Listening ですね。自分の中で足りないスキルが Discussion skill だと思っていっていたのですけど。六歳で帰ってか
ら小学校の間、英語を使ったことがないので、はやり一度休憩機関が出来たということで、リセットされた感が
あって、特に文法だったり単語とはそういった知識レベルはリセットされて、中学校の普通の勉強としてスター
トしたと思うのですけど、そのー、発音の部分は実際に小さい時から聞いていたことで、秀でている部分があっ
て、それによって、それに英語に対しての苦手意識だとかそういったものがほとんどなかったので、それで、個
人的にいやだとか、まー、気が楽だとか、英語嫌いにならずにやってこれたのがで行って良かったと思いますね。
(Ms. Hi)
This student (4) lived in an English speaking country at young age. After returning to Japan,
she was not able to keep her English skill except for her pronunciation. Interestingly, she
did not talk about speaking skills, but she said that she is not good at debate skills. It
appears that oral skills and gender might not have direct relation. Then, she said that early
exposure of English has positive effects on her pronunciation. It might imply „musical
intelligence (Gardner 1991) which considers that musical sensitivity such as rhythm, pitch
and some others has developed at early age. Then, the student appears to agree with the
student (1) that acoustic input at early age has good effect on listening.
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Secondly,
although she forgot her English skills, her experience of living in the UK gave a positive
effect to develop positive attitudes toward English learning. It suggests that different
cultural experiences would have positive effects on self-efficacy. This student and the
student (1) showed that aural input at young age remains without efforts to keep it.
The next student (5) is a high achiever in the TOEIC and TOEFL tests:
I began learning English at Juku when I was a third grader at primary school for
one year. At Juku, we listened to native speakers‟ English on tape and I learned
listening skill. It was worth spending this year there. I did not attend English Juku
from fourth until sixth grade because I was preparing for the entrance exams for
junior high school. At junior high school, I did fairly well in English. I learned the
alphabet for the first time, and struggled to learn writing especially with cursive
writing. By the third grade of junior high school, my listening was good because I
practice a lot by oral reading of the textbooks. From this experience, I think the oral
reading of textbooks is good to acquire English skills.
英語塾というものもありましたし。三年生の時は一年やったのですが、小学校456年は中学受験があったので、
英語はやっていないで、やっている暇がないです。英語は三年生の時にちょっとやったのです。テープを良く聞
いていたので、英語の発音はこういうものだということをよくわかって。そういう意味では生きていたと思いま
す。ええ、NETの先生が発音するものを聞いて、こういう発音だということを習ったので、変だなーとか日本
語と違うのかと思いました。あの、絵があって、その時は意味が判るのですね。絵があったので、字ではなく絵
です。それで、tape recorder から、This is milk. なんて流れてくるんです、それでみんなで|”milk “ なんて言うので
す。いや、あのー、単語のケースもたくさんありましたね。いやー、なにもこうしなくちゃいけないということ
はなにもなかったです。私は教科書をよく音読をしていたのですよ、それで文章をよく覚えちゃうので、それで
教科書に出てきたものがそのままぱぱっと出てきちゃうんですね。対忚できたから、だから教科書を音読すれば
かなり出来るかなーって思いました。(Mr.Sa)
This PhD student (5) had a positive attitude toward English learning. In contrast to the
previous student, this student did not have English- speaking friends outside school. He is
one of the highest core earners on TOEFL and TOEIC and he assessed that his reading and
writing skills are excellent while listening and speaking are good in four levels. He agreed
with the student (1, 4) in that early learning had positive effects in his English skills (i.e.
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listening). However, unlike the other students (7), his achievement of English skills has
mainly relied on self-study. In other part of interview, he said that he enjoyed English study
owing to his teacher at junior high school. It implies that teacher-student relationships
affect English learning. Today, he is an English teacher and a researcher of history of
English teaching in Japan.
Similarly, the next early learner (6) is an English teacher and a PhD student:
I have attended an English conversation class during my kinder garden years,
which was taught by NETs. I continued until I was in the first year in high school. I
still cannot distinguish /l/ and /r/. However, I did not have opportunities to use
English in daily life. Therefore, early learning experience was good. It is not only
an issue of early starting, but also of attitude, because the learning context at Junior
high school is not difficult; the students feeling toward English study affects their
proficiency. English study is still difficult for me, but I had an advantage when I
entered to junior high school. For example, I already learned how to change
assertive sentences into interrogative sentences at Juku. Therefore, early Juku was
good, because I learned Basic English knowledge. I had advantage to learn a new
subject at junior high school. I acquired lexical knowledge through reading.
However, I cannot read and understand entire texts (i.e. long text). Therefore, I
recommend teaching reading skills and pronunciation rather than oral practice at
Japanese school, which eventually develop listening skills within the limited school
hours. I already know that I wanted to be an English teacher when I entered to the
university.
英会話の塾には高校一年生まで行っていましたが、途中に途切れた時はありましたが。好きというより、昔から
やっていたので生活の一部になっていました。 はい、ずっと同じ学校に行っていました。えーとですね、恥ずか
しい話ですが、/L/と/R/は、自分で発音ができるのですが、実は、聞いていて今の/‟l/か/r/といわれると、はっきり、
それほど区別がつかないのですね。 (Juku) ツールとして使うというのは、普段使えないので、使えたということ
が良かったと思います。うーん、やっぱり良かったと思います。臨界期云々というよりは、motivation の問題で、
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中学校で入る時点で、受け答えの仕方を知っていたので、advantage があったので、英語をまっさらの状態で始め
るよりは、ずっと、あのー。良かったなーと思います。中学校一年というのは大体気持ちの問題だと思うので、
普段の会話のなかで疑問文の作り方など、染み付いていれば、疑問なくスムーズに移行できると思う。えーと、
今でも難しいと思っていますけど、というのは、基本的な事を教えて頂いているので、新たに習うのとは多尐慣
れているという Advantage があったにで、そう意味では良かったと思います。移行がスムーズに出来たという意
味でよかったと思います。中学校の時点では短いですが、高校以上になってきて時々、サイドリーダーがあって、
それを読み続ける持久力がなかったということが一番苦労したところです。vocabulary は読む中で獲得してきたと
思います。習ったものもあるし、自分で、学校で習ったものもあるし。そうです。うーん、限られた中であれば、
読むこと、speaking というよりは発音を鍛えることが大切だと思います。というのは、流暢にしゃべれるかどうか
は、使う機会が余りないので無理かなと。そこまでできるのかなと思いますが、発音はちゃんとした先生に習え
ればある程度は判るようになるので、正しい発音を習えば、と教授が言っているので、出来る事はそのあたりが
良いと思います。あと、聞く事も出来る様になると思います。それが学校でできるぎりぎりのところなのかなと
思います。一番尐ない労力で点数になったという気がします。大学に入る時点でもう英語の教員になる気持ちになっ
ていたので、そういう風に考えれば大学一年生だと思います。 (Mr. Se)
This early starter of English study (6) appreciated his early English education at Juku that
motivated him to be an English teacher. He rated that his reading skill is the most
developed while speaking is the least developed and listening and writing is average.
During the interview, the author thought that this student was different from the previous
student (1) in that he had a negative attitude toward his English achievement levels.
However, from his early learning experience, he suggested that, firstly, attitudes toward
English study affect the proficiency in English study. Secondly, unlike the students (1, 4),
he still struggles with distinct blind spots. The difference between the student (1) and this
student (6) is that, although both students learned from NETs from kindergarten days, the
first student learned the alphabet earlier than the latter student did during their early
education of English. It might imply that visual and aural input is more effective than only
aural input for EFL learners. Fourthly, apart from early learning experience, the student (6)
mentioned his difficulties of comprehensive reading. I note here that reading requires not
only linguistic knowledge but also contextual understanding. It may imply that anxiety
may affect reading. Then, for instruction, he suggested that teaching pronunciation rather
than speaking and reading skills are important and the only feasible goals to improve
English skills, which also improves listening skills within the congested time schedule of
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school at Japanese school.
The next student (7) who is studying Arabic at a university specializing in foreign language
answered the question indirectly:
I attended a private school and learned English as a compulsory subject starting
from the first grade. My speaking is the most developed skill. I developed the oral
skills from my experience with many American classmates in Egypt. I also studied
English in New York City when I was a freshman. I tried to follow English
conversation at a natural speed. I also learned English from the school textbooks.
Speaking が一番得意だと思います。それはカイロの語学学校の同級生がアメリカ人だったので、休み時間に英語
でしゃべらなくてはいけなかったとか、大学一年生の時に NYC へ行って語学を沢山使う機会があったとか、とう
のもあるので、そういう経験を積むことによって他の人より話す能力が高くなったと思いますし、あと、なんと
いいますか、しゃべる時に、文法とか正しさとかを重要視しないようにしていて、それより、スピードとか会話
の流れについていくようにしているのが会話をする上では大事なのかと思っていて、話す時はそれを大切にして
います。(教科書は) 役に立ったと思います。(Ms Za)
This female early learner (7) is different from the student (4) in that she learned English
from early age at language school due to her parents‟ wishes. As a result, she was quite
good at English in her school life. She said that speaking is the best skill while she rated
her listening “good” while reading and writing average. She appears to enjoy
communicating in English and, in contrast to the previous student, she paid more attention
to fluency rather than accuracy. Then, she noted that she learned English knowledge
through reading of school textbooks. Interestingly, although the student (6) and (7) have
different focuses on ES, both students agreed in that reading is one of the most important
skills at school. It may suggest that reading is the most important skills for EFL learners.
Unexpectedly, later at the university, she discovered that there are noticeable differences in
English between English learners in an EFL environment and those in an ESL environment.
Her story continues in Research question 9.
The next section will look at the second group of students who did not attend the English
171
lesson at a young age.
The next student (8) is studying acoustic engineering and briefly said:
I do not have any successful English skill. English skill is poorer than anyone else‟s
is. I could not learn English via grammar and conversation studies, and I tried to
systematically memorize English vocabulary.
得意なものがないくらいです。
・率直に言って自分より下はいないのではないかと思うぐらいです。得意なものが
ないです。自分は、もう、自然に習得することができなかったのでシステマチックに、そのー、ひたすら英単語
とその対語をひたすら丸暗記しました。 (Mr. Ha)
This student (8) is studying acoustic engineering to develop a system to analyze non-native
speakers‟ English pronunciation. This student (8) had a clear opinion on every interview
questions and spoke quietly throughout interview. He rated his four skills in English as
unsatisfactory. He said that he failed to learn English skills. At the interview, the author felt
that the question was difficult to answer for him due to his modesty. Following this, the
author asked about his motivation and goal of English Study (ES).
English was dispensable at school. Today I need to read research articles in English
and work with computer in English. I have not had any goal of English study. I
rarely think about setting goals.
やっぱり単純に必要不可欠だったから。変わらないです。論文も読まなくてはならないし、コンピューターも英
語でさわらなくてはいけない。自分はゴールは設定していないと思います。まーあまり自分はそういうことはし
ないです。 (Mr. Ha)
A problem here is his narrow interests in ES. He illustrated that Japanese school have
failed to provide a primary impetus for the students to study English. For example, there is
a lack the chance to test his English skills. Nevertheless, from this perspective, he appeared
not to be anxious about his English proficiency.
He may need extra support as to “Why I
do?” or “What I do?” to provide a consistent learning motivation. On the other hand, those
who had more desire to communicate with NSs had set their own goal to use English and
had a higher degree of satisfaction in their English skills. He showed that there is a need of
critical awareness that students can experience ES in different ways.
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The next student (9) spoke about difficulties of oral skills:
Indeed, English is the most important subject in applying for universities. Therefore,
I set my goal towards English to achieve higher scores on the TOEIC test. Together
with my fellow students, I took the Eiken exam in my junior high school. We aimed
to pass the third level in the second grade. At school, I needed to learn a variety of
vocabulary with the same meaning for university entrance examinations. To take
„endure‟ as an example, we must memorize the synonyms such as „put- up- with‟,
„stand with‟ and a few more. In addition, we memorized many grammatical rules,
which are not significant in daily conversation. This is my enduring memory of
English study. It was difficult to study for communicative skills since the oral skill
is not included in TOEIC and we could not have any assessment of that skill.
やはりどこを受けるにしても文系理系にしても、やはり英語は最重要科目だと思いますし、東大を受ける時には
もウエイトは高いですので。学生時代は受験がゴールでしたし、最近ではやはりが、何点取りたいとかを Motivation
でやっていますし、まだ TOEIC があまり高くないのでいま当面それを目的として勉強しているのですけど、最後
はやはり、Communication がやっぱり出来るようになるのと、ただこの、あのー、TOEIC は点数がしっかりあるの
で、点数がはっきりしているので浮けど、Communication がどの位できたらいいのかと、これはやっぱりチョッと
抽象的で、なんとなくちょっとそれがはっきりしなくてふわふわしているのでそれはどうしようかなと。例えば
我慢するという意味があったとすると、Endure、Put Up with、stands with , マーもっといくつかあったと思うので
すけど、それを全部覚えて、また Put Up with だったら Catch up with といったような単語があって、また、その違
いを覚えたりとか。とか, あと、文法、多分、日常会話ではあまり使わないのではないか問う文法、言い回しをた
くさん覚えされられるというのが辛かったかなー。(Mr Ot)
This student (9) appears to be confident about his achievement and articulate in interview.
During the interview, I felt that this student is different from the previous student in that he
said; “I have had school rivals throughout my life. I appreciate my family as well who sent
me to private schools. Finally and the most of all, I have worked my best that I am proud
of it.
つねにライバルがいましたし、やはり両親、やっぱり私立に通わせてもらった両親、塾にも通わせてもらった環境
もそうですが、最終的には、やっぱり、がんばって自分自身で努力して、自分自身で勝ち取ってきたという自負はあります。
However they are similar in that they attended private school in Tokyo to apply for elite
universities. In his student (9) private school, all were required to take an English exam
(i.e.EIKEN, TOEIC) and the results were used to advance to higher education. He rated
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that reading is average while other skills are unsatisfactory. He mentioned that his goal of
studying English was the university entrance exam, which was the prime goal of his school.
This made him work hard to develop reading and writing skills. He experienced frustration
about this kind of repetitive learning, which did not develop language competence. He
rated speaking as his lowest skill. Nonetheless, he perceived that the concept of
communicative competence is vague and hard to measure without assessment. The trouble
with students without English opportunities in their life is that the oral skill is difficult to
learn without assessment tools. He showed that, in Japan, English is the first and the
foremost important subject for entrance examinations to higher education. Consequently,
the programs offered English in junior and senior high schools. Thus, similar to the
previous student (8) the students engage in memorizing vocabulary/idiomatic expressions.
The next student (10) spoke about how she succeeded in English without early learning.
Oral skills are the worst. Speaking was better when I was practicing it at Juku. Now,
I would like to improve my weak skills of English, which are writing and speaking
skills. My friends feel the same way, that since it is difficult to develop oral skills,
some friends are taking English lessons by NETs, or go abroad to improve oral
skills. Consequently, I feel that we can develop listening and reading skills by
ourselves, but writing and oral skills require opportunities and feedback from an
audience.
やっぱり、Speaking が一番出来ないです。集中的にやっていた時は、というのは、英語でしゃべる習慣があった。そうい
う時は良かったんですけど、そこから離れてしまって。そうですね。でも、足りてないところを伸ばしたいなというところ
があります。なんで、私の場合、英語で自分を表現をする力が足りないと思いますので、それは Writing や Speaking だと思
います。はい、それを感じている友人も多く、自主的に英会話学校へ行ったり、留学にいったりとかしたりして、そういうのを
見ていて、それをみていて自分で足りないのは、Listening と Reading は自分でも出来るのですけど、場がないとなかなか
できないのは Writing と Speaking だと思います。 (Ms. Ho)
This student (10) had been helpful throughout the interview and introduced her friends to
participate in the interview. She appeared to be successful at academic achievement
throughout her school life. Comparing her English skills to returnees in the university, she
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rated her reading as the most developed while her speaking the least, and her writing and
listening skills as average. She stated that speaking and writing skills are difficult skills due
to lack of opportunities. This student agreed with the student (4) in that EFL and ESL
learners had gaps in their level of English achievement. They agreed in that the difference
between L1 and L2 learners might be in their oral skills.
The next student (11) spoke similarly:
I attended a Catholic school for my junior and senior school and the school
focused on English reading and writing skills. My reading is good. Speaking is
very poor and I wish I had more time to use English. First, Japanese students feel
awkward to communicate with other people. Willingness to communicate with
other people is more important than worrying about using correct pronunciation.
The writing skills are also important.
高校も本当に読み書きばかりで、だから英語の論文は普通に読めるのです、しゃべるのは本当に苦手で「もっと
しゃべる時間を作ってほしかったな。」と思います。日本人はしゃべることに苦手意識をもつ。何でもいいからと
にかくしゃべろうという気にならないと。発音というより、こだわらずに、そんな発音より、とにかく話せるよ
うに、そういう姿勢を先に作って欲しいと思います。やはり、文字が判らないと。 (Ms. No)
This student (11) rated similarly to the previous student (10) in that her listening, speaking,
and writing skills as unsatisfactory and her reading skill as average in the questionnaire.
Then, she pointed out that Japanese people are not good at oral skill due to their lack of
communicative willingness rather than lack of language skills. Then, for instruction, she
suggested schools to help students to develop communicative skills. She recommended
teaching speaking and writing skills concurrently at school. These four students in the
second group showed that oral skill is the final skill to appear for EFL students. These
students‟ (8, 9, 10, 11) main goal of English was for academic needs. Compared to the early
learners, it appears that early education provided by parents has impact on the students‟
achievement for a long time. It implies that students‟ achievement of ES is judged in the
historical context of ES.
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Finally, the data analysis turns to the bilingual students who studied English outside of
Japan and were at that stage not primarily motivated by the hurdle of the Japanese entrance
examinations.
The next student (12) lived abroad for 8 years.
I did not have much experience in writing long essays and my writing skill is the
most difficult. Native speakers have more vocabulary, which made me realize that I
was not a native English speaker. I enjoyed reading and read three times more
Japanese books than English books. My handwriting of the alphabet was not neat
and I had a difficult time to learn the alphabet writing. In terms of grammar
knowledge, I relied on my intuition in the university entrance exams. Articles were
still difficult. For writing, Japanese teachers do not teach writing skills, and it is
better to learn writing skills from NETS. For listening, I comprehend almost
everything. I think my listening skill is the best. I need to improve my writing skill.
ただやっぱり英語が第二言語だなと感じるのは語彙がやっぱり尐ないと思っているのですよね。もともと僕、本
を読むのが好きで、結構海外にいる間も、土曜日に補修校があって、日本語学校があったのですが、そこで図書
室があって、読書量では日本語の本をたくさん読みました。日本語の本は英語より三倍ぐらい余計に読みました
ね。作文は、あまり長い文をあまり書いたことがなかったので、苦労しました。あと、Handwriting は、ちょっと、
字が汚かったので。なかなかきれいにかけなかったのが辛かったですね。ほとんど講読でしたけど,僕の場合はそ
ういうのを問題を解く場合でもいちいち文法的に考えないで、感で、たとえば黙読してこれがふさわしいなと思
ったら、自分でドンドン黙読しながら、どんどんうめていったんですが、そこが日本で取り組んできた人と違う
んです。はい、大体あたるんですよ。ただ一番難しいのは Article、a とか the とか、品詞、あれはいくら練習して
も出来なかった。難しいですね。日本人の先生はエッセーとかは教えてくれないのですね。はやり A4一枚くら
い書くではないですか。そういう時は外国人の方がいいです。案外、Listening が得意だと思います。はい、判り
ます。やはり全部大事だと思いますけどね。 やはり、Writing につきますね。専門的な文章を書いたり、Formal
な手紙を書いたりする機会が増えると思うのですけど、そういったフォーマルな英語をどんどん書いていってこ
なしていかなければいけないと思います。
(Mr. Ta)
This bilingual freshman (12) returned to Japan to apply for mathematics study. He rated his
listening skill highly, while his writing skill is lower than other skills. Firstly, he increased
his vocabulary by reading and noted that the lack of vocabulary put him at a disadvantage
to native speakers. Secondly, he has no problem understanding oral communication.
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Interestingly, similarly to the student (1, 5), he found that the alphabet was difficult to learn.
It may exemplify that students who are used to learn characters (e.g. Japanese writing)
have difficulty in learning phonographs (the alphabet), which has much fewer symbols. Or
it may be attributed to a gender difference in perceptions (e.g. expectation) toward
handwriting. Unlike EFL learners, he demonstrated that contextual writing skills appear the
latest skills to appear for ESL learners. He has a positive attitude toward language learning
due to his needs and opportunities to use English. Finally, he reported on his efforts to
maintain his English skill in Japan:
When I was abroad, I paid more attention to the content and the manner of speech
(e.g. with humour, persuasively). Now, in Japan, I recognized myself that I pay
more attention to acoustic features in English (e.g. accents). I do not know why my
focus of attention has changed.
海外にいた時は「何を」話すかに自分で焦点を当てていたのに対し、今日本で英語を話すときは「どのように」
、
つまり自分のアクセントなどに気がいってしまっている自分に気づきました。根本的には話す内容こそが最も大
切であるはずなのになぜそういった別のところに意識が行ってしまったのかは分かりません。(Mr. Ta)
He discovered himself that, in an EFL environment, he is unconsciously paying more
attention to phonetic details of his English. This might suggest the Japanese culture that
English users in Japan value native-norm of English.
Another student described her experiences in ESL:
I like to communicate with people. Therefore, I enjoyed studying at an American
school. I knew nothing about English when I entered an American school in my
second year at elementary school. I think the language skill is affected by learners‟
attitudes, which may be similar to other subjects, but students‟ attitudes affect EFL
more than other subjects. I think it is important to begin communicating with
people rather than worrying about how to speak English.
私は話すのが好きなので、ISBであったのだと思います。そもそも話すのが好きなので、元々だと思います。
177
授業は最初まったく判らないです。ESLへ参加しました。ただ、私の印象としては、語学というのは好きと上
手いというのが相関していると思います。まー、ほかの科目もそうですが、嫌いでもできるということはあるじ
ゃないですか。でも、英語はそれが強いと思います。例えば、音声のことですが、繰り返しより、間違ってもい
いから、とにかく英語で話すということができればいいと思います。(Ms. To)
This student (13) attended ESL before she mixed with native speakers, whereas the British
school attended by student (12) accepted only students with native – norm English
competency. She enjoyed oral communication, which, she said, is in her nature. Then, she
said that communication skills and resilience in L2 learning might be a result of the
learners‟ personal character (i.e. their aptitudes). She is similar to the previous student and
had positive attitudes towards communicating with other people. The students (5) and (6)
are similar in the way that they communicate freely in the target language. However, their
salient skills are different, which might be attributed to their personalities or gender.
Summary
This section summarizes the students‟ best and worst skills and their attitudes and
opportunities in English study. Most students‟ English proficiency was upper-level, which
was confirmed by the results of a survey of the students‟ English learning history. Most of
them (nine students) had received private English lessons prior to beginning English in
school. Four students reported living abroad for longer than three years. Two of them
attended local schools from the early state of elementary school, while the two other
students lived in English native speaking countries before entry to elementary school.
Individual performances were widely spread. The transcripts are presented in Appendix 1.
We note that the symbol „L2-1‟ is used for the students who learned English before
students entered to junior high school. „L2-2‟ represents students who began learning
English at junior high school. In addition, the entire data of the interviews are incorporated.
Hereafter, the data analysis starts with listening skills. Let us summarize the findings of the
students‟ highest and least high skills before we discuss each in turn.
178
Summary of answers on Listening skills
As the onset of the study showed, six students identified listening as their best skill and
three identified it as their worst. One of the students (Male L2-1) said, “My listening skill is
the best because I heard a lot of English at Juku.” Similarly, the other male (L2-1, 5) said,
“I attended Juku for one year and listened to native speakers‟ on tape, which contributed to
my listening proficiency.” In addition, the other male (L2-1, 4) student said, “My scores for
reading and listening are higher than for speaking and writing skills.” The L1 male learner
(11) also said, “I think my listening skill is the most developed.”
On the other hand, the female student (L2-1, 2) said, “My speaking skill stands out, while I
am not good at listening and writing skills.” It may suggest that male students develop
fluency in listening faster than in speaking. For the opportunities, all of them learned
English at an early age. The opportunities for listening include attending English lessons
outside class or practice listening by self – study.
In sum, we conclude that 1) English study at young age had advantages for the
development of listening skills; 2) students without English environment developed
listening skills by practice; 3) language anxiety affected listening skills; 4) there may be
relations between gender and listening skills; 5) students who learned writing concurrently
with listening at young age developed better listening skill.
Summary of answers on Oral skills
Four students said that speaking was their best skill and seven said that it was their worst
skill. The attitudes about speaking include positive ones - “Communicative skills are
talents and I am good at it” (L2-1; 2). Similarly, a female student (L2–4) said, “My English
pronunciation was the best in my class. I was able to enjoy studying”. The other female
(L2-1; 6) also said, “I developed the oral skills from the experience.” Furthermore, the
other female L1 speaker said, “I enjoyed communicating with people.”
179
By contrast, a
male (L2-1; 5) said, “I did a lot of oral reading of the textbooks and store words into my
long-term memory”. The other male student (L2-1; 3) also noted, “I sometimes felt
embarrassed to speak in English.” Then, the other male student (L2-1; 9) pointed out, “The
oral skill is not included in proficiency tests (e.g. TOEIC) since it is difficult to examine.”
This illustrates that male students learned speaking by self–study, while female student
enjoyed communicating in English.
To summarize speaking skills, 1) English education at young ages had positive effects on
speaking. 2) Personal character would influence English communication. 3) Female
students had more positive attitudes to initiating conversations with L1 English speakers.
Sunderland, (1998:76 in Williams, Burden, and Lanbers; 2002:507) said that if girls speak
better, it is not from the innate superiority but because girls feel more comfortable in class.
Summary of answers on Writing skills
No student said that writing was their best skill and four said it was their worst. Attitudes to
writing include; a male student (L1-1; 2) “I did not have much experience in writing long
essays and writing was the most difficult.” Similarly, a female student (L2-1; 10) said, “We
can practice listening and reading skills alone whereas writing and oral skills requires
shared experiences and feedback.” So, the other female (L2-1; 2) student mentioned,
“Students seldom use writing skills to prepare for entrance examinations.”
Ultimately, taken together the present results suggested that 1) writing is the most difficult
skill to develop. (Writing skills here include lexical and syntactical accuracy as well as
fluency in creating or retelling the stories).
2) Learners need to create opportunities to
incorporate their ideas into writings. Interestingly, 3) Three male students struggled to
learn the alphabet at junior high school. It may suggest the need for teaching the alphabet
at primary school.
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Summary of answers on Reading skills
As for reading, four students said it was their best skill and one student said it was the
worst. The students‟ attitude towards reading was generally positive. By the way, the
students described prominent factors of reading difficulties as followings; „I struggled
with reading long stories (e.g. intensive reading) L2-1 (6) while L1 (10) mentioned his
fluency as “I enjoyed reading.” He talked about using reading for deliberate vocabulary
learning “I did systematic reading for memorizing vocabulary” (L2 -2; 8). That might
mean that reading is used at different levels for different purposes i.e. vocabulary learning,
enjoyment, or comprehensions. For opportunities of reading, two students used oral
reading. It seems to suggest that the four English proficiencies are linked each other to
build English competency. Finally, the list of students‟ comment is presented in appendix
1.
Summary of section:
This question asked the students‟ about their opportunities for English exposure and their
perceived communication competence. Taken together, the present result suggested that:
1) Female students have more positive attitudes toward using English than male students;
2) In terms of fluency, although it is in contradiction to Bailey et al. (1989), who said that
listening skill is the major concern for English learners, the students in this study
considered writing as the most difficult English skill. This may suggest that writing is the
final step of achievement in English study, as it requires both accuracy and fluency. 3)
Language education at a young age is beneficial to create positive attitudes to language
learning rather than to language competency. Bailey and Nunan, (1997:509) said that
motivation to language study might decrease with age. 4) Students without an English
milieu developed their English skills by self-study (i.e. oral reading). During the
181
interviews, the interviewees answered all questions from their own experience and the
data shall be a reliable compass for skill development.
In sum, with regard to the research questions posed pertaining to communicative skills,
the students‟ self-confidence in L2 communication was widely spread, which was
combined with communicative anxiety in English and its proficiency, which is explained
in detail in the next section.
The following section will look at how students learned the skills from the perspectives of
instruction, student – teacher relation, and the learning environment.
2 - j) How did the students acquire their English skills?
In recent years, the communicative approach has become popular in language learning. In
order to explore the practical classroom situation in this regard, the author asked students
about their learning experiences in a variety of physical and socio-cultural contexts. This
section aims to analyze the interview data to identify contributing factors to English
learning from the following three perspectives: 1) their instruction (e.g. types of input); 2)
their teacher-student interaction; and 3) their learning environment. The goal is to consider
the critical importance of social and affective factors in language acquisition.
For the data analysis, the participants were grouped according to their school environment;
1) district schools 2) schools in the capital, and 3) international school. Thematic analysis
was used to examine frequent factors in English language instruction, teacher-student
relations, and socio-cultural aspects of English learning. Now, the data analysis will start
by considering the learners‟ early experiences of English in district schools.
The first student (1) explained how he attained listening skills.
182
I began learning English at Juku when I was about to enter primary school. The
class had five to ten students and I attended this class for 12 years in total,
following my parents‟ wishes. We did not have textbooks for speaking with NETs,
whereas NNETs used textbooks for grammar instruction. At first, the NETs taught
us how to ask and answer questions. We learned about the sentence structure and
students used these English constructions to practice the transfer to other situations.
We sat summative tests every two months to check our progress. My listening skill
is the best among the four skills, but my speaking skill is still not satisfactory on
assessment tests. In my fifth and sixth grade at elementary school, I had NETs a
few times a year. I had a difficult time to learn the alphabet in the primary school.
Today, I use English mostly to read research papers.
小学校の頃だったと思います。塾に行き始めてきっかけです。12 年位です。主に英会話が多かったと思います。
あまり覚えていないのですが、両親の意思だったと思います。学問としてです。先生が英語で質問をしてそれで
答えることが多かったと思います。英会話クラスには教科書はなかったですけど、それと平行して文法のクラス
があってそれでは教科書を使っていました。
(NETS)小学校の頃から高校の時までずっと習っていました。文法
のほうの先生は日本人で、会話の方はカナダ人でした先生が一人いて、生徒が、そうですね、5 人から 10 人いて
それで会話をしていくということです。直接、聞くようなことを習っていて、わからないことがあったらその表
現を使って聞くようにしていました。はい。良くある質問とそれにはどうやって答えたらいいかを習っていて、
まー例えば、提携分にしたがって例えば自分の好きなものを答えてかいうやり方でした。基本的にはないのです
が、文法のテストを、時々、二ヶ月に一度ぐらいやっていて、どれだけ進んだかをやっていました。学校で英語
を習い始めた時期ですが、小学校 5、6 年生の頃、年に数回程度、簡単な英会話の練習があったように思います。
小学校の頃、アルファベットがなかなか覚えられなかったことか。そのくらいでしょうか。今は論文を読む時が
ほとんどです。(Mr.Su)
This acoustic engineering student (1) is from a small town, where people are rarely
exposed to English and live in a non - competitive academic environment. His parents
wished to give him an early English education. The main focus of Juku was speaking and
grammar. He developed successful listening skills through the monolingual method, but
lacks good speaking skills. He was clear about the roles of NETs and NNETs in his
learning. His set of English skills suits his needs for the university entrance exam and for
reading English-language research papers. He would therefore be a successful English
learner by the standards of his environment.
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Similarly, the next early learner (2) attended English class from kindergarten to high school
days.
My parents sent me to English conversation class at my kindergarten. The lessons
by a young NET were enjoyable in the familiar environment of my kindergarten
and my friends. We did not learn writing or reading skills, and the lesson was
similar to a L1 environment, without any apprehension. In my third or fourth grade
at elementary school, we had English lesson by NETs. The students were waiting
for their NET at the gym and we had oral lessons using flashcard or playing games,
without using writing and reading. At junior high school, I had EFL three times a
week, where NETs visited once a week. The rest of the lessons were by the NNETs.
The textbook called „Crown‟ had many pictures, songs, and poems, and most of
them were skipped. However, I learned my Basic English knowledge from the
textbooks. In senior high school, NETs visited the school once a month. Our school
focused on reading and writing skills for the university exam. I attended the same
English class until I was in the first year of high school. It was part of my routine.
EFL once a week is not enough to improve English skills in an EFL environment.
In my senior high school, we learned writing skills from the NETs by the direct
method and reading skills by the NNETs by the grammar translation method. From
this experience, I believe it is useful to use both the direct methods and the
grammar translation method at school.
親に英語塾に行かせてもらったということが(英語を初めてきっかけ)
。幼稚園の中の塾の中でやっていたので、
とくに街中でしゃべられているわけではないです。幼稚園なので日本語ですら、あまり読み書きできないので、
あまり読み書きといった内容ではなかったと思います。普通、幼稚園で日本語でやるようなことを英語でもして
見るような感じだったと思います。その時間多分楽しかったと思います。なぜかというと、その後、幼稚園を卒
業した後もその塾に自分から通ったこともあったので、わざわざしたのは楽しかったのだったからだったと思い
ます。英語の先生が怖いと感じたこともないです。多分、小学校―3-4 年ぐらいだったと思います。小学校の遊
戯の練習したりする広い部屋に集めてもらって、なんか、体育づわりかなにかで先生を来るのを待ってそこで活
動をしました。読んだり、書いたりするのではなくて、多分、先生がカードを持ってきて、活動しました。評価
184
されると、中学からです。えー、基本、英語は週三コマぐらいであったと思いますが、二週間に一度ぐらい NET
と一緒で、二週間は六コマですよね。六コマに一回の授業が NET といっしょで、後は日本人の先生が Crown の教
科書を使っていました。絵が多く、これを全部つめていったら Paper Book10ページにも満たないのではないか
なと思っていましたね。あと章と章の間に歌とか詩が載っていたと思いますが、そういうところは基本的に飛ば
していました。基本的に英語の知識を得るのには役に立ったと思います。NETの授業があったのですけど、受
験校だったので、月に一回ぐらいしかなかったと思います。文法中心です。英会話の塾には高校一年生まで行っ
ていましたが、途中に途切れた時はありましたが。好きというより、昔からやっていたので生活の一部になって
いました。はい、ずっと同じ学校に行っていました。自分の経験から言うと、あのー、昔からやっていても、さ
っき言ったように、週一回とか、途中でやめてしまうと、上手く行かないのであれば、EFL 環境で、ものすごく
たくさん小学校で英語に接ないと、多分そういうのに上手くならないと思うので、それだけたくさん英語の時間
があるならいいのですけど、今のように週三回くらいだったら中途半端に終わってしまうのできないのではない
かと思います。大学入試と関係させながら Native の先生でも出来ること、例えば自由英作文の書き方、レポート
の書き方みたいなことを、実際に先生が説明して、実勢に生徒に書かせるみたいなことをして、先生とのやり取
りは Native の先生がやる感じだったのですけど、それとはまた別に Reading の授業は NNETs が日本語を使いなが
らやっていたのです。で、あのー。複数あるこまの内、全部が Direct とか、全部が訳読ではなくて、うまく時間
として割り振りできれば共存できると思います。 (Mr. Se)
This English teacher and PhD student (2) is similar to the student (1) in that he learned
English from kindergarten by NETs before entering to school and continued until his entry
to senior high school. In kindergarten, he enjoyed learning from NETs. The difference
between this student and the previous student (1) is that his lesson focused only on
conversation and did not include wring skills. At elementary school, similar to other public
schools, NETs visited his school. However, from his experience, he said that it is difficult
to maintain the skills without English exposure. In high school, he attended Juku to prepare
for university exams and found that flexible use of both the direct methods and the
grammar translation method suited him well. Importantly, from his nearly 20 year long
English learning experience, he said that it is difficult to maintain communicative skills
without English exposure in daily life. He implied that infusing of communicative
approach into the grammar instruction was effective in his EFL situation. This is consistent
with the observation that “idiomacy” is best learned via target language cultural and
interpersonal experiences (Seidlhofer et al. 2006:3). This student said in the other part of
interview that he quit the lesson because a new NET began using Japanese language in
class, which he found unsuitable.
185
The next student (3) also learned English from age nine:
I started learning English from a Canadian teacher at Juku when I was nine to ten
years old. There were about 10 students in a class and nobody spoke Japanese, as if
there was a silent agreement. We did vocabulary games, reading books and
grammatical rules were explicitly learned by English composition without direct
translation. I do not have any good memory of EFL in junior high school. I felt
uncomfortable with NNETs because lessons were so boring. The textbooks were
filled with fictional dialogues, which are not useful in our everyday life. I felt
repugnance toward NNETs because they were over-confident. I accepted those
NNETs who could teach English for university exams and those who spoke English
in good pronunciation. Students with low English proficiency do not want to speak
in English. NNETs were intolerant of students‟ language mistakes. It is a small
mistake. I often hear students‟ complaints about the Japanese teachers who pointed
out the vocabulary mistakes of the students. It is not acceptable that teachers points
out such a small mistakes. Error correction is acceptable among friends. I learned
English and Chinese from native speakers by communicating with them. For
Japanese learners, the Chinese language might be easier because of our familiarity
with Chinese characters. Today, I am using English with my friends abroad in
internet chats. I presently do not take any English class.
九歳か十歳頃から塾に行きました。カナダ人でした。他の友達と遊んだりとか、日本語をしゃべってはいけない
とは言われませんでしたが、なんとなく雰囲気から、みな、英語を使うものと思っていました。10 人ぐらいでし
た。10 人ぐらいでした。grammar もやりましたし、ちょっとだけ本を読んだり。ゲームもしました。中学の方は
あまり、あのー、尐なくても私にとっては興味をわかせて様な英語の授業ではなかったです。その先生自体があ
まり英語が好きではなかったと思います。私は特に日本人の外国語の先生に嫌悪感を持っています。それは発音
が悪いかとかではなく、受験英語を教えている先生以外は、まず第一に英語の先生は自分のことに自信を持って
いる先生が多くて、それはいいことではあるかもしれないけど、すごくきれいな発音の先生だったらもちろんそ
れはかまわないのですけど。だから出来ない人が、がんばってしゃべろうと思わない。あの人をこういう単語が
どうのかとか、こんなことは小さい事ではないかと。それは友達同士の会話ではいいですけど、教える立場にあ
る人からそんな事を言われると.・・・.どうしてか判りませんが。友達と使うことが多いです。そう考えると、私に
186
英語を教えてくれたのは、中国語でも英語でもほとんど NET の方がほとんどなんですね。どの言語もそれぞれに
違った難しさがあるので、単純に英語が難しいとか言えません。ただ日本人に対して読み書きでいえば、漢字を
知っているのでその意味では簡単ですが、英語は新しい言葉だから、ちょっと難しそうに見えるかなと思います。
仲良しのお友だちと英語でチャットをしたりします。それはかいたり、聞いたりしゃべったり、いろいろ勉強に
なります. 英語の授業はいま受けていません。(Ms. Ku)
This acoustic engineering PhD student (3) is different from the previous students (1, 2) in
that she learned oral, reading, and writing skills concurrently in a monolingual
environment. She raised several new issues about teacher-learner relations. She does not
accept being corrected by NNETs in front of her peers. She sees them as arrogant and
thinks that they place too high importance on details. Their behaviour de-motivated her and
her fellow students. However, she is different from the previous student in that she
successfully developed oral skills outside classrooms by socializing opportunities outside
of class. Her opinions reflect a lack of authority of NNETs in Japan resulting from their
perceived lack of subject skills.
The next early starter (4) spoke about his admiration for America:
I started learning English when I was in third grade of elementary school. I admired
America at that time. I had asked my mother to attend English conversation classes,
and began studying English. The class was located on the top of a mountain and the
teacher was married to a foreigner. She gave nicknames to students. About eighty
percent of the lesson was in English. We used CDs for listening and used textbooks
for reading and speaking. I attended the same class once a week with four students
in a class. I attended it from the third grade to the first grade in senior high school.
NETs visited school for two weeks and the students practiced the expressions with
games with other students and reviewed the grammar. NNETs stayed in the back of
class to help students. I liked to study English, but I do not recall any pleasant
memory at EFL in school. I dropped out of high school in my second year and
prepared for university by myself by rote memorizing. For example, I looked for
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important vocabulary in the textbooks and memorized those words. My English
improved a lot when I was preparing for the university and I feel that university
examination is a useful opportunity to study English.
小学校三年生の時です。その当時、アメリカとか格好いいなと思って、母に英会話スクールに通いたいと言って、
行きました。えーと、同じ三年生位の男の子、小学生の違う学年の生徒もいたんですけど、一緒くたになって、
先生が一人一人に英語のあだ名をつけられて、夫が外国の方で、どこの国か忘れてしまったんですけど、その方
が教科書を使って、復唱したり、例文を読ませたり、その例文を使いながら会話させたり、あと英語でミニゲー
ムをやったり、あとそうですねそういった形の授業を週一回ぐらい、えーと、一時間半ぐらいでしたかね。ほと
んど英語だった。八割ぐらい英語でしたかね。一対 4 ぐらいでした。三年生から高校一年生の春ぐらいまで。あ
まり、なんだろ、途中でも、面倒だと思ったこともありましたが、そこまで苦ではなかったです。中学三年間の
中で二人の NETs が二週間位、この間この学校にいます。という感じでおりました。そばについている先生が必ず
いました。元からいる英語の先生と外国人の Native の方がお二人授業をする、それでその先生と外国人の先生が
お二人で授業をすると、それで主にはその外国人の方が授業を進め、NNT が助け舟を出すという感じで授業が進
んだと思います。英語は英語が好きで、英語のクラスで, あんまり、すごくわくわくしたとか、たのしかったとか、
強烈な、鮮明な記憶が沸いてこないです。自分で、家で、繰り返し、繰り返し、同じものをやったのですけど。
そうですね。僕のやったのは、文章の中に覚えるべき単語を、読んで、意味何かなーて思って、次のページに答
えが書いてあるので、それをみて、あーそうなんだと思って、文章の意味を入れてひたすら覚えました。僕は高
校一年で高校をやめているので、そうですね。僕は高校一年までは学校へ行ってたのですけど、二年三年といっ
ていないので、普通の生徒とはちょっと違うのですけど。それで、塾とか自分で本で勉強したのですが。一番覚
えたのはやっぱり単語帳でした。(Mr. Na)
This student studying at a private university was initially motivated to study English by his
admiration for America. Throughout the interview, he was reticent and polite. In line with
the aforementioned students, he attended English class earlier than starting English at
junior high school. His English study at Juku is different from the previous students (1, 2,
3) in that he learned English by a NNET focusing on reviewing English classes at school
with occasional use of retelling stories by using aural or pictorial stimuli. It appears that he
had a good relationship with the teacher at Juku. In contrast, he dropped out of high school
in the first year. In Japan, the dropout rate is very low and the author did not ask his reason
for leaving his high school. His opportunity to advance to university therefore depended on
self-study, which was by memorizing. He said in another part of the interview that setting
goals is important for his life.
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The next student portrayed difficulties of acquiring linguistic competence at school.
I started attending an English conversation class from fifth grade of elementary
school and, since my family moved to another city, I learned English for five years
at two schools. I enjoyed NETs‟ lesson more because they created more enjoyable
atmosphere and because of their good pronunciation. It was good to see foreigners
at Juku with lack of English milieus outside school. I made this decision by myself.
I began learning English as academic subject from junior high school. At school,
lexical items that I learned at schools were not enough to prepare for the entrance
examination. I learned a lot of vocabulary by self-study. It took two years to get
into the university after high school graduation.
小学校の亓年生の時、英会話学校へ行っていました。先生は、その英会話教室には 3 年間行っていたのですが、
転勤したので、その後の英会話教室には 2 年ぐらい行ってました。NETs の人との NNETs と人は半々位でした。
時期によって違ったという事です。やっぱり、NET の先生の方が、楽しかったと思います。 楽しかったし、まー、
発音がいいので良かったと思います。まわり外国人がほとんどいなかったので、その Native の人と話できること
自体が良かったと思います。自分の意思でした。学校の授業としては中学校からです。当時はなんとも思ってい
ませんでしたが、いま中学校の教科書をみると、よくこれだけしか勉強しなかったと思います。高校だと Vocabulary
は多尐増えるんですけど、はっぱり、教科書に載っているものだけだと、大変だという感じはありますね。大学
受験をした時も、今も Vocabulary は人より尐ないと思いますけど、やはり自分で覚えたりとか。私は二浪したの
ですが。(Mr. Ka)
This engineering senior student (5) changed his school five times in Japan due to his
parents‟ moves. Firstly, after attending five Japanese public schools, he recognized a
variety of accents used in Japanese language and learned code-switching to accommodate a
new culture. This motivated him to study acoustic engineering to analyze Japanese accents
spoken by foreigners. Secondly, he said that NETs English class was enjoyable. As a result,
students are exposed to a different culture. Thirdly, he is similar to the previous student (4)
in that he relied on self-study to enter to the university. He used positive words (e.g.
enjoyable), which may suggest his positive attitudes toward ES as well as other people.
All of the students who studied outside Tokyo attended English Juku before studying
English at school. It may suggest that English has gained importance for Japanese students.
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Academically, English is a sine-qua-non to advance to higher education for them.
The next students studied at private schools.
The next student (6) addressed a number of issues but at the end, he spoke about peer
pressure.
My motivation to study English had been for university entrance exams. Now, I got
a job offer from a trading company and I wish to have communicative competence
in English. I started learning English at Junior High School. I had no
English-speaking neighbours near my house. I do not recall any enjoyable
experiences of my English lessons… Except that, I was excited to see a teacher
checking our English essays. I took a correspondence course in my Junior High
School days to prepare for the entrance examination. I attended Juku during my
Senior High School days. The focus of my English study has been reading skills.
We had conversation classes by NETs who understood some Japanese. The goal of
English study was passing the university exam and for this goal, reading skills
come first, and then writing and listening. I always felt that I want to achieve as
well as my classmates did.
昔はやはり受験でした。今は商社に来年から入ることになったのではやり英語は絶対必要だと。やっぱり僕自身国
際的にがんばって、外人ともうまくビジネスしていきたいと思うので、そういった仕事の為といった Motivation
です。中学校です。(Juku)行かなかったですね。全くの日本人に囲まれました。授業で英語が楽しかったなとい
うことはほとんどなかったですが、あー。でも楽しかったのは英作文の時間に、やっぱり自分で英作文を作って、
先生に添削しているその瞬間は、結構楽しかったと思います。塾は、そうですね、受験勉強という意味で、駿台予
備校などへ受験勉強に行きました。はい、もう高校生で。あー、中学校のときは Z 会の勉強はしていました。 通
信教育なので、テキストが送られてきて文法を中心でやはりリーディングに重きをやるやり方です。やっぱりどち
らかと言うと Reading へ重きをおいた勉強―、ずっと。たまに Conversation という時間がありましたが、そこでは
Native の先生がいましたが、基本的には日本人の先生がやりました。日本の先生が主導で、やっぱり日本語で説明
していきました。僕にとってはやはり、受験と言うのがまずは英語科目だったので、やはり受験はあまり Listening
がないですし、ただまず第一に Reading があって。その次に Writing があって、Listening があって、それで Speaking
はほとんどなかったですね。やはり勉強する時、一番大切なのはやる気だなっーと思っていて、例えば大学に合格
したりですとか、あいつには負けたくないという気持ちも僕には結構強くて. (Mr. Ot)
This student (6) had experience living in the U.K. at an early age and then he entered a
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private integrated school in Japan. Similar to other students (7, 9), he had little memory of
his life in England. Secondly, he said that he did not enjoy English study. He did not give
any reasons for this, such as students‟ anxiety, or NNTs‟ lack of efforts to create
comfortable atmosphere as NETs have been seen to do. Lastly, and interestingly, a peer
pressure was a strong motivator for him in Senior High School. It may suggest that one of
the significant de/motivating factors is the learning environment. It may also imply that
motivating factors are student-owned.
The next student (7) described de/motivation factors at school.
My parents were eager for me to learn English and I attended English Juku since
the fourth grade at primary school. Syntactic rules were implicit in the taught
material and the learning at primary school was good in teaching grammar rules.
The students were from affluent families and many friends at school attended
English Juku. Textbooks named „Progress‟ were used in my school and they are
very useful. The textbooks were written by a foreign missionary and this advanced
series of textbooks is used by a number of private schools. We had LL class once a
week by the NETs. During my senior high school days, I attended Juku and learned
„discourse grammar‟, which was very useful for understanding the story and
summarizing the context for the university exams. I like teachers who have the skill
of teaching grammar rules well, teach briskly, and have immediacy. At the
university, I took reading and listening classes in the first two years. Then in the
third year, I attended a discussion class with exchange students. I have seen many
students with English proficiency at the university and I began to feel that my
English skill is not as good as I had believed. Consequently, my self-efficacy has
dropped. I wish I could maintain my self-esteem and that my achievement could be
better than it is today.
勉強を始めたのは、私は小学校が私立の小学校で英語教育を小学校一年生から取り入れている学校だったんですね。
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文法を文法として教えられた経験は小学校ではなくて、例えばこれは This is a pen と読むんですよという形では習
っていても、単数を is で使って、複数では Are と使うことはなかったので、体感をされるという感じでした。小学
校の英語の勉強としてはそれで良かったと思います。まー、Audio を使ってもいいと思います。あと両親は英語を
一生懸命させよう家だったので、小学校の時は英語の塾に通っていて。(教科書) 役にたったと思います。Progress
English という、あのー、大阪かなにかの、あのー、神父様が作った教科書があって、よく私立の中高一貫の学校
で使われているのですが。はい、チョッとまー、進度の速い教科書ですが、それを多くの学校が使っていますが、
うちもそれを取り入れていて普通に授業がありました。私立でチョッと裕福だったこともあって、英語の学校へ通
っていた人が周りにもたくさんいましたし、あと私は大学受験のために予備校へ行っていたのですね。高校三年間
の間、それでその予備校で習った先生が気に入った先生がいて、その方も外大出身なんですけど。英語も、文法だ
けではなく、文法も大切ですが、談話文法というのを,なにが大事でとか、何が要旨で、ここが例をあげていると
か、テーマを上げてそれをどう展開していくかなど、文の読み方を教えてくれる先生で、それが面白かったですし、
大学入試にも良く役に立ったですね。その先生が、まー、今まで習った先生の中で自分的に一番好きな先生です。
そうですね、良かった先生は、学校ではすごく判りやすく文法を説明してくれる先生がよかったと思います。後半
ぐらいになると塾のほうを一生懸命やっていて学校の授業を余りやっていなかったということもありますね。
( University) 一年生、二年生、三年生の前半まではとっていました。一二年の時は Reading のするような授業と
Listening の授業を取る様にしていました。私は大学に入った後に、やはり周りの子が英語も出来るし、自分が思
ったり出来ないということに気づいて、まー英語に限らずレベルの高い人が多かった大学だったので、思ったより
自分が出来ないということが判って、ちょっと自信をなくしてしまったり、いろいろ行動力を落ちてしまって、ま
ー、大学には楽しく通ったのですけど、まーそこでそうやって自信を失わないで、努力をし続けられていたら、英
語力なんかももっと上がっていけたと思うんでけど、入試のレベルにもさらに上乗せしてあがっていけたと思うの
ですけど、ちょっとそこで、やる気がおちて、すこし、落ちた感があるので、すこし落ちた感があるので。そこで
自信を失わないで、そのまま進んでいけたら、英語の面だけではなくて、いろいろな面で、今より上がっていたの
ではないかと思います。 (Ms. Za)
This enthusiastic student (7) studies Arabic at a university specializing in foreign languages.
Due to her parents‟ wishes to give her an early English education, she attended a private
primary school and learned English from both NETs and NNETs. A natural approach was
used, such as retelling or using the story as fluent as possible without grammatical
explanation. Secondly, she pointed out that the school textbook was motivating. Thirdly,
she agreed with the students (4, 5) in that the teachers at the Juku had effective teaching
skills, which met their needs in the university exams. Fourthly and finally, in contrast to the
previous student (6), she was de-motivated to study English after seeing returnees at her
university. These had a higher English proficiency than herself. Although she was
extroverted, she realized that her L2 English was different from that of the returnees. The
other students‟ superior English proficiency affected her motivation. For this student, the
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de-motivating factor is not learner-owned.
The next student (8) spoke similarly about his school textbooks;
My school used textbooks named “Progress”. I learned English by memorizing
these textbooks. At home, I did oral reading and studied vocabulary. My school and
a Canadian school had an exchange program. As a result, a Canadian student stayed
in my house. He had studied Japanese language and we talked in Japanese. When I
visited Canada for a school excursion, I was able to help other students in English.
All students have to stay at Canadian families, and I helped students as an
interpreter. In the third year, “Progress” was replaced by “New Horizon” and they
were much easier. After school, I attended Juku from the first year of junior high
school until the end of senior high school. Juku focused on reading skills. For
listening skills, ten- minutes - listening stories were used followed by
comprehension quizzes or close tests to ask about the content. I practiced dictation
a lot to prepare for university exams including oral reading… Indeed, I am good at
mimicking people. At school, when I saw a person, I could understand their
expression and I mimicked them on the spot. English pronunciation is similar with
this. It means that learners copy native speakers‟ English pronunciation. I was
influenced a lot by my English teacher in the second year at junior high school.
After senior high school, I have not had such an experience. Nevertheless, the
Japanese English teacher had such a good English pronunciation and I admired him
a lot. It is my self-effort, which moves me forward. I must work alone to continue
my research.
私たちが使っていた教科書は progress というのだったんですけど、それの book1と book 2 をやったのですよ。
それで中学2年の時に。全員の方がやっているはずなんです。だけでも、それだけで足りなくて、まー、足りな
いと思って、自分で本屋に行って、単語帳を買って、そこで自分で覚えていったのです。それでテストに出る順
みたいに、簡単な単語から段々難しい単語にして行く様に、単語帳はやりましたね。カナダの学校と交流してい
たのですが、私の学校が。そこでホームステーがあたったのですが、私の家にもひとりカナダの学生さんが私の
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うちにもやってきたのですよ。それでとまりに来て、彼も結構日本の教育を受けていたので会話も結構できまし
た。それで修学旅行もカナダに行った時も、私は英語が好きだったので、それに良くできたので、みんなのため
に翻訳をやることになったんですよ。みなカナダ人の家庭に入れられてしまうので、
「斉藤、ちょっと来い。
」と
いうわけで。高校生の頃に私がやっていたのが、New Horizon と Mile Stone だったのです。中学二年までは Progress
だったんですけど。それで三年から New Horizon になって、これはすごく簡単な教科書だったのです。だから学校
でできるものは全部予習してしまって、あとは塾で大学入試に備えるということです。Juku での学習方法は、文
法単元ごとに、今月は接続詞のみだけとか、現在完了形だとか、まず文法的なことをやって、長文も良くやりま
した。
たとえば10分間ぐらいのストーリーを聞いて、穴埋め問題とかここで何を言っているかとか、あと Dictation
をよくやりましたね。受験用の塾でした。私は教科書をよく音読をしていたのですよ。対忚できたから、だから
教科書を音読すればかなり出来るかなーって思いました。あー。自分はなぜ英語が得意になったかと言うと、物
まねが得意と言うこともあるかもしれない。高校の時は先生の授業の真似をして人を笑わせたりとか、やはりお
んなじだと思うのですよ。やっぱり中学二年生の時に会った英語の先生のお陰です。やはり、学業面では、中学
高校に限れば先生と自分の努力、それ以後は先生からの感化と言うのはほとんどないです。自分で研究していか
なければ行けないので。(NNET) 発音のいい先生だったので、すごくそれにあこがれてできたということもあった
のですね。(Mr. Sa)
The student (8) agreed with the preceding student (7) in describing a number of factors,
which are seen as motivating or effective to achieve their English skills. The motivating
factors they found are; 1) early start of English study, 2) useful and challenging textbooks,
3) good teacher-student relations, 4) repetitive oral reading, and 5) autonomy of study. This
student admired a teacher with good pronunciation, whereas the previous student admired
a teacher with good grammatical knowledge. It may suggest that grammar and
pronunciation might be the most de-motivating factors (i.e. difficult) for Japanese student.
In addition, he is similar to the previous student (7) in that their parents were eager to
promote an international environment for them.
The next student (9) also learned at a private school in Tokyo.
After returning to Japan in the first year of primary school, I attended Berlitz
School until I was in the third year of elementary school. Then I stopped attending
English class when I began preparing for entrance examinations to junior high
schools. NETs visited the primary school once in two weeks and we played English
games or watched videos about the NETs‟ home country. I entered a private
integrated junior and senior high school that valued English education by inviting
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NETs. When I was in senior high school, I visited America for a home stay of three
weeks. Then, I attended Juku to prepare for the entrance examinations to the
university. I attended Juku in senior high school because I had good results in
achievement tests. I enjoyed studying English for the entrance exams, and I spent a
lot of time at it. Teachers at Juku were skilful at preparing for the university
examinations, and I trusted the teachers at Juku rather „liked them‟ and followed
their instruction to get into higher education. I trusted the teachers who had good
English pronunciation and I preferred lessons by NETs.
小学校の一年生に相当する時だけ、日本語の日本人の学校に週一回行っていました。小学校の時は英語はなかっ
たんですけど、個人的に英語を忘れないように親が忘れないようにかえってすぐからベルリッツに、はっきり何
年か覚えていませんけど何年か通っていて、多分、中学受験が始まって、英語どころではなくなったので、しば
らくお休みしていて、中学校からは学校で英語の授業を受け始めました。中学高校は、教育としてはそれだけで、
学校は通っていないです。高校一年生の時にアメリカにホームステーに行く事があって、3週間ほど行っていた
のですけど、その、前くらいの時に、留学機関がやっている定期的レッスンに行ったことがあります。小学校高
学年ぐらいまでは、ほとんど英語には触れていない、ベルリッツに行っていたのは小学校 3 年ぐらいまで、前半
なので、高学年は英語に全く触れていないです。そういえばあった記憶がありますね。そういえば小学校の時に
アメリカとカナダの先生が一週間に一回ぐらい、週一はなかったですね。二週間に一回ぐらい、英語のゲームを
しましょうとか、当時の現地の生活の Video を見たりして、現地の生活に触れてみましょうとか、そういったもの
がありましたね。高校の時から塾に行っていたので、その時は科目としての対策というのを受けていました。私
は、英語は得点元だったので、英語の受験の勉強はするのは好きでした。塾の先生は受験英語のプロという意味
で、信頼はしていて、その先生がしますプログラム、というか問題をこなしていけば問題ないんじゃないかと信
用していて、あと、学校のほうの英語は、一忚わたしの通っていた学校は中高一貫だったんですけど、英語には
力を入れていて、学校の英語が全く意味がないと思っていなくて、その、それぞれ保管しあう部分があって、学
校の英語の受験という意味では細かい文法だったりするところをやっていたので、受験に役立つし。大学の二年
の夏に、オーストラリアの語学学校に三週間行っているですね。私は発音というものを自分で意識というか、発
音を判断基準としてみていたので、日本人の先生が発音が上手じゃないと、あまり信用していなかったというか、
そういう意味では,Native の先生を好んでいました。(Ms. Hi)
Firstly, this student (9) majoring in pharmaceutics is similar to the student (6) in that her
lexical and syntactic knowledge of English at her young days did not remain. Secondly, she
and the students (7, 8) are similar in that their parents provided them with an
English-speaking environment. However, as a consequence, unlike the previous students (7,
8), she did not choose to study English in higher education. She, as others, admired
teachers with good pronunciation. For them, the level of English is established by the
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quality of pronunciation.
In contrast, the next student (10) learned English for the first time at school.
At the beginning in junior high school, I was not good at English. For instance, I
wondered why the third person uses “does” and the first person uses “do”. It is just
a rule, but I could not understand it. I felt it was not good to continue in this way.
Then, I asked my mother to look for an English class and I entered Juku. Our
NNET from Hokkaido learned English at a church. After I started learning English
at Juku, I enjoyed learning English. I received a lot of praise for my good English
pronunciation. I was always the best student in the class. Only few students
attended Juku in my school. Since my second year at junior high school, I had
perfect scores on English tests. I did not work so hard to memorize textbooks. I
read the textbooks many times, and prepared for next lessons as well. Before the
examination, I reviewed again. NETs had too many students at school, and it was
quite boring to speak English with classmates. However, at Juku, I learned in a
small group taught by NETs. I owe a lot to my parents. My parents always gave me
praise. I felt that my mother brought me up with praise. Recently, my self-efficacy
is affected by many highly capable students in my university.
最初はとても苦手だったんですね。なぜ He のときは Does でなぜ、You の時は Do なのかとか、どうして違うの
かとそういうことがわかなくって、ずーと、そういう言葉だからそういうものだと思えばいいのですが、なぜか
と思ったのです。それでそのままじゃだめだと思って、英語を勉強したいといって母が探してくれて、その先生
は北海道出身の方ですが、その当時、修道会に通って英語を覚えて後言うことです。そうですね、やはり、塾と
併用して、読めるようになってきたり、あのー、発音がきれいだと言われるようになってきたり、あと、クラス
で一番できるようになってきたあたりから、自信の源という感じでした。はい、毎回大体、満点みたいな感じで
した。中学二年生ぐらいからでした。あとまず、苦手意識が強くかったので、ドンドン嫌いになって、またドン
ドン嫌いになっていったと思いますね。それは、それは教わったことを完璧にしたことだと思いましたテストは
すべて教科書を確認することでしたので、教科書を確認すれば教科書は出来るわけですので、それをなんども訳
して、また訳しなおすと行くことをやって、覚えてしまったことで、出来たのではないかと思います。そんなに
がんばって暗記したと言う記憶はないのですが、結構すらすらと暗記できたのですけど、そうですね。でも復習
を何度もやったと言うことだと思います。まず予習をして、授業に望んで、そこでまた聞いて、また復習して、
また試験前また復習してと繰り返してやったことだと思います。Nativeからでも一対Massでやるのは
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あまり意味がないなーと感じました。それは両親にいつも褒められて育ったというのはあると思います。いろい
ろ学業以外にもいろいろな意味で成功するとすごく褒められましたし、あと成功しなくてもかわいがられて、い
つも評価されるというか。あと、うまくいかなくてもいつも肯定されながら育ったというのは良かったと思いま
す。東大に入ってから、もっと、断然に優秀な人とか、断然に大きな夢を達成している人を見るとそういうのに
くらべて、全然自分なんかだめだなという思いをすることが中高に比べて多くなったと思います。 (Ms. Ho)
This student (10) majors in international law. Firstly, she spoke about the difficulty of
English grammar. Secondly, she agreed with the student (7) that she made an autonomous
decision to study English. Thirdly, she is similar to the student (7, 8) in that she described
the importance of reviewing the lessons. Finally, she is unique in showing how praise
works positively for the students‟ efficacy and the resultant progress afterward. She
mentions her parents‟ positive feedback on her academic success. Finally, after seeing
many returnees with better English proficiency, she realized the difference in the quality of
L1 and L2 speakers. Her story continues in another part of interview.
The next student (11) spoke about her experience at her Catholic school:
In my catholic school, I had English lessons three to four times a week and English
conversation classes took place twice a week. The nun teachers were fluent in
Japanese but they did not use Japanese. The class size was about 20 students for a
teacher in a class. The goal of the school was to develop reading and writing skills
and we had little time for oral skills. I liked one teacher who prepared handouts for
grammar rules that were helpful. It could be more to her personality that I was
attracted to. Her English pronunciation was very clear. We learned from a NET
once a week. The teachers at school were very strict, but they gave students a lot of
praise. My parents also praised me a lot and my self-efficacy would be higher than
the reality justifies. If there is a need to use English, we study well. However, today
in Japan, we can live comfortably without the English language and forget what we
had learned at school.
学校は英語の授業は週に3回か4回ぐらいありました。あと週に二回英会話の時間がありました。カトリックの
学校だったのでシスターが英会話を教えていました。日本語はぺらぺらでした。英語しか使いませんでした。英
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会話というより、教科書に沿って教科書の内容について、絵とかをみて質問すると行く形でした。1 対 20 ぐらい
です。高校も本当に読み書きばかりで、だから英語の論文は普通に読めるのですが、しゃべるのは本当に苦手で
「もっとしゃべる時間を作ってほしかったな。」と思います。NET は週に一回ぐらいです。中学の時の英語の先生
で、日本人の先生でしたけど、とても判りやすく教科書の内容を説明してくれてプリントにして書き直してくれ
て、文法はとてもよく判りました。スタンダードなスタイルでした。その先生のおかげで。先生の性格が好きだ
ったのかなー。でもとても判りやすかったです。そのお手製のプリント。先生自身もタイで生活をしたことがあ
って、日本人の先生でしたけど、発音もとても良かったです。NET は週に一回ぐらいです。厳しかったですね。
それが必ず成績に反映されあたし、女の先生でした。厳しかったけど良く出来ると褒めてくれる方でした。多分、
両親が叱らないでほめて育ててくれるタイプだったので、なんというか、自信が、中身が伴っていないのに、出
きるという力がほとばしっている気がします。
(環境は影響すると)思いますが。どうしても必然的に英語を使わ
なくてはいけないという状況になるとやると思いますけど、いまは日本語だけで生きていけるから、英語も中高
で習ったことを忘れてしまいます。(Ms. No)
This student (11) attended an integrated junior and senior high school. Similarly, to the
student (8), she appears to have a good teacher-student relation with NNETs at school
owing to their positive feedback to her. She appreciated NNETs‟ good pronunciation and
their handouts on details of the grammar. Lastly, this cheerful student was similar to the
student (10) as they have received positive feedback from parents and teachers, which was
expressed in their smile. This shows how teachers‟ personality turned out to be a strong
motivator for their students.
The next student (12) spoke about motivation in a similar way.
At school, I had NETs for English conversation lessons. They understood some
Japanese, but did not use it. I took summer courses at Juku and learned from NETs.
I attended a preparatory school, which focussed on grammar for writing and
reading skills. The lesson started with five basic sentence patterns with basic lexical
knowledge such as “I, MY ME MINE”. I used vocabulary notes to memorize. At the
university, we had several English courses but I avoided all courses conducted in
English. I do not recall any exciting nor painful memory in English classes. I have
not used English at all in my life. I begin to feel that I need to study English now.
夏期講習とかそういうのを受けた時は NET でした。 学校は会話時間に NET がありました。日本人の先生がつい
ていました。片言ができました。 駿台予備校へ行ったので、そこでの予備校の教科書が主だったんです。それは、
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一般の教科書のように会話から始まるのではなくて、いきなり文法から始めました。I my me.とか。亓文型は最初
にやりました。文法中心でした。普通の読み書き中心でした。30 人ぐらい。まー解説はしてました。先生の言葉
で教科書を解説をするという典型的なものでした。はい、日本人でした。夏期講習とかそういうのを受けた時は
NET でした。学校は会話時間に NET がありました。日本人の先生がついていました。辛いというより)という
より、自然に習得できなかったので、英語はひたすら単語帳を覚えて済ませてしまいました。英語の
授業はたまにあった事はありました。四年の夏休みで終わりました。そういう授業はありましたが、全て避けま
した。なんかその、特に楽しいとか悲しいとか言うはなかったです。いまでも英語は全くふれていないので、そ
ろそろ積極的にふれないといけないかなーと思っていますが。というレベルなのです。(Mr. Ha)
This acoustic engineering student (12) has not travelled abroad and his achievement solely
depended on his self-efforts. In contrast to the previous students (10, 11), he seemed to lack
interaction with teachers in class. At school and in Juku, he had teacher-centred instruction
in a competitive environment of preparation for the university exam. This teacher-centred
exam preparation ignores other needs of the students. Indeed, after entering the university,
the student (12) developed an intrinsic motivation to use English, but found himself
insufficiently prepared.
The aforementioned seven students in the second group studied at private schools.
Lastly, the students in the third group have received education abroad. The first student
(13) described how she learned at an international school abroad:
I attended ESL at an American School for one year and a few months. Every
non-native- English learner is required to attend ESL. While we studied English at
ESL, native English speaking students studied L1 English or took sociology classes.
All students studied together for subjects such as mathematics, science, music, or
art. At the beginning of every academic year, the school conducts a proficiency test
of English for ESL students. Then the school asked the students who achieved a
pass-mark whether they were comfortable to leave ESL. I spoke to the teacher that
I want to leave ESL in the middle of the third grade and managed to leave ESL then.
The students who stayed in ESL longer tended to spend more time with Japanese
friends rather than mix with English speakers. I like to communicate with people.
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Therefore, I did not have any problem to learn at the International School. I did not
experience any language problem since my third or fourth year at elementary
school. After returning to Japan in the middle of my fifth grade, I attend a public
elementary school for two years and the school did not have English lesson. I
attended English lesson for returnee students to keep their English skills. We read
English books or discussed about the topic chosen by the NETs from the U.K. or
the U.S.A. Teachers did not speak Japanese at all in class. The class had about 15 to
20 students. I stopped attending this class in sixth grade. Then, I entered a private
junior school in Japan and studied French with seven to ten returnees every day.
NETs and NNETs taught us three times a week. I also had English lessons once a
week. Then, I advanced to a public senior high school in Sydney. I also studied
French there. I have studied French for ten years in total and have affection to
French culture. My level of French proficiency is B2 level in the DELF scale. It
became part of my identity that I can speak three languages. In addition, I enjoy
communicating with other people and this is my nature.
ISB はまず入ると何も判らないので、ESL へ入って行くのですよ。ESL はどの授業に変わっていくかというのが決
まっていて、Writing とか、国語の授業とか、社会のところを多分抜いて、そこの授業の時に先生が迎えに来るん
ですよ。
「ESL の子は来なさい。
」って。でも理科とか算数とかあまり関係ない、語学に。ですから、Art とか Music
は全部でている。私は早く出たいていたいといって、小学校の二年生はちょいちょいぬかれていたのですけど、
3年生の半ばぐらいからいっさい出なかったです。なかなか上がれない人がいましたが、その人は日本人の人と
一緒にいることが多かったと思います。学年のはじめに、大丈夫かなという、Follow Up Test があって、簡単なテ
ストでチェックされるんです。卒業みたいな感じです。三年生の後半から四年生は大丈夫でした。私は話すのが
好きなので、ISBであったのだと思います。日本の学校は亓年生の半ばから六年生までです。総合の授業は入
っていましたけど、総合の授業のリキュラムを学校が自由に決められるので、英語の授業はなかった。帰国子女
財団がやっている英語の力を維持する為に英語保持教室というのがあってそこに週一回通いました。本を読んで
みたりだとか、あと先生がテーマを決めてそれをやったり、学期前に変わったのですが、最初はアメリカ人で次
がイギリス人でした。まったく話せないです。対 15-20 人ぐらいです。できないです。あ、判ったかもしれない
けど、日本語を、授業では一切使わなかったので、先生が日本語がどのくらい判るか判らなかったです。小学校
六年生でそこもやめました。帰国者が 7-10 人ぐらいいたので。英語圏からの帰国した人は大体フランス語を取
るんですね。それで、何かをやろうという時に、みんなで英語で映画を見ようとか、文章をちょっと読もうとか、
先生が文章をもってきて読んだり、新聞を読んだり、海外の思い出話をしたりした。高校はシドニーの現地校へ
通っているんですね中学三年間ずっとフランス語ですね。フランス語選択者は、英語の授業が週一回入りのです。
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週 5 回フランス語があって、週二回は NET で週三回は NNET でした。Delf というフランス語の教育相にやってい
るフランス語の検定試験をうけて、B2までいっています。英語以外の語学ができることが advantage を感じてま
すね。それ以外にできるということは大事な意味があると思います。私は話すのが好きなので、ISBであった
のだと思います。そもそも話すのが好きなので、元々だと思います。(Ms. To)
This self-claimed extroverted student (13) spoke clearly and fast during the interview. She
was able to integrate with native speakers when she was about nine to ten-year old. By the
beginning of puberty, she felt comfortable in English and took up a second language. Her
extroverted personality helped her to develop her English skills by interacting with
students of different cultural backgrounds. She observed differences in ESL achievement
among her peers and attributes them to their social habits. She is highly aware and
observant in her peer group and is in control of her environment.
The next student (14) had a similar experience in the UK:
Six months before we moved to the U.K., I attended an English class near my train
station once a week. We learned very simple English expressions – for example,
“This is a pen.” or “What is your name?” from a Canadian teacher by playing
games with flash cards or listening to music. When I first arrived in the UK, I did
not use these phrases. Nevertheless, it was enjoyable to learn English with my
friends there. I entered a state school in the UK, and had a supervisor attending me
every day. I was told that he would help me solve academic problems, if any, for six
months. In addition to this supervisor system, I attended a private tutorial outside
the school once a week. I learned English grammar and English comprehension
there after school. By the end of grade six, I was doing well. I was able to learn
English in a natural way because it was necessary for me to use English in my life.
For instance, when I arrived in the UK, I wanted friends to play with. Then, I
thought that, if I can rattle English on gaily, I could make friends.
イギリスに行く前に転勤が決まってから海外に行くまで半年ぐらいの時間がありましたが、その間に駅前の英会
話スクールがあって、そこに通い、簡単な単語のようなものを本当に簡単なことを習ったんですけど、いざ現地
に行ってみるとそんなこと、
「This is a pen.」といってことは余り意味がないので(smile) 週に一回です。 読み書き
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はアルファベットは読めたんですが。まー簡単なことは読めたんですけど、でもやっぱり、音楽を聴いたり、耳
とかあと絵とかを使って学習するということです。カナダ人でした。はい、楽しかったです、友達が一緒に行っ
ていたので。小さい時はすぐに覚えるんですよ。毎日英語ばっかりの生活をしていると大体わかってくるように
なるんですね。学校で Supervisor みたいな方がいて、すべての授業についてきてくれて、英語だけではなく数学と
か理科とか。すべての科目で判らない事があったら聞くように言われて、半年ぐらい一緒についてくれて、その
人にいろいろ質問とかするようにします。それと加えて、週一回、学校とはまた別に、英語の家庭教師の人につ
いていて、文法とか英語の Comprehension とかをやっていました。放課後でした。イギリス人でした。多分、昔、
教師で退職なさったとか。Primary School か Year 6 とか。その後行った現地校が私立校ではもう普通の授業をうけ
ても大丈夫でした。そういう意味では、日本語はあまり使ってはいませんでしたけど、語彙は日本語の方がかな
りあると思います。そうですね。二年目か三年目ぐらい、10歳ぐらいが一番伸びたとも思います。生きていく
のに必要だったからで。自然に覚えたのは、英語が絶対必要だったからで、イギリスで英語が絶対必要だったの
で学んだと思うので。イギリスに行った時は、やはり生活の為というか、具体的に言うと友達がほしかったし、
遊ぶ相手がほしかったので、やっぱり英語をしゃべれた方が友だちと遊べるし。(Mr. Ta)
In contrast to the previous bilingual student, this mathematics majoring bilingual freshman
(14) spoke without gestures in unusually polite Japanese, which might indicate his parents‟
education or his living or studying experience in the UK at an early age. Firstly, similarly
to the student (11), he talked about the simplistic learning material at Juku. Secondly,
regardless of their learning history, four male early learners (2, 4, 5, 14) said that that
English lesson by NETs with his friends was enjoyable. It is not clear whether the result is
linked to learners (i.e. gender) or whether it depends on teachers. Finally, in contrast to the
student (6), he described his intrinsic motivation to communicate well to make friends. At
one point, he thought he was a normal British (そうした時は、自分も普通のイギリス人であれば良いと思い
ました。).
Similarly to the previous returnee, at an age of eight, he developed the desire to
communicate with others. Finally, he said:
Three years after I moved to the UK when my English proficiency was improving
rapidly, I found myself talking in English to myself because I was surrounded by an
English speaking environment outside my house. But it was difficult to switch to
Japanese language at home.
英国に住んでから三年あまりたって急激に英語力が上がっていたある時、ふと自分の考えや独り言を英語ですべ
て言っていることに気づきました。日常生活の中で家の外では常に英語を使っていたため自然とそうなってしま
ったのでしょう。ただ、家に帰れば親とは日本語で話さなくてはならないため、そこの切り替えが難しかったで
す。(Mr. Ta)
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This student was nine to ten years old when he was able to internalize his discursive
thought in English. However, he had a difficult time to use code-switching at home. This
might suggest that true bilingualism is difficult for students who have monolingual L1
environment at home. I have here another case of a successful learner constructing his
opportunity for a natural English-speaking environment.
Summary
This section investigated the students‟ EFL experience at school and outside school. All of
the participants from Tokyo studied English before taking English at junior high school;
and attended private integrated schools. It may imply that parents‟ attitudes to early
education would have strong influence on academic success of their children. Their
English skills vary widely. In this section, in a way to summarize the results, I will describe
the motivating and demotivating factors that emerged from the data.
The motivating factors that the student mentioned were (1) early learning experience in
small class in familiar environment, (2) NETs‟ ability to create an enjoyable learning
atmosphere, (3) teachers willingness to help students, (4) good teacher-student
relationships, (5) teachers‟ superior pronunciation skills and handouts for grammar learning,
(6) parents‟ positive feedback and students‟ reviewing classes on a daily basis, (7)
appropriate or challenging English content level, 8) interactive classroom atmosphere, (9)
interesting textbooks and finally, the students‟ autonomy.
It may imply that their
motivation factors depend on learners‟ attitudes toward English study.
Then, de-motivating factors that students mentioned include (1) unsocial teachers‟
personalities, (2) rigid teaching methods, (3) teachers‟ low English proficiency, (4) NNETs‟
boring lessons, (5) competitive classroom atmosphere, (6) uninteresting content, (7)
students‟ unwillingness to use English, (8) lack of motivation.
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The data have suggested that the majority of de-motivating factors are teacher-related
rather than student-related.
In addition, difficulties expressed by male students (3, 4, 5, 6) is learning the alphabet and
for others learning articles, pronunciation, and grammar difficulties.
However, I thought that despite learners‟ busy schedule in their competitive environment,
1) students think that the entrance examination is a positive experience, 2) few students
had an experience of direct methods such as presentation, group work, or discussion, 3)
there is a lack of communication with NETs at school, 4) the students have unpleasant
experiences of rote memory learning, 5) school peers affect students‟ self efficacy and
motivation of ES, 6) effective early listening skills;,7) effective oral reading, 8) positive
praise at home and at school, 9), a limited memory of early English education and
finally; 10) importance of autonomy in English study.
In sum, few students experienced setbacks and the students realized their need to enjoy
English study. The following section will be devoted to the English skills that the students
further wish to learn.
2 -k) What type of English skills do students wish to develop
further?
In a previous section, we saw how individual variables come into play in developing
language skills. Some learners are good at communicating with people and developed oral
skills, while some others are competent in receptive skills such as listening. These
differences were shaped by the individual and social environments surrounding the
interlocutors. We have also seen that the students‟ individual needs of English skills are
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skewed by the mid-term need to pass the university entrance exams. Later, after entry to
university, the students note the gaps between their skills and those of real-life situations.
As a result, the students desire to gain critical English skills to fulfil their needs. The term
„need‟ in this study refers to „desire‟ or „want‟. The data analysis of this section goes on to
elucidate specific English skills that students wish to master for higher education and their
life. Finally, the author will address some implications for the EFL syllabus (i.e. material,
instruction, and method). The following Table IV.1 reports the students‟ skills that the
students wish to develop. In the question (i), where the author asked the students‟ about
their most proficient skill, there was a general observation that female students were better
at speaking than their male peers were. Therefore, the data in this section has been divided
into two groups; the data in the first group were from the male students and the data in the
second group were from female students. The table 1 reported that more students wish to
improve speaking, writing, reading, listening and finally pronunciation in descending order
of priority. The data analysis of this section follows in this order.
Table 1 V.1.
What skill do you want to improve or learn more in school?
Speaking
Writing
Mr. Ka
Mr. Ha
Mr. Ta
Ms. Ku
Mr. Ot
Mr. Su
Ms. Ho
Ms. Hi
Ms. To
Ms. No
Ms. Za
Reading
Mr. Se
Mr. Ka
Listening
Mr. Sa
Pronunciation
Mr. Se
Now, the data analysis opens with data from the male students‟ perception of speaking
skills.
a) Speaking:
The first student (1) said:
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My life is confined in Japan. We can study grammar from books by ourselves.
However, speaking is difficult to learn alone from books. It is good to focus on
conversational skills at school.
まったく国内向きで、外国なんてという感じです。やっぱり文法は人から教わらなくても出来ないじゃないです
か。家で本を読めば。でも英会話は難しいのではないですか。そういうのを学校が重視するべきではないですか。
(Mr.Ha)
Likewise,
I was born and brought up in London until I was three years old. However, I do not
remember anything about my life in UK. I was surrounded by Japanese community.
Now, the salient goal of ES is to develop communicative skills. I regretted that I did
not practice speaking and listening skills at school.
ロンドンで生まれまして、三歳までいたので、記憶はないんです。三歳までなので、全然、覚えていないです。
いいえ、いなかったですね。全くの日本人に囲まれました。最後はやはり、Communication がやっぱり出来るよう
になる。すごい後悔しているのは、やっぱり Speaking と Listening をあまり重点をおかず、やっぱり中高とまー,
大学もそうですけど。(Mr. Ot)
These students did not have a need for oral skills prior to university, which resulted in a
failure to utilize opportunities to speak in English. It implies that there is a need for
teachers to create opportunities for oral skills in class. At university, reflecting upon
individual needs for English skills, these male students (1, 2) wish to develop oral skills at
school. It highlights the gaps between the English skills before entering universities and
after matriculation.
A returnee (3) noted:
I usually think in Japanese, but when I get mad, English articulates my feelings
well and I switch to English because English has more vocabulary that is
aggressive and it is easier to express anger in English. I think that language
stimulates feelings.
自分自身の体験からいうと、僕は普段、日本語で考えるのですが、感情的になった時、ついつい英語で考えてし
まうんですよ。例えば罵り言葉とか英語の方が、straight ですし、種類がありますし、なんかいいやすいし、やっ
ぱり、インパクトがあるんで、そう考えるとやはり言語的に感情をつかさどることがあるでしょう。(Mr. Ta )
This student (3) implied that culture is decoded in language. It means that, culture is
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interwoven with, formed and transferred by human interaction. Other male students
expressed their desire to improve oral skills in a similar view. The subsequent section looks
at the female students‟ views. The next student (4) said:
I enrolled in an optional debate course but dropped out after five sessions because
of lack of time and of opinions and it was not compulsory. In addition, I lacked
opinions to participate in debates. Students from western countries are good at
debating skills whereas Japanese students rarely learn these skills at school. I would
like to have instruction of these skills.
大学に入って、文系も理系も二年間は共通過程になっているので、英語は必修科目として、それで大学の二年後
半まで授業は一忚ありました。あとは日本人の先生が行う Writing の授業を受けたと思います。あと Option で受け
られる授業で、大学二年の後半に、えーと、Discussion か、Debate とかの授業を NET の先生で、それは結局、そ
れは必修科目ではなかったので、最後まで出ないで、5 回ぐらい出て Drop Out してしまいました。科目が多かっ
た事もありますし, Debate できるというのは、日本では余りないですけど、海外ではかなり頻繁に行われていて、
よく日本と海外の教育の違いといわれるではないですか、ヨーロッパとかアメリカとかと。だからそういう機会
があればよかったと思います。(Ms. Hi )
Firstly, she (4) described her problem of knowing what to say rather than how in English.
In order to solve this problem, she took a debating class. Then, she dropped out of the class
because it was not required and she had no opinions. Secondly, she agreed with the student
(3) that there are differences in attitudes between Japanese and English speakers. Her main
problem might not come from English skills but from a culture in public speaking (e.g.
reticence). She may suggest that polemical skill is prone to be developed by speakers‟
mother tongues which limits what language instruction can achieve.
The next student (6) spoke similarly;
Our curriculum included reading, listening, and some writing skills. However, the
class was too big, and I feel that learning from NETs was wasted due to a mass
class. There was a discussion class with foreign students but the class was not so
active. I wish we had a chance to speak with NETs during the recess at campus if
only for a short time.
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私の学科は、他の学科は、経済とか法学とかはもう英語の授業はないのですが、私たちの教養学部では3-4年
生になっても英語をある一定範囲、取らなければならないということがあります。ただそこではやはり、Reading
とか Listening がほとんどですね。Writing の授業もありますが、一対 Mass で先生もあまりやる気がないような状
態で、非常にもったいないなーと思っています。留学生が来ているので、留学生と交えて、彼らと日本文化につ
いて Discussion という授業も、まー、形だけになりつつあります。あとは、さきほど申し上げた、Native Speaker
による、外国の Writing の lesson もありました。集団ですと、なかなか進まなかったりとか、判りにくいまま進ん
でしまったりとかいうことがストレスに感じることが多かったです。学校の中に Native の先生がいたのに週一回
しかなかったり、先生達が空きがあって、もしその先生達と10分でもいいからその先生と練習する時間が与え
られていたら良かったと思います。(Ms. Ho)
The student (6) is well aware of the shortcoming of a large class for learning speaking. She
agreed with the other students that Japanese students lack opportunities to practice oral
skills. She implied that this problem is overlooked and suggested that NETs should engage
in students‟ conversation outside class.
The returnee (7) talked about language anxiety:
Successful communication depends more on expressing ideas rather than on using
accurate English. While Japanese students are looking for suitable words,
conversation is proceeding. Japanese students lack communicative skills. I think it
is important to teach how to express their own ideas by using their English
knowledge, however limited it may be.
あれはこれかとこう言えばいいかああいえばと思っているうちに会話が進んでいったり、中々言い出せないんだ
と思っているうちに会話が進んでいく訳ですから。外国語での communication skill に欠けているからです。自分が
英語の知っている範囲の中で、それを結集してどこまで会話ができるかということをもっとしてあげられればい
いと思います。 (Ms. To)
Reflecting on the Japanese culture of reticence, this student (7) agreed with the previous
students that Japanese students tend to cause delays in oral communication. It implied that
oral skill is affected by culture (e.g. paralinguistic interaction, turn taking). Then she
suggested that oral skills would improve by trial-and-error.
Now, the data analysis will turn to writing skills, which are seen as the most needed skills
and the least proficient skills for the students.
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b) Writing skills:
A student (8) said:
It is the English writing skill that I need the most now. I did not have much
experience in writing long essays and I had a difficult time in writing English. At
the university, I will have a lot of opportunities to write formal letters and essays in
English. Regardless of academic disciplines, there is a clear need for English
writing skills at the university. Talking about neatness of writing, before entering
university, students had to hand-in papers in handwriting and my handwriting was
not neat and I had difficult time with it…(with smile). From now on, I wish to write
in English as much as possible.
やはり、Writing につきますね。作文は、あまり長い文をあまり書いたことがなかったので、苦労しました。専門
的な文章を書いたり、Formal な手紙を書いたりする機会が増えると思うのですけど。あとは論文とか、やはり国
際研究に関しては英語が必要なので、物理やるにしても何をやるにしても、英語が論文を書くので、そしたらそ
のためには英語が必要なので、学術の為には英語が必要です。あと、Handwriting は、ちょっと、字が汚かったの
で。きれいさという意味で、今もそうですけど、結構、字が汚いので、(smile) なかなかきれいにかけなかったの
が辛かったですね。そういったフォーマルな英語をどんどん書いていってこなしていかなければいけないと思い
ます。(Mr. Ta )
This bilingual student (8) mentioned that he lacked experience in English writing prior to
university entry. He also implies that there are differences in formal and informal writing
e.g. presenting the ideas cohesively and persuasively in academic English. Therefore, the
school needs to offer opportunities to practice English writing prior to university. He
briefly talked about handwriting. In a different part of the interview, this student said that
the dichotomy of native-non-native becomes relevant in lexical knowledge (ただやっぱり英語が
第二言語だなと感じるのは語彙がやっぱり尐ないと思っているのですよね。).
He may suggest that writing
skills require an audience and teachers‟ or peers‟ feedback.
The next student (9) described the pleasure of writing;
I enjoyed when I saw teachers going through and fix my writing with several new
revisions afterwards.
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楽しかったのは英作文の時間に、やっぱり自分で英作文を作って、先生に添削しているその瞬間は、結構楽しか
ったと思います。毎回先生にみてもらって、その時間は楽しかった。(Mr. Ot)
This student agreed with the previous students that the students need correction to improve
their writing. It may imply that teaching writing skills requires feedback, which may
increase the teachers‟ workload. Despite this, writing skills are clearly needed at higher
education.
A female student (10) spoke similarly;
I appreciated a teacher who taught me a discourse grammar at Juku. For example, it
tells readers how sentences are connected each other. Yes, discourse grammar was
also useful in university entrance exams because students were often asked to
summarize English texts.
英語も、文法だけではなく、文法も大切ですが、談話文法というのを,なにが大事でとか、何が要旨で、ここが例を
あげているとか、テーマを上げてそれをどう展開していくかなど、文の読み方を教えてくれる先生で、それが面白
かったですし、大学入試にも良く役に立ったですね。文章の読み方ですね。一文一文ではなくて。文のつながりを
教えてくださって、そうですね。(談話文法)要約しなさいという問題も入試で良く出るので、その対策にもなりまし
た。(Ms. Za)
This student (10) firstly spoke about differences between English and Japanese writing
principles. Secondly, she said that speaking and reading skills are correlated.
Time constraints make it difficult to learn writing skills. It implies the school needs to
teach composition skills such as paraphrasing expository texts, where students need to
practice a short essay by using their grammatical and lexical knowledge. The
aforementioned students (9, 10) suggested the need of teaching coherent writing skills.
Next, the data analysis will turn to listening skills;
c) Listening skills:
The first male student (11) described shadowing skills:
Although it is rather hypothetical question, I wish if I had more dictation and
shadowing practices at school.
Dictation とか shadowing を典型的な練習をもっと小さい頃からやっていたらもう尐しましな英語にあっていたか、
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はてなはてなと思います。(Mr. Ha)
This engineering student (11) would have liked the use of a shadowing technique – namely
quietly mimicking recorded native speech – to improve his listening skills at school. It
implies a lack of listening opportunities for EFL learners. I tried assessment tools to use
shadowing at his research room and found that shadowing may be more efficient than
chorus-reading because of following native speakers‟ English.
Finally, a female student (12) had difficulty in listening at natural speed:
I wish to tell the following difficulties to native English speakers. When it comes to
interpersonal situations (e.g. one to one), native English speakers modify their
speech rate to accommodate L2 speaker. However, when it comes to an open
conversation, native speakers tend to speak fast ignoring whether non-native can
follow the content or not. We (i.e. non-native speakers) feel isolated or ignored in
this kind of situation. There are quite a number of Japanese people who feel the
same.
欧米人というか NES に言いたいことですが、彼らは私としゃべる時に英語のスピードを落として話しているとい
うか、私が判るようにゆっくりしゃべってくれる。私にとっては Communication がとりやすいのでありがたいで
すが、グループの会話であった時はスピードを落とすことは絶対ないのですね、一対一の時は落としてくれます
が、グループで私だけの時はスピードを落としてくれることは全くないので、無視されている open discussion は中
と寂しい思いをしているというか、無視されている気がします。それは結構多い日本人がそう言うので、あのー。
English Native Speaker に共通するのではないかと思います。(Ms. Za)
The student (12) spoke about her difficulty in following the natural speed of English in
conversation. It suggests that, in a group discussion, the participants may require not only
English language skills, but also content knowledge as well as communicative skills. She
meant that a variety of English spoken by the participants would interfere with listening. In
a group discussion, attendants have little idea about the participants‟ language
backgrounds.
The aforementioned students attributed difficulties of listening because of paralinguistic
features, which do not exist in Japanese. In order to offer a solution for this problem, the
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student suggested giving instructions for awareness of pitch patterns and using a
shadowing technique during lessons. The next section will look at reading skills.
d) Reading skills
The first student (13) talked about his reading strategy:
I want to read research journals more easily. For example, I do not prefer to use
dictionary nor translate English into Japanese because translation makes the
meaning unclear. I am now making efforts to understand English in English.
とにかく、論文をすらすらと読めるようになりたいし。英語の単語を調べたり、ただ、あまり日本語を入れたり
して、訳しながら読むのは好きじゃないので。日本語が入ると日本語に惑わされて判らなくなるので、なるべく
英語のままでおきたいと努力しています。(Mr. Ka)
This student wished to improve his skills in reading academic articles. This student agreed
with the returnee (8), who said in another part of the interview that, it is important to think
in L1 language.
The next student (14) spoke as follows.
I think teaching reading and pronunciation skills should be prioritized at school.
Then listening skills will be naturally promoted. School can offer these skills
despite a limitation of school hours.
限られた中であれば、読むこと、speaking というよりは発音を鍛えることが大切だと思います.聞く事も出来る様
になると思います。それが学校でできるぎりぎりのところなのかなと思います。(Mr. Se)
This English teacher and PhD student was aware of advantages of reading to develop
listening skill. This student contradicts student (1) in that he placed a priority of ES in
passive skills within give time at school. The contradictory result seems to indicate that
there exist individual differences in skills of English.
The next male student (15) spoke about the level of textbook content.
“Progress” textbooks were used for two years at junior high school and they are
very interesting. Then, “New Horizon” was used for the third year in junior high
school and it was too easy. I was class president and asked an English teacher to
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change textbooks saying “The context is not good enough for us.” This appeal did
not go through. Therefore, I decided to pre-review textbooks, and studied for the
entrance examination at Juku.
中学二年までは Progress だったんですけど。それで三年から New Horizon になって、これはすごく簡単な教科書だ
ったのです。思い出話になりますけど、自分が先頭に立って職員室に行って教科書を変えろと頼みに言ったこと
があります。こんなんじゃだめだと。変えてくれなかったです。だから学校でできるものは全部予習してしまっ
て、あとは塾で大学入試に備えるということです。(Mr. Sa)
Likewise, a female student (16):
Our school used “Progress” edited by a missionary for high proficiency learners at
private school. The texts were long and challenging. At first, I found it difficult to
understand the texts. Gradually my reading, writing and lexical knowledge have
improved a lot over time. I learned a lot from these textbooks. (Ms. Za )
Progress English という、あのー、大阪かなにかの、あのー、神父様が作った教科書があって、よく私立の中高一
貫の学校で使われているのですが, はい、チョッと,まー、進度の速い教科書ですが、それを多くの学校が使って
いますが、うちもそれを取り入れていて普通に授業がありました。役に立ったと思います.私の学校の教科書は
公立の学校が使っている教科書でなかったのですが、Progress English という教科書だったのでそれはわりとレベ
ルが高くて、結構難しい教科書で長文も長かったし、英作文も結構難しかったので、ついていけないというか、
それが完璧に出来るということはほとんどないのですが、それを繰り返しやっていくことによって、公立の教科
書を使うより語彙はあり、教科書はほぼすべて Reading と writing と grammar でした。身についたと思います。
She (16) agreed with the previous student that she successfully developed her reading
skills thanks to the challenging reading textbooks used at school. In this vein, both students
(15, 16) singled out the most/least interesting textbook and showed that learners‟ with
higher motivation prefer challenging reading materials. It means that good materials serve
to supports students‟ motivation whereas some materials were below their proficiency
levels. Then, the student recommended teachers‟ needs to prepare extra readings for higher
levels of learners. Referring to reading, in the research question (j), these students agreed
with the usefulness of pre/post-oral reading of school textbooks. (私は教科書をよく音読をしていた
のですよ、教科書を音読すればかなり出来るかなーって思いました。) This
means that simultaneous uses of
aural and visual stimulus would foster their potential communicative skills by keeping
language input into long-term memory. These students (14, 15, 16) agreed their preferences
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for reading difficult texts to easier ones.
In contract, another student (17) said:
Textbooks at junior high school were boring to read and, I think, even teachers did
not like it. English in the textbooks were so easy. But textbooks for the high school
emphasized reading skill for university exams and I enjoyed reading the stories in the
textbooks a lot.
中学校の教科書というのはつまらないというばかりではなく、その先生自体があまり英語が好きではなかったと思
います。というのは内容が余りにも多分簡単すぎたと思います。日常会話ではこんな会話をしないじゃないですか
というものが出てきていたので、あまり興味が出なかったです。それに比べて高校は受験を取り入れていたので、
しゃべるほうがあまりないのですが、読む方では本当に文章として面白ので、試験の時に読んでいると内容的に、
もう尐し先まで読みたいなと思う内容がちょこちょこ出てきました。(Ms. Ku)
This student (17) was able to scan and read long sentences. She agreed with the student
(15) that textbooks in junior high school were boring for her while textbooks at senior high
school were enjoyable and enjoyed reading. It implied that reading comprehension
activates when readers concentrate on getting the gist of the content.
To summarize (1) the students lacked contextualized English usage, as more challenging
contexts were more interesting; and that (2) length of textbooks de/motivate students in
reading; and (3) easiness/difficulty of school textbooks may be attributed to content
knowledge.
e) Pronunciation
This study implies that Japanese student learners value the native pronunciation and prefer
learning the native-norm of English pronunciation. In contrast, Korean students did not
prioritize this as long as their communication was successful (No, et. al. 2008:83). First,
we shall see how Japanese male students (18, 19) said:
I admire a teacher (i.e. NNET) with good English pronunciation.
発音のいい先生だったので、すごくそれにあこがれて。 (Mr. Sa)
Similarly;
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NETs‟ pronunciation is attractive I enjoy learning from NETs.
はやり発音がきれいですし、こちらの言うこともよく伝わるし、はやり NET はいいと思います。(Mr. Ot)
Regardless of NETs or NNETs, these male students agreed that native norms of
pronunciation have an authenticity and motivate students to learn English.
A female student (20) agreed with the male students:
I can put up with NNETs‟ intolerant attitudes if they had correct English
pronunciation.
先生は自分のことに自信を持っている先生が多くて、すごくきれいな発音の先生だったらもちろんそれはかまわ
ない。Ku
Likewise the next female student (21),
An advantage of studying English at an early age would be to develop better
pronunciation because many Japanese students are reluctant to speak English owing
to their English pronunciation with an accent.
早いと良いと思うのは発音の問題で、発音を気にして出来なくなる日本人が多いのではないかと、周りでも感じ
ますし。(Ms. Ho)
In the same vein, another female student (22) said,
I value a native-like pronunciation and want to learn good pronunciation at early
age, whereas at junior high school it is early enough to learn grammar and
vocabulary.
私は発音をこだわってきたほうなので、なるべく柔軟なうちに NS の発音に触れることはいいことなのかという印
象です。ただ、文法だったり単語だったり、そういった細かい知識的なこと側面を覚えれば何とかなるというこ
とを小さい頃からする必要がなくて、それは中学校に入ってから十分出来ると思います。 (Ms. Hi0
She noted that it is difficult to achieve the native like pronunciation. Nevertheless, they (20,
21, 22) agreed that native-norm of pronunciation is important for effective communication.
To summarize, many students value native-like English pronunciation in class, while they
are more relaxed outside classroom. It may be that our groups of students are more
sensitive to English pronunciation within classroom than outside. The argument by both
male and female students favours pronunciations of native speakers.
f) Communication
I think my parents wished me to be familiarized with English speaking situations. I
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did not have any idea whether English will be useful or not for my future, but
attended English lesson at early age because it was enjoyable. Next year, I will
become a full-time English teacher. I would like to develop better communicative
skills in English for the situation with NETs as well as for my teaching in class.
親としては,子供の頃から英語に親しんでもらいたいとの考えがあったのだと思います.子供の私としては,英
語が役に立つとかそういった目的は特になく,面白そうだからというくらいの理由しかなかったように思います。
来年度から高等学校の英語教員になるので,生徒に教えたり,ネイティブスピーカーの教員と円滑に意思疎通が
できるようにしたりするために英語を学んでいます。(Mr. Se)
This PhD student (13) who got a job to teach English at a well-known senior high school,
agreed with the student (12), and wished to communicate with native speakers freely. Since
non-native speakers have limits in comprehension, it is difficult to see how well students
communicate within limited time. It may suggest that the students need to overcome
anxiety and self-doubt for effective intercultural communication. For this student, whether
it is written or spoken, communicative skill plays an important role in ES today.
Summary
This section aimed to elucidate the students‟ needs in respect of English skills that prepare
them to deal with their educational or occupational requirements as identified by
themselves. It was found that most students want to develop productive skills (speaking
and writing) to tackle with their disciplines‟ requirements. The major findings are as
follows:
a. Speaking: Male students had more reluctant attitudes towards speaking than the female
students. However, this deviation does not appear to correspond with their respective
English abilities. The pedagogical recommendation is to conduct oral activities (e.g.
mock-up telephone conversations) or debates at an early age. In addition, students
welcome opportunities to speak with NETs outside class.
b. Some students added that topics in English conversation classes were boring.
週に一時間
だけ英会話の時間があったのです、それでカナダの先生が来て、まー簡単なかいわですね。すごく簡単ですよ。Do you
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ski,? Yes I do.とか、本当に簡単なことでしたよ。簡単でつまらなかったです。
It may imply that teachers
need to identify topics that are interesting to the students. (Mr. Sa)
c. In this study, writing was found to be the most difficult of all English skills. Three male
students said they had a difficult time in mastering the alphabet in junior high school.
Finally, the student said that they need teachers‟ and peers‟ feedback on their writing.
The content of their writing was not mentioned as being critical here in the way it was
felt to be in speaking. There is no difference between native and non-native norms in
writing. It is a rigorous discipline in language learning and the generally
high-achieving group of students that we interviewed was particularly frustrated about
their (perceived) low achievement in this category.
d. The students‟ listening comprehension was affected by a variety of English
pronunciations and L1 interferences such as phonological blind spots and by speed.
The student recommended using oral reading, shadowing, and listening with visual
stimulus (e.g. flash cards).
e. Reading is perceived as the most required skill at Japanese school. Main factors for
reading include inadequate levels of reading material, insufficient length of reading
material, and the appropriate reading strategies such as reading without L1 translation
for high proficiency readers. Oral reading is strongly recommended by the students.
f. For pronunciation, both male and female students considered native-like pronunciation
as most desirable. For this purpose, early education was perceived to be effective.
g. One student (an English language teacher) wished to improve communicative skills in
intercultural communication. He considered that reading and pronunciation are the top
two priorities to teach at school because he perceived that, those skills are vital to other
language skills (e.g. listening).
The students in this study identified learning priorities at school as speaking, writing,
listening, reading, and pronunciation practices in descending order, while Moore
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(2002) prioritizes listening, speaking, reading, writing, and culture. The results are in
line with MEXT‟s goal of communicative skills. The increasing demands of speaking
and writing skills would be reflecting the demands from cultural and economical
globalization. There was no gender deviation in the corresponding data. In the
following section, the data analysis will continue with changes that students want to
bring about.
2-l ) What kind of change do students want in EFL?
Having had the opportunity to look into the students‟ insights and feelings, the previous
section explored the skills that the students further need. Finally, I asked the students‟
suggestions on changes to their language program. The term `changes` is defined here as
modifications that students wished to make on a long term basis. This section aims to
present collections of students‟ views on EFL in verbatim quotes in said regard, as a way of
capturing changes that students‟ desired, and identify selected primary themes in these
examples towards a critical language study review. The data analysis in this section is
grouped into two sections: 1) instruction) and 2) the learning materials. The data analysis
will proceed in the same order. The similarities and differences of the opinions will be
highlighted to understand how these perspectives were shaped. At first, we will look into
the activities the students found useful in ES.
1) Instruction
The first student (1) talked about translation:
I am not keen on literal translation. I feel frustrated to translate from Japanese to
English at a word-to-word level. I think fluency is more important to interpret
English naturally. Even if we do not know the meaning of an adjective in a sentence,
we can still comprehend the content. Thereby, I believe that cohesive interpretation
is more useful rather than emphasizing for a word-to-word translation. (Mr. Su)
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えーと、そうですね、えーと、英訳というのがあまりすきではないというか, 逐語訳, 英語のひとつの単語をひと
つの日本語に置き換えていくというのは、えーと、あまりー、役に立たないのではないかと考えています。文章
全体の意味が取れてればよくて、例えば、形容詞だとかは、たいていな場合、具体的な意味がわからなくても、
文章の何が言いたいのかという意味が判るので、そこをあまり重視しなくてもいいのではないかと考えています。
This student (1) pointed out problems of the direct translation, which treats words in
isolation without their cohesion in a text. An early learner might not consider parting
individual words from meaning, but this advanced learner suggested a change in
instruction from semiotic translation to coherent reading of a text.
Similarly, a bilingual student (2) spoke about co-referentiality.
The students in the UK spend a lot of time on reading, while Japanese university
examines accuracy in grammar and lexicon usages. In my university entrance
exams, I relied on my intuition to answer the questions. This is a difference
between students in Japanese school and native speakers…Yes, my intuition was
mostly accurate. Questions on articles were the most difficult. For example, I still
need to improve how to use “a” or “the”.
僕はイギリスの現地校でならったので翻訳とか一切なかったのです。海外の英語の授業では文法はやらないで、
全くなかったので、ほとんど講読でしたけど、でも日本では文法とか正確性を求められて、一種の法則を当ては
めるみたいで、僕の場合はそういうのを問題を解く場合でもいちいち文法的にに考えないで、感で、たとえば黙
読してこれがふさわしいなと思ったら、自分でドンドン黙読しながら、どんどんうめていったんですが、そこが
日本で取り組んできた人と違うんです。はい、大体あたるんですよ。ただ一番難しいのは Article、a とか the と
か、品詞、あれはいくら練習しても出来なかった。難しいですね。 (Mr. Ta)
This returnee (2) agreed with the previous student (1) that they have to read and understand
the text directly in English. It means that advanced learners‟ reading strategies are similar
to those of L1 readers. They supported a finding of previous section (k) in that reading is
one of the priorities in English study.
The next student (3) spoke about listening:
It would have been better if I had an environment to constantly listen to English
language. Thus, I would like to have increasing English listening opportunities at
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school. (Mr. Ha )
やはりコンスタントに英語は聞かされる環境があったらましだったかと思います。学校とかでいいと思います。
In contrast to the previous students (1, 2), this acoustic engineering student suggested uses
of audio stimuli rather than visual materials in instruction. This may be an individual
preference of learning style.
For instruction, this contradictory result seems to indicate that there existed differences in
proficient skills. In another part of interview, the students (1, 2) said that their listening
skills are good, while the later student (3) said that he has no proficient English skills.
However, it appears that three students (1, 2, 3) suggested using vernacular English which
improves comprehensive understanding of a text.
It implies that effective teaching
depends on students‟ competence levels.
The next student (4) talked about the compulsory nature of English study;
I wish I had a compulsory discussion course. Debate skills are important outside
of Japan. I think that debating skills are acquired in education in the UK or in the
USA. I think it is important to teach debate skills in EFL. (Ms. Hi)
その英語に関して言えば、もう尐し Discussion する機会が強制的にあればよかったなーと思います。強制的にじゃ
なかったから、自分自身で受けたけど、大変だったしまーいいやとぬけてしまいました。無理やりあったほうが
いいです。結局 Debate Skill できるというのは、日本では余りないですけど、海外ではかなり頻繁に行われていて、
よく日本と海外の教育の違いといわれるではないですか。だからそういう機会があればよかったと思います。
As we have seen in another part of this study, this successful learner of English dropped
out of the debating course due to her lack of opinions. She suggested including debating
skills as a compulsory subject.
The next student (5) spoke differently.
Whatever comes first, communicative willingness is important in language
education. Instead of worrying about accuracy in grammar and vocabulary use, it is
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good to introduce interactive oral activities. However, writing is also important at
school.
何でもいいからとにかくしゃべろうという気にならないと。発音というより、こだわらずに、そんな発音より、
とにかく話せるように、そういう姿勢を先に作って欲しいと思います。やはり、文字がわからないと。(Ms No)
The student (5) is in line with the result in the section (k) in that communication is the goal
of English study and speaking and writing skills are the two priorities at school. She might
suggest that apprehension of English use or self-doubt might affect communicative skills.
The next female student (6) spoke about the early education.
At Japanese school, students sometimes develop an inferior complex in leaning
mathematics or music. I mean that some students are gifted with musical talents
whereas some others are good at drawing. This might be the same in English. Then,
preventing to develop an inferior complex in ES is pivotal for early age learning.
Therefore, I prefer EFL at elementary school without assessment. Then, I
recommend teaching listening skills, which may be in line with the critical period
hypothesis. In addition, I suggest change that learners will be able to enjoy learning
English for conversation rather than as an academic subject in its own right.
Therefore, instead of teaching grammatical and lexical rules, I suggested teaching
listening English even if the pupils do not understand the whole text.
今の日本の教育のあり方では、とても算数が一年生の時から苦手だとかいうこがいたりするとか、あと音楽もテ
ストでうまく笛がふけなくて嫌いだとか、そういう子が多くて、英語を早く始めれば始める方がいいと思います
が、それが、苦手意識が早く生まれてしまう様な勉強は良くないと思います。それでテストとか評価が全くなく
て、判らないけど聞いて真似ているだけでいいとか、さわってとりあえずきれいな生の英語を聞いているだけで
いいのでしたら、臨界期の前の状態でしたら、その前からそういう機会に触れるのでしたらいいと思います。あ
と Change ですか。最初から文法で学問学問した感じで教えられていくのは、最初の内には訳が判らない状態でも
取り合えず練習していくというのが良いのではないかと思います。文法で公式とかを覚えてから使うのでなくて、
まず訳が判らなくてもとりあえず聞いてみるとか、そういうのが良いと思います。(Ms. Ho)
First, this student (6) meant that different things work for different people. She agreed with
the previous students in addressing the following changes in EFL for early age learners: 1)
avoid having the same expectation of all students, 2) place EFL in a less competitive
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environment, 3) increase input for listening, 4) create a comfortable atmosphere in class,
and 5) select native-speakers‟ listening material.
The female returnee (7) spoke likewise:
Most students began learning English at junior high school, and it is important to
cultivate positive attitudes towards English study because an ultimate goal of
language study is communication. Therefore, it is important to enjoy learning the
language. For pronunciation, I think it is more important to focus on fluency rather
than on accuracy or worrying about making mistakes.
英語について言えば、英語に触れる機会は中学だと思いますが、英語に対しての親しみとか、すきだという気持
ちが芽生えられるようなことがあればいいと思います。英語が勉強だ勉強だということになると、本来はコミュ
ニケーションのツールになったので、楽しいと思える教え方があればいいと思います。例えば、音声のことです
が、繰り返しより、間違ってもいいから、とにかく英語で話すということができればいいと思います。(Mr. To)
This returnee (7) agreed with the student (5) about the highest priority on communicative
skills in EFL. She agreed with the previous students in suggesting the need to create an
enjoyable atmosphere. Here, we see that more female students (5, 6, 7) spoke about the
teachers‟ efforts in creating a comfortable atmosphere in EFL.
Then, a male returnee student (8) talked about rhetoric.
From the beginning of the interview, I wanted to say that I want to improve oral
skills e.g. speak with humour or being persuasive or with the ability to convey my
feelings. These abilities are not the ones that we learn at school. These skills may
come up by seeing many people, watching television. Then, we can expand a
communicative network.
僕はむしろ、学校の勉強ではなくて、なんかこう、会話、うまい会話ができる英語ができればよかったなーって
最初にいいたかったのですけど、たとえが学校の英語ではなくて、人を説得する英語だとか、うまく感情を伝え
る英語だとか、学校ではあまり教えてくれない英語というのがあると思うのですよ。それはもっといろいろな人
の話を聞いたり、いろいろなテレビを見たりとして、話術を学んだり、そういうところを勉強したら、もっと人
間関係が広がったのではないかと思っています。(Mr. Ta)
This returnee (8) asserted that the effective oral skills might be unconsciously learned
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outside classroom, which has two layers: 1) utilizing multimedia outlets and 1) sharing
activities with native speakers. He agreed here with the student (4).
The next student (9) talked about priorities.
I lack oral skills and opportunities to speak in English while I can write English by
myself. Furthermore, speaking is the most demanded skills when travelling abroad.
But EFL in Japan ignores this situation and students have to attend English school.
私はやはり英語を勉強していて足りないなと思うことは Speaking で、Writing は一人で出来るけど、場所がなかっ
たり、機会がなかったら出来ないし、でーかつ、実際外国に行って一番使うのは Speaking で、そこが日本では重
視されていなくて、結局自分からそういう、英語学校に行ったりしたり、そういう機会を作らないと使えないと
いう。(Ms. Hi)
The student (9) agreed with the student (7) that Japanese students lack opportunities to
speak English. The aforementioned female students (5, 6, 7, 9) stressed a need for oral
practice at school to meet their needs in intercultural communication. Oral skills might
arise with intercultural experience.
In sum, the suggestions that the students made for the changes in EFL were: 1) appropriate
reading instructions incorporating the learners‟ comprehension levels, 2) the mixed use of
aural, auditory, and visual materials, depending on learners‟ learning styles, 3) to develop
English rhetoric for higher achievers, 4) to provide speaking opportunities, and 5) to
introduce listening practice at an early age.
2) Textbooks
In the previous section (k), we had seen that a textbook plays an important role in
instruction and students‟ motivation. In this section, the students talked about textbook
evaluation.
The first students (11) commented about his textbooks at junior high school.
Most of passages in the textbooks in junior high school were colloquial dialogues.
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When I was at school, I was not aware of a shortage of content. Now I wonder how
the students learnt from the limited material of the textbooks at school.
中学校の教科書はほぼ全部会話でしたね。そうですね、まー、当時はなんとも思ってなかったですけど。いま中学校
の教科書を読み返すとよくこんなんで勉強できたなと,これだけしか勉強しなかったと思います。(Mr. Ka)
This engineering student (11) pointed out a lack of content in the textbook at his public
junior high school. It implies that textbook at public school lack stimulus.
Likewise,
The textbook at my school - “Crown” set out with a four-panel cartoon. At first,
cartoon characters appears from the drawer and introduced the key sentences like
“Hello, my name is Yoko.” or “Nice to meet you.” Then, teachers explained a story,
and then, students did chorus reading and practice the phrases with students by
language games. After that, students learn grammar rules such as how to use the „b
verb‟.
その教科書、四コマ漫画みたいな教科書があって、その中のキャラクターが引き出しの中に、hello,
I am Yuko”と
か””Nice to meet you.”とかいった感じの漫画みたいのがあって、みんなが読んで、先生がその文法を説明してくれて、
またみんなが読んで、そのー、なんていうかな、それを使いながら、ゲームとか隣の人とやって見ましょうという感
じです。でー、後はその、文法の詰め込み見たいのもありまして、これは B 動詞―。(Mr. Na)
This student (12) also attended a public school. Firstly, he agreed with the previous student
(11) that the textbooks at public school have a lot of visual aids, which are uninteresting to
the students. Secondly, he noted that the major purpose of the textbook is to teach
vocabulary and grammar domains in short sentences. However, the students said that the
sentences in English textbook used at private school are longer than those in public schools
and the contents are enjoyable to read. It suggested that the school needs to provide
different materials for commutative skills i.e. speaking and reading skills.
The next student (13) is an English teacher at high school:
What change do I wish to make? Firstly, I want to change the English textbooks at
school. The reading materials are insufficient. There would be many good reading
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materials such as short stories using the most frequent English words for the Test of
English for International Communication (hereafter TOEIC) at the market. Such
material is good for junior high school students. However, teachers are allowed to
use only the textbooks at school. I want to use these additional materials. The
problem is not the syllabus, but I think, it is necessary to improve textbooks content
by adding more exercises for practical purposes.
なにが変わっていたという事ですか。どこか変えるとしたら、一番に言いたいのは、えー、分量を増やす事です
ね。あのー、例えば、今、すごく教材が充実していて、あのー、TOEIC の点数別に語彙を分けて、その語彙だけ
をあるレベルの語彙だけを使って Rewrite して、簡単に書かれている日本の小説とか外国の小説がたくさんあると
思うのですけども、あの、そういうものであれば、中学生でも簡単に読めると思うので、とのかく。あのー、分
量が尐なくて、学校で配られる教科書準拠の問題集というのも、結局は、教科書でやったことしか出せないわけ
ですから非常に尐ないーー、と思うので、そのレベルだと、その分量だと、どう考えても英語は身につかないな
というるふうに思います。ので、あの、教える内容というよりも、例えば、中学校でも仮定法とかいうことでは
なくて、いま教えている分量でもかまわないから、もっとそれを見たり、使ったりする機会をつくるように教科
書を改善すべきだと思います。(Mr. Se)
This student (13) said that a textbook influences teaching methods, classroom activities
and students‟ role. Then, he agreed with the previous students (11, 12) in that the textbooks
are below their students‟ level and suggested a need of textbook evaluation. It means that
textbooks present: 1) material, 2) practice contents, 3) review materials, and 4) students‟
autonomy.
Lastly, a female student said:
I usually do not regret about myself. However, I wish if I had met a Swiss friend
earlier. I learned a lot from this intercultural communication.
たくさんあって、とくに英語に関してはたくさんのことを教えてくれました。(Ms. Za)
She recommended having English - speaking friends to enjoy language learning. Other
students spoke similar about their suggestion of changes without mentioning the new
topics. This section will be summarized as follows.
Summary
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Let us first summarize the change that students wished for the future. Five students talked
about instructions for reading in that they want more attention paid to 1) textual coherence,
co-referentiality in reading rather than direct translation, 2) teaching debate skills, and 3)
focus on listening skills at elementary school. Meanwhile, six female students suggested
using the communicative approach, while one student suggested using speaking and
writing skills concurrently. A male student recommended utilizing more audio stimuli and
practices rather than visual materials.
As for textbooks, the students pointed out that the textbooks using dialogic texts were easy
and boring. A student recommended a need for textbook and uses of materials with higher
language levels. Despite teachers‟ limits in choosing teaching materials, one suggested
teachers should use handouts to supplement the textbooks.
Overall, most of the students spoke about materials, which requires students‟ need analysis
and renewals. This suggests that choice of teaching material (i.e. textbooks) would largely
determine teaching methods, providing input, and students‟ role. Furthermore, the
textbooks influence the students‟ motivation. In this vein, the data showed that the
students‟ views on textbooks are important because textbook contents influence the
pedagogical choice, which is relevant to classroom activities.
Conclusion of this chapter
In this chapter, the students‟ views on their EFL experience and on EFL pedagogies were
analyzed. Various views on pedagogies, English proficiency, cultural and socio-economical
aspects were noted. The study found that: 1) the students were thoughtful, 2) they do not
consider the situations problematic, 3) they offered possible causes of the factors that affect
English performance. The implications that I draw are influenced by the nature of the
participants as described in the chapter on methodology.
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The first noticeable phenomenon is that the mastering English skills is not a canonical
outcome at school, and that the students need primarily reading skills. For their instruction,
few students had attended schools that used the monolingual method in their compulsory
education. As to their learning material, most students prefer narrative stories rather than
dialogic patterns. Although this study does not look for consensus, quantitative data has
naturally been yielded by counting the numbers of students in favour, against or not
decided/neutral on each issue.
Secondly, for starting age of English study, all students with early exposure to English
speaking environment agreed that English language experiences after an age of six does
not link to their English skills. This might mean that the use of early education in EFL
environments is exaggerated.
The third point is that the majority of the students did not favour English-only instructions
(i.e. monolingual, the direct method). In contrast, some students did not prefer the NETs‟
use of Japanese in class. Further, the student said that they enjoy NETs classes more than
NNETs‟ lessons because they created more comfortable atmosphere in class. One of the
explanations for this might be that humanity and good relations are a prerequisite for
English teachers.
Fourthly, for communicative skills, the data reported that any English pedagogy would not
elicit English proficiency unless a student recognizes the fact that a lack of English milieu
would not affect their English proficiency. This might mean that grammatical skills would
be a main driver in successful communication.
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The fifth point is that the low English proficiency at Japanese school was seen as a hidden
political and ideological facet of foreign language studies in Japan.
Finally, the analysis has expanded its focus to the exploration of cross-cultural aspects of
forging language studies. According to the students, an ultimate goal of English study is to
restore global communication though intercultural experiences in global era. Then,
students contended that the critical importance of a role of English language is to reconnect
each other through intercultural experience.
To recapitulate, this study looked into Japanese students‟ views on EFL principles and their
EFL experiences. Further, the study looked into plausible reasons or the basis of what
researchers are promulgating are the problematic areas of EFL learners in Japan. In the
next chapter, I will discuss these pedagogical, socio-linguistic issues in turn to see whether
these views agreed with existing literatures
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V. Discussion and Conclusion
1. Introduction
The emergence of English as a lingua franca has been followed by disputes over Japanese
students‟ English skills, the choice of discourse mode in class, teaching material, and
instructional models. While several researchers (e.g. Nazari, 2007; Llurda, 2004; Sakui and
Cowei, 2012) investigated teachers‟ perceptions in EFL, students‟ views have too long
been ignored in understanding these issues both at an international level and – of specific
interests here – within the Japanese context (Zhour 2009). Accordingly, as I said in Chapter
II, the purpose of the thesis has been to investigate these missing dimensions. Hence, this
study investigated Japanese university students‟ views by semi-structured interviews with
fourteen university students in Japan. In this chapter, we will compare what the students
said with what Japanese commentators have said (i.e. both Japanese writers and foreigners
who have written about Japan). I will also compare their views with research
internationally to indicate the significance of their views.
The thematic data analysis in chapter IV generated holistic views on English attainments in
Japan and pedagogical recommendations for EFL classes. Before examining the specific
research questions, three general observations on the data can be made. The students had
clear opinions on several principles of instruction and were happy to share their views.
Secondly, the students refused to see themselves as victims of their culture or of their
geographic isolation from native English-speaking countries, two issues, which have often
been presented by other commentators. Finally, they had high motivation for learning EFL
and made suggestions for improving provision. The purpose of this section is to discuss the
empirical evidence base of this study and, where relevant, relate it to the existing literature
by way of addressing our research questions.
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2. The meaning of the findings and their comparison to their
research literature
In order to account for the performance in English at Japanese school, this study attempted
to discover the students‟ views on pedagogical methods and of their EFL experience. In
this section, the author will compare their views and values as elicited in the interviews to
corresponding findings in existing literature. The key factors we consider here are: 1)
instruction e.g. professional skills, teachers‟ personality, starting age, learning models; 2)
personal factors including goals- motivation, role of positive feedback, attitudes and
performance; and 3) the impact of national interest/power on English instruction.
Main Research Question 1 - What are students‟ opinions about EFL principles?
a) What are their views about the use of the Monolingual Method?
The students‟ views were mixed, and they thought that implementing English-only
instruction depends on learners‟ age and levels. In particular, they thought that early
learners and proficient students would benefit more in the monolingual class, whilst for
poorer and mid-level students, misinterpretation can arise due to lack of coreferentiality
(i.e. mutual understanding). A bilingual student proposed that it is possible to think directly
in English, but this does not take into account that every language is rooted in a culture
(Maybin 1993:5), and that language and cultural understandings are interrelated
(Widdowson, 2003, Jenkins, Modiano, and Seidlhofer ( in Bolton et al. eds. 2006:45-46).
The emphasis on use of English only in Japanese classrooms - the monolingual method has been commented on, as we said in chapter II, by Hashimoto (2004). He supports using
230
English only, whereas Matsuura, et al. (2004:486) found that the students prefer NNETs‟
L1 use in class. Likewise, Weschler (1997) investigating EFL in Japan remarked a low
feasibility of English - only - instruction in Japanese schools because of lack of dedicated
time. Other researchers (e.g. Berger and Luckmann, 1966:136; Weschler 1997; Liao, 2006)
consider that L1 translation is necessary for EFL class due to the cultural gap.
b) What are their views about advantage and disadvantages of NETs and NNETs?
The students interviewed here learned English from both NETs and NNETs, which is
inconsistent with Ho (2004:4) saying that “...much of the English language teaching is
done by native-English speaking teachers.” Among Japanese commentators, our findings
corresponded with Saito and Ebsworth (2004:117)‟s study in that the preference for
particular teachers depends on their professional skills of fluency in English and the
atmosphere in class rather than on whether the teacher is a NET or not. In contrast, Honna
and Takeshita (2003: 206- 207) noted that the JET program will give an impetus to changes
in EFL. More generally, the students said that, regardless of nationality, teachers‟
immediacy, i.e. communicative behaviour, could reduce the distance between teacher and
learner, which was valued by our subjects.
Among international commentators, Christophers and Gorham (1995:293) described
„immediate‟ teachers as having positive affects on their class. In practice, the student
agreed with Weschler (1997) and Gobel et al.
(2007: 165) that learning support (e.g.
self-made handouts) are important motivators. Further, the student said those teachers‟
emotional factors effects teaching and assessment, as was found by Stevick (1996:6). For
example, some students prefer error- corrections on the spot, whereas others are
discouraged by making mistakes in class. For this, Truscotte (1996: 328) and Coder
(1981:51) posit that in most cases, error-correction has little effect on improvement of
English writing or speaking. In sum, this section is summarized by a student, “I prefer
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teachers who know English well rather than native speakers.” I have no problems learning
English from Japanese teachers who have experience.” NETs いうより、英語を良くわかっていらっしゃ
る先生ならそれでいい思います。こうすればこうなると手順を踏んで教えてもらえるので、きちんと指導できるなら NNETs
でもいいと思います。体験がある人に教わりたいので、もし自分が教わるなら NNETs でもいいと思います。(Mr. Ka) ”
c) What are their views about the claim „the earlier, the better‟?
The students thought that early English education would provide cultural exposure to the
English-speaking world, readiness to learn a new language, higher motivation to study
English compared to late starters, and good pronunciation skills. Referring to starting age,
the students also agreed with Shiono (1989:299) that it is rather late to start language study
once learners experience embarrassment in making mistakes or copying others. One
student said “In order to reduce anxiety to learn a new language, it might be good to start
early.
抵抗が尐なくするという意味では早い始めるのはいいのかもしれませんけど”.
Other student mentioned,
“Japanese students are busy studying L1 and it is better to start English from the age ten.
だから日本人だったら日本語で覚えることが一杯あるので、10 歳ぐらいでいいと思います。.”
As to a starting age, Scovel (1988:133) denoted, “Pronunciation development involves
neuromuscular action.” while Burr (2003:141-2) said, “Memory comes along with the
impression of continuity and coherence.” It may mean that students need cognitive
readiness to start L2. Our student said, “I suggest focusing on speaking at elementary
school by adding writing to subordinate information. Speaking
ればいいかと(Among
が中心で、
それに追加として文字情報があ
international commentators, Dijigunovic, Kikonov, and Otto (2008)‟
study showed that an early start not only facilitates language skills but also impacts on the
affective domain. In this study, the students‟ views on starting learning English early
conflicts with Graddol (2006:122)‟s view that “EFL learners would not necessarily gain
competitive advantages from learning English early.” Similarly, Singleton (1989:266)
posits that “...early has positive gain in later days.” This data also supported Byram
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(2008:16) that “The level of achievement should be a function of the time devoted to
language learning.” In a similar vein, Edelenbos et al. (2007) noted that the time factor
seems to be the most reliable predictive factor explaining difference in young learners‟ FL
development. (Digunovic et al. 2008:434). It means that time and effort is seen as an
enabler for developing English skills rather than starting age. We sum this up in the words
of one interviewee who said, “Early exposure to second language could have a positive
effect in later days.”
d) What are their views about learning English as a lingua franca or Standard
English?
In the majority, the students in this study prefer learning SE over LF by pointing out the
practical difficulty in studying LF at school. Some students felt that SE is more authentic
than LF. This study showed that Japanese students prefer SE, which suits to their goal of
learning all requisite language skills. They felt that coded syntactic rules provide
authenticity and ensure applicability. Our data is consistent with Honna, et al. (2003) and
Nakamura (2010) who surmise that paralinguistic factors (e.g. accent, stress) in LF
negatively affect comprehensibility.
At an international level, the students‟ position reflects their desire to learn a well-defined
object. McKay (2002:14) noted that the large scale of the spread of English is due to
bilingual speakers of English. This is also in line with Trimnell (2005), that LF is useful
only for simple ideas rather than for use in a professional context. Being university
students, our subjects have professional aspirations. Edwards (2001:11) said, “Languages
of wider communication (i.e. LF) have no special linguistic capabilities to recommend
them, but they are simply the varieties of those who have power and prestige.” It means
that LF users reject SE as models for their own productive performance. The students also
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added that LF is difficult to hear, thereby interrupts comprehension. This coincides with
Llueda (2004) who embraces the rhetorical value of LF. In sum, whereas Graddol (1997 in
Mackey 2002:10) noted that while the status of SE is changing worldwide, the status of SE
is unchanged in culturally conservative Japan.
e) What are their views about the use of the Direct Method in English class?
Few students in this study had experienced the direct method and most were uncertain in
answering this question. The students who supported the method saw the opportunity to
practice English in class. Further, our students highlighted in this context that grammatical
competence and native-norm of pronunciation is important to them. However, on a
practical level, in this method, proficient students tend to dominate the class, whereas a
majority of students is reluctant to speak English. Finally, the data showed that the students
think that the method is suitable for learners with higher motivation. We conclude that the
usefulness of the method depends on age, level of proficiency and personality, and the
level of motivation. Consequently, the method was not favoured by several of our
participants. Among the citations that I reviewed so far, Japanese commentators did not
mention this topic.
Comparison with international researchers (e.g. Schunk et al. 2008) shows that the students
with higher motivation wish to improve their productive skills. This method is used on the
premise that L1 and L2 acquisition is based by the same principles (Krause 1916). On the
background of the impracticalities, this premise may not be shared in Japanese society.
f) What are their views about the EFL goal to communicate in the native speakers‟
norm and the question of grammatical versus communicative language learning?
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There was a great divergence of the students‟ views on this question. As for the goal, a
majority of the students wish to learn Standard English as we saw above. This coincides
with Mackenzie‟ view (2010) that most Japanese university students prefer to learn
native-norm of English. Similarly, Zhour (2009:31) investigated Asian EFL learners in a
Canadian university and reported that Asian students‟ prime goal in her study is to improve
syntactic and lexical knowledge to convey precise meaning in writing. From the Japanese
commentators‟ views, Hashimoto (2004) and Takahashi (2004:11) support the
communicative approach at Japanese school, while Kobayashi, (2001) supports focusing
on linguistic knowledge.
Our findings are congruent with Sercu (2000:29) that Standard English is more suited for
comprehension. It may mean that miscommunication might arise from language ambiguity
in the communicative approach. Rubio, Passey, and Campbell (2004:163) noted,
„Communicative drills are divergent because they allow more than one correct answer, and
they require attention to the stimulus in order to provide a validate response.‟ Then, Lieg
(2009) investigating the Japanese university students‟ perceptions, reported that the
communicative approach failed to produce adequate linguistic competence in Japan, which
coincides with Kavanagh (2012) who denoted that “CLT is a western concept and this may
make it unsuitable for Asian learners.” Some of our data supports this opinion, as one
student said, “Most Asian students were reserved in class.
、アジア人の人はあまり主張をしないという
一般的イメージがあって。(Ms. Za) ”
g) What are their views about the relation between Language skills and
national interests?
Phillipson (1992) pioneered the idea that English proficiency has a significant impact on
national interests and primarily benefits native speaking countries by giving them access to
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global markets. Most of our participants disagreed with this notion of linguistic
imperialism, pointing out that English proficiency is not a main factor in national power.
Referring to GDP as parameter of national power, one student said that high economic
development Japan has come about without high English skills, but because other social
forces (e.g. diligence) have become enablers. Some students claimed that they share the
benefit of English for global communications, which disagrees with Suzuki‟s (1999 in
Rivers, 2012:253) writing, “Japanese are learning English with an inferior complex.”
Matsuoka, et al. (2012) said in a conference that she feels linguistically inferior towards
Caucasians, while Ohta (1993:226) explained „The Law of Inverse Returns‟ that some
people might not be able to cope with ethnic diversity in Japan. For this, a bilingual student
in our study stated that English has more vocabulary to express feelings, which is in
agreement with Tanizaki (2011:55) who ascribes communicative apprehensions among
Japanese people to a smaller number of lexicons compared to English or Chinese
languages. I observed that there are no Japanese commentators on this issue.
Likewise, a student posits that English proficiency is important for Japan to stand up for
itself and for national security in light of growing conflicts with regional countries and this
is fully in line with the argument of Canagarajah (in Cherrington 2004:362), who observes
that learners in Sri Lanka resist the impositions of LI and use English to their own ends.
This is a point neither Japanese nor other commentary and theorists have debated while our
subjects were aware of the impact of EIL on the global society. It showed this concerns
which need to be taken more seriously.
This concludes the discussion of the answers to the first question, which addressed
students‟ general views on what many practitioners see as efficient methods of learning. I
saw a considerable engagement with the question on this level, which in itself is a
significant phenomenon. The second question was on their views of current practice in
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Japanese classrooms, and in particular on their experience thereof.
Main Research Question 2: What experiences do Japanese students have in EFL?
h) What are their views about the perceived low level of Japanese students‟ language
skills?
Researchers, some of whose work was referred to in Chapter II, (Chujo and Nishigchi.
2003, Takahashi 2004, Gottlieb 2008, Seargeant 2008, Stewart, 2009, Sullivan and Schatz
2009) explained that, despite favourable attitudes towards learning English, the Japanese
students‟ English proficiency (e.g. TOEFL score) is consistently low. In this study, the
students‟ views were mixed. Some were defensive, while others agreed with the
proposition. Some argue with the validity of international comparisons. Gottlieb
(2008:10-11) noted, “Japan remains largely monolingual ...except for the instrumental use
of English for other language speakers.” Overall, the data are in keeping with the analysis
of Iino (2010), who reported a split in public Japanese reception of English between
perceived (economic) opportunity and (cultural) threat.
i) What are the students‟ self-perceived levels of, their attitudes towards, and their
opportunities for learning English?
The participants‟ self-assessed proficient skills are illustrated in the appendix. This
illustrated that writing is the most challenging EFL endeavour at school. This finding is
also congruent with Fisher, et al. (2010:1) and Kellogg (2008) that writing is the most
difficult and the most demanded skill in higher education. This study also revealed that
students with high proficiency experienced family support, a positive environment, or a
positive classroom atmosphere. As we had seen in Chapter II, the findings of motivation
studies are inconsistent. It means that motivation is not a sole filter through which learners
perform in EFL classes.
237
Among Japanese commentators, Saito and Ebsworth (2008:115) found that ESL learners in
the U.S. and EFL learners in Japan found listening skills the least proficient, while Sasaki,
et al. (1996) and Saegusa, et al. (1988) noted that listening and writing skills are very
challenging for the Japanese student. For writing content, this study revealed that Japanese
students‟ writing experience is narrow - namely writing for the goal of entrance
examination, such as translation or summary of short stories, which demands syntactic and
semantic precision without conveying own ideas in writing. Nevertheless, the students in
this study agreed with Watanabe (1996) that the goals of university entrance exams benefit
the students‟ English skills in later days. Undoubtedly, this study reported that a key goal of
EFL at Japanese school is syntactic accuracy in productive skills. In addition, this study
revealed that the male students struggled with their handwriting of the alphabet at an early
stage of learning. For this, Tolchinksy (2001 in Fisher et al. 2010:5) illustrated that
understanding of words, word spacing, and recognizing word boundaries are not easy for
early learners. Finally, in contrast to some researchers (Mackenzie, 2010, Schatz et al.
2007, McVeigh 2004), most students in this study had positive attitudes toward the global
use of English due to usefulness of English in academic and in their lives.
j) How did the students learn these skills?
This study illustrated that the environment where the students developed their proficient
skills depended on opportunities, which appeared to vary widely. For example, our data
shows that the students said from their experience that the British international school
focused on reading skills and required good oral skills for admission, while the American
international school offered ESL for non-native speaking students. The data showed that
the early learners who achieved good listening skills had both aural and graphic input
while the early learners with lower listening skills used only aural input. This result
coincides with Bailey and Nunan (1997:265).
238
With respect with other Japanese commentators, the interpretation of Tsuchiya and
Matsukata (2004) is similar that reading and listening influence each other. Then, Hamada
(2012), Tsuchiya et al. (2008), and Yanezaki, et al. (2012) supporting effective use of
„shadowing‟ for listening and specking.
Concerning reading, this study showed that intensive reading and oral reading practices
integrated all four skills. A number of researchers (Yonezaki and Ito, 2012; Beglar, Hunt
and Kite, 2011; Hunt and Kite 2011; Fleming and Steven 2010; Gibson 2008; Kadota
2007, Tsuchiya and Matshara 2002; Smith, 2004; Mori 2004; Kitajima 1997) endorse the
role of reading.
Referring to speaking, this study demonstrated that students thought their oral skills were
essentially established outside school, mentioning hosting exchange students at their
homes, attending private Juku, and participating in overseas exchanges.
Referring to international research, this study is consistent with Fisher et al. (2010:8-9) that
productive skills are essentially cultivated by creating opportunities outside school such as
collaborative experiences of writing and reading.
This study also brought out some interesting questions about gender. Female students had
more desire to use English in unfamiliar environments, while male students worried more
about writing, which is supported by MacIntyre and Baker (2002:558) who noted that,
regardless of their English proficiency, girls are more extroverted in speaking, and
Bartram (2010: 49) saying that boys prefer writing.
239
In sum, this study found that; 1) speaking and writing are equally challenging; and 2)
reading materials and the amount of reading affects reading rate. This study raised the
awareness to the author that there might be some correlation between the textbooks
content and the students‟ motivation, but this question was not addressed to students.
k) What type of English skills do the students further want to learn?
This study showed that goal of English study in Japan is split between communicative
skills and the passing of university exams. Firstly, the majority of the students wish to
improve their productive skills (i.e. writing, speaking). Concurrently, the students in our
study wish to learn grammatical precision at school. As mentioned earlier, this agrees with
Japanese researchers Matsuura, Fujita, and Mahoney (2004:477) and Takahashi (2004:7),
noting that speaking and listening are priorities, while international researchers Bailey and
Nunan (1997:265)‟ participants identified listening skill as a major concern. Some students
explained that there is no contradiction here, that communicative competence is congruent
with linguistic knowledge.
Secondly, due to the lack of English exposure in Japan, the students wish to experience
English at school by the effective use of both communicative and grammar-translation
methods.
Thirdly, this study showed that students think that English proficiency is mainly yielded by
reading practices, which is also matches their needs in university exams and which
coincides with Boyle (1984:37)‟ view that there are strong connections between reading
and listening skills. This supports Coder (1981) and Zhou (2009), who noted that English
users must have a common core of English knowledge to deal with communicative
240
situations.
Fourthly, the students suggested increasing shared reading and speaking experiences (e.g.
presentation, debate) at school from earlier age, when their performance is not affected by
reticence in puberty. This is inconsistent with Japanese commentators, who blame personal
traits for low communicative skills. Ushioda (2008:158) contended that Japanese students
lack EFL motivation while Yashima, et al. (2004: 143) wrote that low self-confidence
interferes with communicative skills
Finally, the students want to improve English skills without being hindered by fear of
mistakes. I could not identify any reference for this question.
l) What kind of change do the students want in EFL?
The students desire changes in EFL, which improve their pronunciation, their writing, their
ability to state their opinion clearly, and improve their vocabulary. They hope that all of
these changes would improve their communicative, which they as a driver of their careers.
They said in particular that the vocabulary of English textbooks in Japan is insufficient for
their needs in the entrance exams and suggested textbook renewal. Among the Japanese
commentators, this is consistent with Chujo and Nishigaki (2003) claimed that the
difference of vocabulary size between size between Japanese English textbooks and
TOEIC requirements is about one thousand words. The following section will summarize
the main findings of our study.
3. Summary
The subjects had well-formed ideas about English learning. Hereafter, I will present a
241
variety of factors that, in the view of the learners interviewed, contribute to outcomes of
English learning.
a) The linguistic competence is viewed as a salient feature of communicative competence.
In particular, our data indicate that, at least in the Japanese environment, communicative
competence requires linguistic precision.
b) There are socio-cultural factors particular to Japan, e.g. reticence, which might affect the
national security. This is an interesting comment from a student of international relations.
c) The English curriculum at junior high school demands more than is possible from the
students‟ learning abilities in the given time. For instance, the students struggle with
writing Latin phonetic letters. In contrast, elementary school could be used more efficiently
for EFL.
d) Teaching English as a lingua franca (LF) did not gain acceptance. The reasons are:
Japanese culture values accuracy; there are no LF speakers, which form role models.
e) Oral reading practice leads to improvement in reading, speaking and listening. A lack of
English exposure leads the students to learn from books only.
f) Communicative skills should be the final product of EFL and developed by the
integration of lanague skills with the opportunity to use English outside school.
g) The study highlighted that individual differences are the most powerful determiner in
developing English proficiency.
h) Error- correction in class is seen as intimidating, in particular by beginners and in large
classes. It requires teachers‟ situational judgment.
i) EFL does not work in the way that L1 acquisition does. This is due to lack of time and is
shown by the lack of acceptance of the monolingual method and of the direct method.
j) English-only instruction improves some skills (e.g. pronunciation)
k) The monolingual method is suited more for younger learners and the students with
higher proficiency.
l) The direct method is effective for students with high proficiency.
242
m) „Linguistic Imperialism‟ is not seen as a threat here. It may need to take into account
specific national socio-cultural factors.
n) Intercultural knowledge is not a prerequisite of English study, whilst motivation is a
prerequisite to develop productive skills.
o) There is a keen interest in and awareness of EFL issues in Japan. Our data may serve in
reassessing English education in Japan.
In the final analysis, our subjects wish to communicate with the world in English, but have
difficulty developing individual study methods. Hereafter, we come back to the outset of
our investigation.
4. Conclusions
This section will conclude the study and present the student voice in order to consider what
the implications might be for MEXT.
4. 1. Instruction
Perhaps due to the absence of the communicative approach, there is a lack of experience in
Japanese school to present ideas in speaking and writing. Regarding English models,
Lingua Franca in its hybrid forms lacks intelligibility. Consequently, a majority of the
students preferred to learn SE. English-only instruction was questioned because of a lack
of readiness on the part of students, teachers, and of the education system. Error-correction
in class would diminish students‟ willingness to use English
4. 2. Teachers (NETs and NNETs)
The attractiveness of teachers lies in their immediacy, linguistic competence, compatible
personality, and experience. Secondly, this study demonstrated that an important role of
243
teachers is to guide students through the flexible use of the teaching materials, which
evoke learners‟ interests and meet goals and needs.
4. 3. Starting age
This study showed that: the starting age factor is related to the time duration factor of
English study. The latter helps learners to develop positive attitudes toward English study
and English speaking communities. However, early learning itself does not necessary yield
English skills.
4. 4. L1 use in class
Instruction in L1 offers opportunity to students with a variety of proficiency levels and
accurate comprehension of the learning context.
4. 5. MEXT reforms and further recommendations resulting from this
study
The rapid process of globalization has led the Japanese government (i.e. MEXT) to
conduct repeated EFL curriculum reforms, which regulate starting age, mode of
instruction, materials, and learning goals for English study. Reflecting on an evaluation of
the curriculum reform of the year 2003, a new Course of Study has been implemented in
April 2011. Hereafter, the author summarizes the MEXT‟ evaluation and the new action
plan (2011) and the results of this study through a comparison analysis.
1) MEXT (2011) argued that the MEXT‟ curriculum reform in 2003 did not yield
significant gains in students‟ English proficiency. MEXT (2011) explicated the plausible
reasons for this: First, the number of learners who enjoy English study dropped from 60
percent in the first year of junior high school to less than 50 percent in the third year of
junior high school: Second, only about one-third of the students (32 percent of the
third-year junior high school students and 30 percent of senior high school students)
achieved the MEXT‟ target scores in Testing English Proficiency (ibid.: 4): Third, the
number of the students studying abroad is at a low (ibid.: 6).
244
This has led MEXT to a new plan (2011) that includes: (i) every public school teaches
English from fifth grade, (ii) English lessons are increased by 30 percent in junior high
school (ibid.: 3).
(1) This study showed that, although early learning would provide some benefits for
motivation, starting age per se would not necessarily develop English fluency.
(2) This study showed that, the students require teachers with adequate English
proficiency.
(3) This study supports MEXT‟s (ibid.: 8) argument that NETs should play larger roles in
teaching rather than just being assistant teachers. According to our data, NETs should
communicate with students inside and outside classroom on a personal level.
(4) MEXT (2011) reassessed teaching materials. Firstly, MEXT decided to focus more on
four skills rather than speaking. MEXT is considering the effective use of digital textbooks
and teaching aids to increase students‟ interests in class. Kadoyama (2012) pointed out that
these did not have significant impact on the achievement of English proficiency. One of the
problems is the need to learn the Roman alphabet, and referring to Constanzo (2009) and
Fishers et al. (2009) who noted that oral skills and writing are closely connected and useful
for collaborative learning, the author recommends using the Roman alphabet for reading
and writing practice of works at elementary level. MEXT decided to improve textbooks at
junior and senior high schools. The participants in this study agreed that textbooks are
boring. Berger, Hunt, and Kite (2011:27) said, “Few researchers are concerned with the
effect of extensive reading on L2 fluency.” They (2011:27) further claimed that pleasure
reading improves the reading rate more than intensive reading.
245
(5) As to medium of instruction, MEXT (2011:9) decided to increase monolingual
instruction in higher education, whereas students in junior and senior high school focus on
syntax and semantics. This study suggested that Japanese students lack instruction in
exploratory writing. This is in agreement with Young (in Bailey and Nunan 1993: 273)
that Japanese students need more instructions in writing and speaking.
In sum, the problems underling EFL at Japanese schools include a lack of time, a large size
of class, inappropriate textbook content, and a lack of intrinsic motivation and writing
experience. The finding is congruent with Chujo et al. (2003:16) that EFL material (in
particular vocabulary) at schools is insufficient to improve English proficiency. This study
showed that learners need to expand their opportunities to learn English and practice them
outside school to improve their English skills.
Further, mere exposure to L2 would not develop English proficiency. The data indicated
that, as one student said, one of the important goals of English study might be to develop
critical and logical thoughts through reading and writing practices through L2 learning.
Finally, this study questioned the low English standard in Japan. This belief is said to be a
matter of failure anxiety or poor self-image in the face of high expectation of achieving
fluency and accuracy in oral skills. The students suggested that it is important to change
this narrow belief in low English standards in Japan to eradicate the effects of negative
prophesies.
5. Limitations of the study
The data presented in this study were collected from a small number of the students at
three elite metropolitan universities. The author believes that investigating EFL in Japan
246
from a larger and more inclusive group are needed for a more detailed review of the issues
facing EFL in Japan but this exploratory study has given a voice to students which could
be extended with other methods in the future.
6. Reflection
“Quidquid agis, prudenter agas et respice finem”
Whatever you do, do cautiously, and consider the end.
Latin proverb
Having reached the end of my thesis, I have learned the value of a systematic and logical
approach to teaching and learning. In an issue at the crossroads of culture, language,
history, and communication that is heatedly debated and highly emotional, I have
attempted to contribute evidence-based insights at a very specific and narrowly defined
level. This attempt was new to my experience. As learner and teacher in Japan and
Thailand, I became increasingly aware of the critical issues in EFL investigated here.
However, I have not thought it possible to purposefully reflect on them. As a teacher, I
have learned the importance of adapting to the culture of communication of the learners.
As a (re)searcher, I have learned how difficult is to gain and justify conclusions from live
data, while being impressed and humbled by the openness and awareness of the
interviewees I encountered.
247
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Appendices
273
Appendix 1
Interview questions for the pilot study
Questions
Interview question
1. “The earlier English is a) At what age did you start learning English?
taught, the better results
b) How long have you been learning English?
would arise (Phillipson,
1992)”
2. What are EFL a) What is your purpose of English study?
motivations
of
the
1. academic requirement,
students?
2. communication,
3. self-development,
Communicative skills in
4. carrier development tool,
English
a. b)
What b) What are your goals of English study?
(Howatt et al.,
2004:
379).
b.
c) What English skills (reading, writing, listening,
speaking) are important for you?
c.
d) Do you intend to study English after your
graduation?
3. The goal of English What kind of Englishes do you want to learn?
study is to interact with
native English speakers.
a) Do you use large scale of corpora?
The global spread of
English and its impacts
on education
4.
Potential e)
influences of the global
use of English on EFL
and culture (Howatt et
al., 2004: 379).
5.
“English is best
taught
mono-lingually
(Phillipson, 1992)”
“Instruction
autonomy
in
(Howatt et al.
379)”
b) What kind of EFL materials do you use at
school?
Do you think that English-speaking countries enjoy
more benefits from the global spread of English than
non-native English speaking countries?
What do you think of English – only instruction at
EFL classes?
a) What is your opinion about the uses of L1 and
translation in EFL? Is it more helpful or hindrance?
and
b) Which do you prefer the communicative
EFL
2004:
approach or the grammar-translation method at
school?
6. “The ideal English Do you have any experiences of learning English
teacher is a native from both NT and NNT?
speaker
(Phillipson,
a) Which of the two do you prefer?
1992).”
274
b) Do you think that having a NT influence the
The
strengths
and
outcomes of the learning process?
weakness NETs and
NNETs
instruction
(Howatt et al. 2004: 379)
7. What
are
the What are your feelings about English speaking
students‟ perceptions of countries?
English
speaking
Psychologists today recognize that culture
countries?
influence cognitive development. For example,
how children would learn about the world
(Woolfolk et al. 2008:52).
7. What are the students‟ When you face a success or a failure, to what do you
attributions
in
their tend to attribute your results? For example,
success and failure?
a) I tend to ascribe the result of my study to my
ability.
b) Do you agree that your ability is limited or
continue to grow?
c) I tend to blame my failure toward myself or
environments (e.g. teacher)
8. What changes would 1. Do you have any suggestions to improve learning
you suggest to make
and teaching of English inside and outside school?
English teaching and
2. Do you have any good memory of NETs and
learning better?
(e.g. myself, or in the NNETs or any images of good English teachers?
learning environment)
275
Appendix 2 Pilot study details
DS= Durham University student, TY= Teikyo University students, F. = female, M. = male,
Interview
Participants
Duration & Location
Date
Academic discipline,
Place and Time were chosen by the
Overseas experience
interviewee
and length of stay in the Points of emphasis
UK
8thMay 2010 DS: F. 1 Humanity (60 min at a common room at the dormitory)
(MA),
The student has a working experience at a
an individual Life in US during
publishing company in Japan before MA
interview
summer vacation
study in archaeology. She said that Japanese English translation used at a language school
DS: M. Science (MA)
Bilingual
students,
lived in UK since 8,
and studied physics at
Durham university.
was helpful to improve English skills.
(60 min at the restaurant near the main
library.)
The student has lived in UK since 8 years old
with his family. He taught English to Japanese
students on his summer holiday in Japan.
TY, a female & a male
freshmen,
majoring
an interview Foreign language study,
with
two arrived to UK two
students
months ago
24 May 2010 TY.
M
Majoring
an individual Economics. Arrived to
the UK two month ago
interview
and had four overseas
From this, this bilingual student recognized
that teaching English is not easy and wishes
to learn how to teach English.
(80 min at a fast-food restaurant)
They wanted to start studying English earlier.
More English better. Those two students
strongly supports strength of NT.
(70 min. at Teikyo University)
The student recognized these days that;
English is useful in daily life and wish that
English education will be promoted. Recently,
15 May 2010
an
individual
interview
16 May 2010
June Focus group interview
One Durham university
2010
student & three Teikyo
university students (two
a focus group
males and one female)
interview
and a male student
he recognized the usefulness of English for
self-development. He recommends starting
EFL earlier.
(50 min at the garden of Teikyo University)
Three students from Teikyo and a male
student from Durham met in the garden at
Teikyo-Shoichi Hall. All students accepted
this group-interview request on requested day
(i.e. after each individual interview). Revised
from
Durham
university in interview
2),
3)
and
4)
consecutively.
interview questions were tested and found
that some question were difficult to draw
answers (e.g. 2-7). It revealed that, at onset of
an interview, introduction of EFL theories
trip experiences.
29th
276
Total 4 students
would be potential source of leading
questions. Interview method was helpful to
provide a diversity of students‟ views and
experiences (e.g. Attribution of failures).
Most of the students attributed their success
to people (parents, teachers, and sport) rather
than their own efforts. Their common
experience to live in Durham created a
friendly atmosphere to have a successful
interview.
277
Appendix 3: Research questions for the main study
Research question (Academic form )
Interview questions ( Vernacular form)
1. EFL Principles
a) What do you think about learning
1 a)
“English is best taught monolingually
English by using only English
(Phillipson, 2002)”
Language?
b) Is L1 usage and translation helpful or
hindrance in English classes?
3.
What type of English dictionary do
you use?
1
1 b)
The ideal EFL teacher is a native
speaker
2
Do you have EFL experience from
NTs?
How did you learn English from
NETs?
3
What are the strengths and weaknesses
of leaning English from NNTs and
NNTs?
4. Which of the two do you prefer?
1. Do you think that if all students began
1 c)
“The earlier English is taught, the better studying English in elementary school,
the result ”
English proficiency in Japan would be
better than today?
1 d)
1.
1. Do you think that a goal of EFL would
“English should be taught as a Lingua be to learn to communicate with NSs or
Franca
(LF)
for
international with NNSs?
communication (EIL)”
1 e)
1. What do you think of EFL with only
“English should be taught through English instruction?
the medium of English in a direct
method”
1. What kind of English do you want to
1 f)
learn?
English is essentially learnt to interact
For example, Standard English or LF
with the native speakers of the language.
c) Do you think Japan is losing the
1 g)
English as a world language affect
278
national power.
national power because of the global
spread of English?
1.f)
1
What are Japanese students‟ views about
their language skills?
What do you think of Japanese
students‟ language skills in general?
2
What do you think of your English
proficiency?
3
What is your achievement in English
study?
3. What are your levels of English skills?
4. What do you think you can do in
English wills?
reading
in
communicating
E.g., you enjoy
English,
with
media,
people
or
with
different cultures in English.
2.
Please tell me about your English learning
What kinds of experiences do Japanese
experience. For example, starting age of
students have in EFL classes?
EFL, the place of learning, your attitudes
toward EFL.
1.
When did you start learning English?
2.
How long have you been studying
English?
3.
Why did you start learning English?
4.
What kind of EFL experience do you
have before entering schools?
5.
How did you learn English at school?
6.
How did you learn English outside
classroom?
7. What kind of experience do you have
for EFL at school and at home?
8.
Do you have any negative EFL
experience?
9. What kind of efforts are you making to
improve your EFL?
279
10. How do you enjoy your EFL?
11. What is your level of satisfaction in
EFL classes?
12. What is your level of achievement in
English study?
13. Are you going to continue English
study after university graduation?
Environment
How do you use English in your daily life?
1.
When do use English?
2.
Where do you use English?
3.
With whom do you use English?
4.
How do you use English?
280
Appendix 4
Invitation to the research on students‟ EFL experiences
Dear Students,
I hope your summer is pleasant one and your campus life is enjoyable...
I am a graduate school student at school of education in University of Durham. The focus
of my study is learning English as a foreign language (EFL). My study is motivated
because of the belief that, language learning is complex due to multiple reasons, which are
interwoven, by teaching methods, individual characteristics and culture in language
learning. The goal of my study is to draw some implication to EFL in Japanese classes.
Today, Japanese media/researchers report the English learning situations in Japan as
problematic and this worry about English in Japan is evident from public concern and from
government policy documents. The aim of this research is to understand students‟ EFL
experiences and their views on some important EFL principles commonly found in the
debates on English in Japan. I believe that students‟ experience and observation are
inevitable to understand the situation and improve EFL in Japan.
I would like to invite you to participate in this study. The method of the investigation
is individual interviews and focus group interviews. Your understanding of this study and
participation is highly appreciated. If you have any inquiry or comment on this research,
please feel free to contact me.
Cordially
Shigeo Shimazu
E-mail address. [email protected] (In Japanese or in English)
281
Appendix 5
Consent Form 同意書
Japanese students‟ EFL experience: the role of student voice
日本の英語教育体験
1. Have you had an opportunity to ask questions and to discuss the study?
Yes,
No.
Yes,
No.
Yes,
No.
Yes,
No.
リサーチの目的について、質問をする機会がありました。
2. Have you had a satisfactory answer to all of your questions?
十分なご説明が得られました。
3. Have you had enough information about the study?
リサーチの説明が十分なされました。
4. Do you consent to participate in the study?
インタビューに参加していただけますか。
5. Do you consent to use of the tape recording to the described study?
Yes,
No.
(All of the context are used for academic purposes and will be destroyed when the project
is completed.)
テープレコーダーを使ってもよろしいですか。(録音内容は本研究の目的だけに使
わせていただき、すべて記録は研究が終わり次第、抹消いたします。)
6. Do you understand that you are free to withdraw from the study at any time? Yes
No.
インタビューをいつでも辞退できます。
ご協力を頂き、ありがとうございます。
Date.
お名前:Name in the block letter.
282
Appendix 6: Interview transcription
4) Mr. Ha: Interviewed on 2nd September 2010 at PM1:30 in the University Campus
Name : Mr. Ha
Contact address:
1. Gender :
1.Male
2.
Grade
1.BA( 4th year )2.MA
3.
Subject Discipline
1. Science (electric information science )
2. Female
2. Humanity (
4. Location
of
junior
high Chiba Pref
of
senior
high Chiba Pref.
),
3. PHD
3. others (
)
school
5. Location
school
6. Type of high school
1. National, 2. Public,
Overseas living experience
3.
private
1.yes ( from years old to years old、) in ( country)
2. Nil
7. Self-assessment of English Writing:(excellent, good average, unsatisfactory)
Reading:(excellent, good average, unsatisfactory)
proficiency
Listening:(excellent, good average, unsatisfactory)
Speaking:(excellent, good average, unsatisfactory)
8. The first contact/use English
1. since I was born
2. 1-3 years old.
3. kindergarten
4. elementary school
5. junior high school,
9.
When
English
to
start
learning Mr. Ha began learning English at junior high school as
a compulsory subject.
10. Fluency to use English in Before entering university ( NIL )
daily life
After entering university ( NIL )
a) Nil , b) a few times a year,
c) a few times a month,
d) every day
11. Travelling experience to 1.Nil 2. Yes (
)
English speaking countries.
12. Trip to foreign countries
1.Nil 2. Yes (
283
)
4)Mr. Ha, final transcription on 26th January 2011. Interview day:
Sep. 2nd 2010
Travel
I have spent all my life in まったく国内向きで、外国なんて
という感じです。
Japan.
国内の旅行があります。
I have not been aboard.
全くなしです。
I travel only in Japan.
I have not lived aboard.
University Study
I study acoustic engineering
supervised by Prof. M and
am working to develop a
phonological device.
電子音声学所属で、M 先生のとこ
My research project has not
started yet.
I decided to major in
“Sound” by coincidence.
I enjoy music and I could not
major in music. So, I
switched to the study of
sound.
具体的な研究がまだ始まっていま
EFL in primary school It is rather a difficult
小学校などでどんな英語 question to answer.
を日本で習ったらいいで I think if I had more
しょうか。
dictation and shadowing
What kind of English do you practices in English classes,
want to learn in Primary my
English proficiency
school?
would be better than now.
It is rather hypothetical
answer.
うーーん、やはり、これとは言え
I have not had English
いつ頃から英語にふれま exposure at all in my daily
したか。
life.
When did you first have I begin to feel that I need to
English exposure for the first study English now.
time?
I began studying English at
junior high school.
いやーー。いまでも英語は全くふ
勉強は?
What do you study at the
university?
きっかけは?
Why did you choose to study
the subject?
4 minutes
EFL at first
ろで音声に関することを研究して
います。なんらか音声のことに関
して勉強しています。
せん。
余りないです。惰性で。
音楽が好きだったので、音楽関係
がいいなーと思っていたんです
が、成績の問題で望んだ所へ行け
なかったので、音関係に行きまし
た。
ないと思うんですけど、これとは
言えなくて、これは自分のスタイ
ルとしてですけど、もう尐し時間
をかけてもっと Dictation とか
shadowing を典型的な練習をもっ
と小さい頃からやっていたらもう
尐しましな英語にあっていたか、
はてなはてなと思います。
れていないので、そろそろ積極的
にふれないといけないかなーと思
っていますが。というレベルなの
です。
中学校一年生です。
Juku
I also did not attend English いいえ、英語はやっていませんで
その前に塾とかに行かれ
した。
Juku.
I began studying English at
junior high school.
ましたか。 Did you attend
Juku?
EFL at junior high Yes, it was the first time that はい、”This is a pen.”からです。そ
284
I studied English when I れと “I am...”とかです。
中学一年生から初めて英 entered to the junior high
school
語にふれたのですか。
Then, you learned English at
junior high school for the first
time.
school.
The first lesson began
learning the be-verb. For
example, “This is a pen.”
and “I am ...”
I was not interested in 教科書は^^。ちょっと学校の勉
教科書はどんなのを使わ English study and I do not 強は疎かにしていたので、学校の
れていましたか。What kind remember the content of the 教科書はさっぱり覚えていませ
Text book
of textbooks did you use?
school textbooks.
ん。
8 minutes
I attended Sundai Yokoko and
塾の教科書は?
I studied English there as
What kind of textbook in Yobiko did well.
you use?
The Yobiko focused on
亓文型ですか。
English grammatical such as
Five sentence patters to learn?
“I, MY ME ME”. The
その時は先生中心のじゅ textbook at Yobiko did not
駿台予備校へ行ったので、そこで
ぎ ょ う で す か 。 Teacher
亓文型は最初にやりました。
Yobiko
focus on communicative
centred?
contents.
何人位ですか。
Yobiko
focused
on
How many students in a class?
grammatical
knowledge,
どのように授業がすすみ reading and writing.
ましたか。How did you learn? There
were nearly 30
日本人でしたか。NNET? students in a class.
10 minutes
It
was
teacher-cantered
instruction.
Instructors there were NETs.
の予備校の教科書が主だったんで
す。
それは、一般の教科書のように会
話から始まるのではなくて、いき
なり文法から始めました。I my
me.とか。
文法中心でした。
普通の読み書き中心でした。
30 人ぐらい
うーーん
まー解説はしてました。
先生の言葉で教科書を解説をす
るという典型的なものでした。
はい、日本人でした。
When I attended summer 夏期講習とかそういうのを受けた
時は NET でした。
Experience of native courses, we had NNETs.
English
teachers
at We had pair teaching at 学校は会話時間に NET がありま
した。日本人の先生がついていま
Yobiko
school as well.
NNT の先生の経験は?
If budget were available, it した。
Did you learn English by NETs?
would be ideal to have both
学校はいかがでしたか。 NETs and NNETs in a class.
予算があれば、日本人の先生と
II -2
NET or NNET
Because NNETs would help
Pair Teaching について students
to
improve
どう思いますか。
comprehensions.
Then,
What do you think of pair students do not fall into
How did you enjoy the EFL?
285
NET とお二人いた方がいいです。
できればそれでいいのでしょうけ
ど、NET の方が日本語を話せない
と、会話が理解できなくなった時
に自分で対処がどうにもできなく
panic.
teachings?
NT と NNT とどちらが
なった時、一生懸命、向こうがわ
いいですか。
からせよとしても、パニックにな
Which do you prefer to learn
って、判らないと困ります。
English by NETs or NNETS?
NET at school
NET は日本語ができま
NETs
したか。NET speak English?
some Japanese.
were able to speak 片言ができました。
日本語を話しましたか。
Can he speak Japanese?
使いましたか。
Used
はい。
However, they did not speak はい。
ないです。
Japanese in the classroom.
Japanese?
the At the university, we had 英語の授業はたまにあった事はあ
りました。
several English courses.
今、英語の授業はありますか。
English courses were over in
English
university
at
Do you have course of study in
summer in senior year.
四年の夏休みで終わりました。
English now?
I did not take any courses in そういう授業はありましたが、全
ますか。How about EFL? English.
て避けました。
現在は英語の授業はあり
UG で専科の科目で英語
だけの授業がありました
か。
I use internet for past - time ー遊びと情報収集です。
イ ン タ ー ネ ッ ト の 手 段 and data collection.
Internet Use
は?
Japanese mobile phone is
What is your purpose to use quite reasonable and is quite
internet?
practical.
日本は携帯で通信をして Many people use mobile
い る 人 が 多 い よ う で す phone text.
が。
Cost for mobile phone is not
Many people seem to use mobile that high.
携帯の情報交換が極めて高機能で
phone for communication in Japan.
帯電話は使うほど高くなりますか
コスト的にはどちらが高
ら。
いですか。
Which is more expensive?
286
す。
一般的には携帯が多いです。自分
は携帯はあまり使わないです。
コスト的にはインターネットの方
が安いと思っています。インター
ネットは一定料金なのですが、携
I do not recall any good なんかその、特に楽しいとか悲し
英語の授業の中で良い nor bad memory in English いとか言うはなかったです。
Good EFL memory
思い出は?
classes.
memory in EFL?
I remember that a story of
なにか英語の授業で思い “Mother Teresa” appeared in
出すことは?
the junior high school
Do you have any memory in EFL textbook in my second year.
class?
Mother Teresa was also a
name of a popular Nintendo
game.
Zkai
is
Do you have good
one
of
the
famous
correspondence juku for jyuken.
Everyone knew the name
because of the game
software.
Then, when Mother Teresa
appeared in the textbook, I
thought it as a game hero.
昔、中二ぐらいの時に読まされ
た本で、マザーテレサのお話があ
って、当時はマザーテレサを知ら
なかったんです。ご存知かどうか
わかりませんが。テレサというの
は、
日本人ならだれでもしっている任
天堂のゲームにテレサという有名
なお化けの名前がテレサがあった
んんです。お化けの名前だ思って
勘違いして読んでいたら、人名だ
とわかったのです。
ゼット会の教科書でした。
But I found that it was a
name of a nun.
It was a textbook at Juku. .
Bitter memory of EFL
い や な 思 い で は ? Sad
No, I do not have any 別にないですね。
negative memory either.
memory?
What efforts do you
Recently, I began to feel that
make
to
improve I have to take actions to
English?
improve my English skills.
自分で努力していること I had escaped from this
は。What kind of efforts did you reality.
ないですが、そろそろ努力しなき
I may start studying with
具 体 的 に は ど ん な こ と textbooks- Roberta Stone
を?
series- that are kept in the
What do you do?
research room.
とりあえず、研究室にロベッタス
make for English?
ゃなーと思っていますが、いつも
いつも逃げ続けているのでそろそ
ろやらなきゃなーと思っていま
す。
トーンという有名な英語の教材が
あって、それに手を出そうかと思
っているのです。
My English skill
I do not have any proficient 得意なものがないくらいです。・
ど の ス キ ル が 得 意 で す skills.
率直に言って自分より下はいない
か。
My English proficiency is のではないかと思うぐらいです。
What is your most proficient the lowest in class.
得意なものがないです。
English skill?
20 minutes
Let me see, I think English まー出来ない方だと思います。
日本人が他の国に比べて skills in Japan are relatively 島国という環境と、島国という環
英語ができないと思いま low.
境の中で、一時的にでも経済的成
EFL in Japan
287
すか。
Do you think that Japanese
students‟ English abilities are
lower
than
students
in
non-native English countries
are?
It may be due to the fact that 功を経験したこと島国であること
Japan has achieved economic で閉鎖的ですし、あまり他国と交
success, although for a short
time.
We also feel that we are in
the same boat.
Japan is a homogeneous
country, which make us feel
safe.
Then, we tend to be inward -
流しようとしない。他の国と違っ
rather conservative.
Both the U.K. and Japan are
surrounded by sea, but the
surrounding
environments
are very different.
Japan has achieved economic
いますね。
てとにかく、皆、日本人という意
識があるので。日本人どうして内
戦するよなこともいまではないで
すね。
同じ島国でもイギリスと日本
は大分周囲の環境が違がったと思
一度、経済天国にのぼりつめて、
英語をやらなくてもやってこられ
たから、やはり危機感がないです
ね。
success without English EU に入らないかとか、ま。島国
language skills while, in the だったことということもあると思
U.K. weather to become a いますよ。
member of European Union
or not.
Japan is an island country.
Japanese people are happy in 自分は日本が大好きなのでまーい
Japan and wish our country いんじゃないですか。
would remain the same. It is
OK.
Future in Japan
Mr. Hatoyama reached the まー鳩山さんはみな日本人はねた
これからどうなってほし
top because he is popular
among the public, but most
students in TODAI do not
like him.
いというか。
How would you like to be our
future in Japan?
25 minutes
首相としか思っていなかったと思
います。
一般人には人気がったので、首相
に上り詰めたのでしょうけど、鳩
山さんは正直大半の東大生は好き
でないと思います。
I tried to memorize English 自分は、もう、自然に習得する
単語はどのように増やし words
with
vocabulary ことができなかったのでシステ
ましたか。How did you learn notebooks in a systematic マチックに、そのー、ひたすら
your vocabulary?
英単語とその対語をひたすら丸
manner to my best ability
Vocabulary
単語を覚えるのは辛かっ
たですか。
How did you feel when you are
暗記しました。
How shall I explain…?
Since I did not have あーー(辛いというより)という
environment to learn English より、自然に習得できなかった
288
memorising vocabularies, was it
painful memory?
naturally. Then, I simply ので、英語はひたすら単語帳を
覚えて済ませてしまいました。
have to memorize words.
There are exchange students
英語を使う環境が尐ない in
our research room.
ですが英語はどこで使い Unfortunately, I cannot talk
ま す か 。 Where do you use to them.
English now?
I read academic journals in
English.
どこで使いますか。
My purpose to use English is
Where and how do you use English for academic purposes.
EFL Environment
やっぱり、研究室に外国の方がい
るのに会話が出来ないのにごめん
なさいとか。
もちろん、論文は英語ですので。
それをなくなく読んでいます。
自分が英語を使うのは、論文を読
んだり学問がらみです。
先生とお話します。
For example, I sometimes 機会は論文を読む時とか学問がら
use English to communicate みです。先生とか研究室の人たち
とです。
with my colleagues.
now?
Image of
English Simply, the global spread of
English is a universal social
speaking countries
英語を話す国に対して、 reality. It is too late to master
どう思いますか。 Do you Esperanto.
have any image about English It is natural consequence.
一言でいうなら、仕方ないです
か。
いまさらエスペラント語を覚える
とかそういうのは無理です。まー
その時の事情です。
speaking country?
英語の世界に広がる影響
について。
Why do you think about the global
spread of English?
30 minutes
Mr.
Ha
explained
about
operation system and difficulty
of using Japanese in computer
Do you know “character
code”?
Japanese characters are not
suitable to run a computer
system. For example, there
are operation-systems such
as Window, Max or Linux.
These three OS process
Japanese
differently.
プログラミングも難しいし、
ちょっと難しい話になるんですけ
ど、文字構造ってわかりますか。
あの、パソコンで日本語をうって
文字化けするという現象はどうし
て起こるのでしょうか。
OS
Window とかマックとか他
にも Linux とかいろいろな OS が
language あるのはわかりますか。
それぞれで日本語の処理方法が異
なるのですね。まったく。
system.
Computer system assigns all
alphabets from zero to one
code in numbers in one
megabyte.
English letters A to Z can
be stored within a space of
最終的にはコンピューターはゼロ
one megabyte.
A だったら A から Z まで数字があ
ー1 の数字で表すではないです
か。で、たとえばなんか、最終的
には英語かも一忚アウシという企
画があって数字があって全て割り
当てられているのですね。
るんですよ。表があって A から Z
However, Japanese language まで割り当てられているんです
has too many letters to store よ。
289
それは日本語は、その企画がばら
in one megabyte.
んばらんで。で、そのー、あのー、
English has only 26 letters, if
we include capital letters and
lowercases, it is still possible
to store one megabyte is
enough. 100 including
あともうひとつ違いがあって、そ
れは英語はせいぜいたかだか A か
ら Z までせいぜい26個で、大文
字小文字と記号を入れても 100 に
は行かないので、1 バイトという
単位でたりすんですね。
Therefore, multi-byte, that is 一バイトは、あのー、2の 8 乗な
two to three megabyte, are ので、256とおりの符号が割り当
necessary to store all てられるんですよ。
Japanese
letters.
One
megabit can store 256
characters.
256 are enough for English
writing system but not for
Japanese. Therefore, it is
difficult to store Japanese
texts within in one megabyte.
256 あれば、英語は明らかに足り
It is rather a long story but
Japanese is not computer
friendly simple because we
have
complex
writing
system.
号が大変になるのですよ。ちょっ
る。
日本語は 256 文字ではとても足り
ないではないですか。
だから multibyte といってより符
と長い話すか。
それで、その、日本語の文字を表
すのに、データ帳の中からたくさ
ん必要なんですよ。一バイトでは
足りなくて。
As the result, while one byte なんですけど。だから英語の文章
is enough to store English を表すのにこれ位のデータ量で足
texts in computer system, the
same contents in Japanese
texts requires twice more
space and time for the same
contents.
Once, there were arguments
about its lack of fairness.
りるんですが、日本語の文章をあ
らわす時に、同じ長さでも一文字
あたりの取るデータ量が長いの
で、データ量がとても大きくなっ
てしまうのです。
それで不公平じゃないかという議
論がおこったことがあるんです
よ。
Japanese language requires それで英語だと一バイトですむの
two to three times more に、日本語だと 1 じゃたらなくて、
space than English to store 2バイト、三バイトをとると、一
文字をあらわすのに。
the same contents.
290
Once, this issue
seriously
debated
was なんで、世界の言語どれも共通し
)いう文字
and て使えるシステム(
discussed to make all
language stores in the same
space within the same time.
It means to develop a system
to store every language in
one megabyte, but the
project was failed and
terminated.
構造があるんですけど。その規格
There is no more chance to
make it happens.
NEC had developed an
Operation
System,
but
Microsoft won and Japanese
company gave up developing
する見込みもないです。
の一つで、みな一バイトにしよう
かという企画もあったのですが普
及しなかったのですね。
まー共通して、みんな同じ長さで
世界各国の言葉を現れるように使
用じゃないかという動きがあった
のですが、普及しなかったし普及
日本独自の OS は NEC が作
っていたのですがそれがマイクロ
ソフトに負けて今は完全にないで
すね。多分、国会レベルでは残っ
ているのか残っていないのか。民
間人が営業する中ではないです。
OS.
Operation
system
in おそらくですけど、window がク
Microsoft is not open to ローズというか、OS として提供
public.
There is a doubt that
Microsoft can manipulate PC
system behind the scene.
されているのですが仕組みの仕様
書は公開されてないのです。極端
な 話 、 Window を 使 っ て い て
Microsoft が何をやっているかわ
からない。。。そういうことはある
Linux‟ operation system is わけがないですが、そういう意識
open source and it is possible があるのです。
to
modify the
Linux あるんですよ。それに対してリナ
operation system to fit into ックスは Open Source なのです
ね。基本的に。使用書が断片的に
our own purpose.
作り方などが公開されていて、か
Window operation system is
“black box” and we do not
know
what
Window
company can do.
Computer is large, so in
Linux world, people can use
つ、それを自由にいじれるのです
ね。それをちょこちょこと自分用
に書き換えてしまえば自己満足的
な買い替えができるという。
Window は Black Box なので、
何をしているか判らないと考える
parts of Linux system to 人もいます。
パソコン自体がとても巨大な世界
customize it to their needs.
なので、リナックスの世界では、
Linux
is
different
291
from あれもこれもやると巨大すぎるの
Window or Max because で、一部を持ってきて、一部をも
Linux operation system is ってきて、その目的をもってきて、
opened to customize for
individual purpose.
Have you ever heard about
distribution?
There are many OS which is
based on a Linux system and
the end-users simply switch
on a computer to use the
カスタムメードが出来るんです
customized OS.
This modified version of
Linux operation system
might be categorized as
domestic OS.
う、部分注とか聞いた事があらり
よ。
そういう意味で、リナックスその
物を使うのではなくて、一般の人
は、ある人たちがカスタマイズも
のを使うのですね。
Windows とか Max と違って、リ
ナックスには Distribution とい
ますか。まーend users がつかえ
るように、それぞれ customized
した、普通に personal computer
がパソコンスイッチをいれたら使
えるようにするためにいろいろな
方法がありますて。。。とか。。。が
ありまして。
そういう意味では日本独自の
国産のものがあります。それを国
産 OS とみるかどうかわかりませ
んが。
Japan
41 minutes
Japan is a small country.
The Japanese history shows
that, whenever Japan leads
the world, other countries try
to destroy national power.
Japan has made many
creative products in the past.
In the future, I wish Japanese
society not only affluent in
products, but we have more
spiritual affluence.
I wish if the future computer
system would be for
multi-purposes
i.e.
日本は小さい国なので弱いです
ね。でもそれは大昔からだったの
で。
歴史でも習うと思いますが、日本
が優位になったのものは、何かし
ら理由をつけて潰しにかかるの
で。 それで次から次へと新しいも
のを作ってやってきたので、やっ
ぱ、これからは
次期産業は自分的には、まー、精
神的な豊かさを求めるアイディア
サービス、やっぱり、まー、漫画
とか、アニメとかゲームでも、同
じ娯楽でもコンピュータ的要素を
animation, entertainment and 融合させた、アイデア的な余地が
あったらいいとはと思います。
intellectual purpose as well.
Teaching method
292
1)
method
やはりそれは、その、自分はそ
Monolingual I am not in favor of the
monolingual method. It will ういう考え方は好きじゃないで
widen the gap between fast
辞書はなにを使っていま and slow learners.
すか。What type of dictionary do It would be more harmful
you use?
rather than helpful.
コンコーダンサー。Do you I use an electronic dictionary.
use online dictionary?
I am not familiar with the
online „concordance‟.
2) NETs or NNETs
I think the ideal teacher is
理想の英語の先生は?
NET.
す。そうなると出来る人と出来合
い人が格差が広がるというか、そ
れが危険というかそうなる可能性
があるというか。
電子辞書です。
詳しくないです。
その通りじゃないですか。
はい。
What is the ideal English teacher
Yes, it is better to use both
習う時は日本語と英語を Japanese and English to
つ か っ た 方 が い い で す learn English.
for you?
か。
Do you prefer to use L1 in EFL?
うーーーんと、それもやっぱり、
Let me see,
早ければ早いほどいい? It is difficult…
3) Earlier better?
What do you think of the learning
theory of the earlier the better?
まーーーー、やっぱりーーー、日
After all, Kokugo is the
priory for Japanese school.
It is difficult to study two
languages at one time.
If a student learns two
languages
from
their
childhood,
bilingualism
would be possible.
本語を先にやるべきだと思います
However, if we chase two
houses, we would miss both.
If we learn English and
Japanese, we cannot master
either of them.
It is more important to mater
Kokugo to fully enjoy our
life.
英語も日本語も両方習得できる人
ね。
というのは、やっぱり二つのこと
を同時にやろうとして、できる人
はいいのですが、同じ事をいって
申し訳ないですけど、
日本語と英語を同時に、小さい頃
から、生まれた時からやったら、
が出来るのでしょうけど。どっち
も習得できなくて、大変な事にな
ったら、
人も多くなるので、やはりあれも
これもというとではなく、まーと
りあえず日本を習得して文化的生
活を最低限もとうということが大
事なのではないですか。
Elementary It may have some positive 効果があるんじゃないでしょう
effects. If we draw a chart か。
来年から英語が小学校に for learning, the longer we まー、学習曲線がどうであれ、期
導入されることに着いて study, the better proficiency 間が長ければ長いほど、そりゃー
EFL in
school
293
はどう思いますか。
What do you think of EFL in
有利でいいのではないでしょう
would be.
Time would become an abler か。
elementary school?
for English proficiency.
Grammar translation Let me see, I can study
or
communicative grammar from book at home
by myself. However, oral
approach
skills are difficult to learn
from books. I think it is it is
good to focus on oral skills
at school.
It would be a good way to
日本の学校の中で有効で learn English. But, I think,
しょうか。
the Direct Method would not
Do you think that the direct be feasible because of a lack
methods work at Japanese school?
of readiness among teachers.
From the onset, it requires
52 minutes
teachers‟ training.
グループでやるか、一人 Even if English teachers are
で勉強するかなど。
trained to teach in the Direct
5. The Direct method
Method, students cannot
individual assignments
benefits from it either. For
例えば Discussion、また the communicative approach,
は先生中心の授業。
learners need dialogues.
For example, discussion.
Let me see, after all,
I still
believe that, syntax is not
priority at school.
For
7.
example,
Does
group
work
or
Language Let me say, it is not good to
affect national power?
say inferior or superior to
英語が広がると日本にと describe foreign language
って不利?
skills.
Do you think that spread of English Any country would be the
language work negatively to Japan?
same position.
For example, if Japanese
language would become a
英語が広がっても日本が world language, it is possible
それほど不利ということ that Japan is superior to the
ではないですか。
You consider that the global use of
English may not affect Japanese
interests.
うーーーん。やっぱり文法は人か
ら教わらなくても出来ないじゃな
いですか。家で本を読めば。でも
英会話は難しいのではないです
か。そういうのを学校が重視する
べきではないですか。
ああー、いいと思います。
やはり、人材が足りないじゃない
ですか。小学校からやろうと思う
と。どうしても。英語教師をトレ
ーニングしたところで、日本中の
学校に配置しようと思ったら、全
体のレベルが、それが成り立つレ
ベルかどうか難しいところだと思
います。
総合的なことは授業でやる必要
がないと思います。
なにかしら、マニュアルを作らな
いと。
うーーーん。やっぱり文法的なこ
とはそんなに授業でやる必要がな
いのではないかと。
うーーーん。言い回しで不利とい
うのは、何がなければ不利じゃな
いかということ。他の国だったら
起こりうる事とかもしれません
が。
そりゃ、日本語が世界共通語だっ
たら日本は有利でということじゃ
ないですか。
それだけのことではないでしょ
USA?
うか。
It is not that simple.
Let me see, currently, the まー、特別に日本が不利というこ
USA
might
have
an とはないのではないですか。
294
advantage
because
of
English is used as a world
そりゃーアメリカが有利であると
language.
But
Japan
may
not は思いますが。
necessarily
be
disadvantageous for this fact.
I consider that technological 自分はどちらかというと、情報網
多分、冷戦が終わって、英 advancements
for の発達が大きかったのではと思い
語が広まっていったので、 communication systems are ます。あのー。
英語がトールとして使わ the main reason for the 昔は、電話がなかった時代には、
World English
れるようになったのでは
global spread of the English
ないでしょうか。
language around the world. I
English might have spread after the mean
that, in order to
cold war ended.
communicate with people
living on the other side of the
その時は、どうしてです world,
we
need
a
か。
communication protocol.
Why do you think so?
Then, when it happened コンピューターはアメリ when
people
start
カが一番進んでいたので
communicating with people
すか。The IT system was the most in other countries, the U.S.A.
advanced in the US at that time?
was the strongest country of
the world, and English was
spoken in that country. It
英語が最も使いやすか means that English was in
ったというか。
the right place in the right
English was the most suitable to time.
隣町に情報を伝えるのは大変だっ
たではないじゃですか。それが今、
電話一本で繋がるようになって、
簡単に繋がる、今は世界の裏側に
も、今、簡単に電話できるように
なったではないですか。そういう
つながりが広まった時になにか共
同のプロトコールが必要になっ
た。
となった時に一番の強国であっ
たアメリカの共用語であり公用語
である英語が必然的に広まってい
ったのではないかと思います。
まー。コンピューターは英語で動
いていたんです。あと、その、あ
まりにも、やっぱり英語以外の文
字はコンピューターを扱うのは不
In addition, the computer
アルファベットという system has been already
意味でですか。
operated in the English
It that means the Roman Alphabet?
language because of its
suitability.
Other languages are inferior
to English in operating on
computer systems.
For instance, in order to type
利だったという事だとも思いま
私は韓国語は判らないで
し、漢字なんて無理だし、
operate IT?
Japanese must type twice.
すが。 I am not familiar with Japanese language has fifty
Korean language.
phonetic alphabets, which is
では、ハングル文字が世 too large to store on
295
す。
例えば、日本語だと、
“あ”と打つ
のにもローマ字でうつのに2回キ
ーをたたかなければいけないし、
かといって、日本語 Key board と、
こんど、50 音だと、キー配列が倍
になってそれはそれでまたたいへ
んだし。ひらがなだけでも大変だ
ていうか、漢字変換はいまだに改
良の余地があるくらいで、まとも
にひらがなを漢字に自動変換する
界後になれなかったのは
っているのはきわめて困難なタス
computer.
韓国がつ強くなかったか Automatic Kanji conversion クであるし、
らですか。
over
PC
is
almost
Then, it is possible that because impossible.
Korean letter was symbolic, even it Ideographic languages are
would be difficult to be the global not suitable for computer
leader?
operation.
冷戦の時の予算をコン If Korea was the strongest
ピューターの開発にむけ country of the world then,
たということはないです Korean language could have
表意文字をコンピューターできわ
か、
う な あ あ い う 文 字 (symbolic
been a world language.
The budget for the cold war is Russian language would be
spending for IT today.
impossible to be a world
PC は大衆家電にレベル language because of its use
の価格におちたと思いま of hieroglyphs (i.e. symbolic
す。
letter) which is not suitable
PC is as inexpensive as home
appliance.
megabit while symbolic
発達するようになったの alphabets need only one
ですか。
megabyte for the identical
When it was that Japanese language contents.
became manageable on IT?
It means that, in order to type
English text, it would take
one-minute
whereas,
今、改善されているわけ Japanese texts requires two
The difficulty to operate PI in
Japanese has solved now?
(One hour)
携帯も面倒ですが。
Mobile
phone
troublesome.
is
sometimes
音文字の方が楽であったと。。。
まー、だから、例えば、かりに韓
国がアメリカの立場だったら、ハ
ングル文字を使っていたらハング
ルだったら単純に世界語になれた
んじゃないですか。ハングルのよ
character)文字だったらね。
自分も全然知らないですよ。
まーそれでけの問題だと思いま
す。
多分、ロシアの文字も表意文字で
すよね。あれもやはりコンピュー
for computer system.
As I already said earlier, ターで扱うのが大変だったと思い
hieroglyph letters takes two ます。
いつごろが日本の処理が
ですか。
めて扱いが困難であるのです。表
あと、そのー、文字構造の割り
当てから言いますと、さっき言い
ましたように英語だったら一バイ
ト必要なところを日本語だったら
二倍と必要で。
で二バイト必要だとどういうこ
とが起こるかというと、単純に処
理が倍になるのですね。つまり同
じレベルの文章を処理するのに、
minutes.
So, it takes one year to type 英語だったら一分ですむのに日本
English sentences while it 語だったら二分かかると。という
takes two years to type
Japanese sentences.
It is rather new that all
Japanese alphabets have
become available to use in
computer system.
のは仮に一年かかる仕事だった
ら、日本語では二年かかるという
ことで。そういうことが起こるの
で、今でこそ日本語の処理はでき
るようになっきていますが、その
当時は非現実的でした。
It was just unimaginable やはり日本語の処理が一通り整
ったのは、自分の記憶ではごく最
until recently.
For example, there is a 近です。Window 95 の時点で大分、
variety of Japanese names 出来てますけど、人の名前の漢字
296
which were not possible to とか特殊なのが多いのをご存知で
record in the Window 95 すか、日本語で。日本人の名前の
system.
It was after the introduction
of „Window Vista system‟,
学習は時間がかかります which enabled to operate
しね。
every Japanese name.
It takes time to learn anything.
It is not easy to talk about
complex systems to manage
Japanese
alphabet
in
漢字があまり常用で使われていな
computer system.
It was since the year of 2004
when a computer system has
become available to manage
Japanese language.
Learning cost is high and
User 側がそれほどまだ理解でき
い、日本人ですら見たことがない
漢字がたくさん出てくるので、そ
ういう漢字の名前が処理できるよ
うになったのは、本当に最近です。
で、まだそれがまだ普及していな
いというか。使えるようになって
いるのですが、使う側というか、
ていないので。
平均レベルで日本人が、その、文
字構造とかそういう概念でコンピ
ューターがどうやって文字を処理
しているかとかいう知識がないの
many people do not want to で、そこらへんがようやく整って
きているという事を知らないの
study.
People
tend
to
be で、まー、時間かかるでしょう。
その辺の漢字を一通り処理で
old-fashioned.
It would be difficult to きるようになったのは 2004 年の
字数企画がようやく整ったので
master a new interface.
その文字構造が使えるようになっ
Not so many people want to
use a new idea.
People feel happy with what
they have.
たのは Window のビスタからなん
です。
まーあと,
しょうがないですよね。
At the same time, human 自分も使ってますけど、やっぱり、
beings are conservative to a 一般的には、もう・・Interface が
かわってしまったら、学習が大変
new idea.
なのですね。
というよりも、やはり保守的な人
間は多いのは。
どんなのもが、新しいアイディア
There had been a joke that a が出てきても、みんななかなかそ
personal computer should う受け入れてくれないじゃないで
use two megabyte not one.
すか。というより、いままでで十
分だと感じていたのに新しいもの
It takes a lot of time to なんていらないのではないじゃな
いかと。
accept a new idea.
297
あのーー、結構、ねたにされて
It takes time and costs a lot いるのですけど、泳法さんのよう
に、スパコンは1じゃなくていい
to learn a new thing.
I am also similar in that I んじゃないですかと。2でいいの
じゃないですかとみたいな、そん
tend to be an old guided.
なのがあったんですけど、まーそ
んな感じで。
まー、新しいものを受け入れるの
に時間がかかかるのですよ。
学習しなくてはいけないので、勉
強コストが、まー、そんなに勉強
が好きな人はそう多くはないです
よ。まーぼくもそうですけど。
Education psychology
I think the environment
いままでで、ご自身の人 affects us.
生で一番自分の影響があ It is difficult to define what
ったものはなんですか。 environment is.
What had influenced your life?
But I owe a lot to my family
(One hour and 3 minutes)
and thanks to the schools that
最初の英語を勉強する M I had attended.
は?
Let me see, motivation of
What was your motivation to study English‟s study...
English?
After all, English skills
現 在 は ? How about these would be indispensable. For
days?
example, I have to read
research articles, and run
Motivation
computers in English.
まー、周囲が作ったんじゃないで
すか。まー家族、学校なんか、周
囲をなんと定義するか難しいです
が、家族と学校と、やっぱり自分
が持っているものがあるのではな
いでしょうか。
うーーーーん。
(silence)
やっぱり単純に必要不可欠だっ
たから。
変わらないです。論文も読まなく
てはならないし、コンピューター
も英語でさわらなくてはいけな
い。
I am not aware of setting any 自分はゴールは設定していない
自分になにかゴールを設 setting any goal.
と思います。
定してとかクラスの目的 English language was not はい、必要に狭まれて。
は、、
、それは変化しまし necessary in my daily life.
まーあまり自分はそういうこと
たか。
はしないです。
No, I do not think of a goal.
Goal
Have you set any goal in your life?
特に長期中期のゴールを
設定して学習することは
ないですか。
For example, mid-term goal or
short-term goal.
Attribution
For failure, let me see,
298
失敗に対してですか、うーーーん。
原因は?
Why?
I am living with others. Once
in a while, I feel I want to ことが多いです。
自分がやりたかったこと
blame others.
が実現できた時はどうい After all, I look at myself.
うふうに思いますか。
I attribute my success to the
What do you attribute toward your environment.
まー、人間ですから、多尐、他人
success?
あー。それは周囲の環境だったと
に八つ当たりというのもあるかも
しれないけど、体外自分のせいだ
と思います。
思います。
Self-esteem
would
ど う し て そ う 思 い ま す surprising low.
Self Esteem
か。
Why do you think so?
be 自分は相当低いと思います。
うーーーん。
やっぱり客観的に見てしまうとい
Let me see…
It is because I view myself うか、さめてみているというか。
objectively.
I do not have a self-concept. あまりないというか、
自分自身に何か出来る事 Let me see, in other words, まー、早い話、自分自身しか出来
など、自分に価値に結び there would be few things ないことはあまりないというか。
つく。
that only I can do.
Self-Concept
Do you have any particular image
about yourself?
Let me see,
英語でここが変わってい I wish that if there was
たら今が違っていたとい English exposure in my life.
うことなどありますか。
If I had more environments
Do you have anything that you wish to listen to English earlier,
to change in the past or future about my English skills would be
EFL?
better.
どういったところであっ It is good to have English
Changes
たらいいと思いますか。
うーーーん、やはり、コンスタン
トに英語は聞かされる環境があっ
たらましだったかと思います。
学校とかでいいと思います。
exposure at school.
Where did you want to have
English environment?
Mr. Hashimoto is friendly talker and opened to introduce his knowledge of acoustic
engineering. He was also humble to talk about himself. He attributed his success for
environment despite a lot of engineering knowledge. He is the only student who has never
traveled abroad. He also has hidden humors to make a listener relaxed. Mr. Hashimoto sent
his quick reply next day to my mail inquiry on
28th January 2011
Mail
sent
299
1.ご両親の育てられ方、Praise or Punishment.いつも褒めてくれたり励まされた
のか、厳しく御育てになら れたか。
2.Self-Efficacy.なにか自分がしたいと思うとき、自分にきっとできるという気持ち
が(例:いつもある。そうでもない)など。
3.英語を話す国に対してもお持ちになられているイメージ (例、積極的、こわい
Reply
返信遅くなりました。
1.比較的優しく育てられたと思います。
2.そうでもないです。
3.うらやましいなあと思います。
(自分が英語できないので、論文読んだり、プログラミングのリファレンスを引くときに
非常に苦労しているため。
)
Mr. Ha‟ reply on 29 January 2011
返信遅くなりました。I am sorry to be late in answering your letter.
1.比較的優しく育てられたと思います。My parents raised me with praise.
2.そうでもないです。Not so much.
3.うらやましいなあと思います。I envy it. Because I have difficult time, to read papers and
check references of programming. (自分が英語できないので、論文読んだり、プログラミングのリファレンス
を引くときに非常に苦労しているため。
)
Post - interview note:
Mr. Ha has lived and attended school in outskirt of Tokyo before entering university. He
spoke in a polite manner throughout the interview. Mr. Ha was opened to introduce the
relationships between IT system and language education. He is interested in „sound‟ i.e.
music and considers that Shadowing is useful for English education.
300
Appendix 7:
Interview transcription 7)
th
7) Mr. Ta;BA of mathematics interviewed on 14 September 2010 at AM10:30
Name :Mr. Ta
1. Gender :
1. Male 2. Female
1.BA(
2. Grade
3.
4.
5.
1
年)、2. MA
3.
PHD
1. Science (mathematics) 2. Humanity ( ),
3. others (
)
Location of junior high Studied at a public school in England until middle of
the first year in junior high school, moved to Thailand
school
and studied at a British school in Thailand until high
school graduation.
Location of senior high British School in Thailand ( Bangkok Pattana School)
Subject discipline
school
6.
Type of high school
7.
Overseas
experience
8.
1. National 2. Public, 3. Private
living 1.Yes ( from 9 years old to 18 years old、) country of
living ( UK and Thailand )
Self - assessment of Writing: (excellent, good average, unsatisfactory)
Reading:(excellent, good average, unsatisfactory)
English proficiency
Listening:(excellent, good average, unsatisfactory)
Speaking:(excellent, good average, unsatisfactory)
9.
The first
contact/use
language
time to 1. since I was born
English 2. 1-3 years old
3. kindergarten
4. elementary school
5. junior high school
10. I began learning English Primary school in the U.K.
when I was at
.
11. usage of English in Before entering university ( d. every day )
dairy life
After entering university ( c. a few times a month )
12. a) Nil, b) a few times a
year, c) a few, d) times
a month, e) every day
13. I
have
been
to 1.Nil, 2.Yes (
)
I
have
lived
in
UK
for
four
years,
English-speaking
I have also lived in Thailand for four and half years.
countries.
14. Travel
experience
foreign countries
to
1. Nil、 2.(unaccountable)
Spain (3) France (4) Belgian (1) Asian countries
(Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Cambodia, India,
Hong Kong)
301
7) The transcription of Mr. Ta, on 7th Feb. 2011 ( Mail texts in italic)
Icebreaking
When I was 9 year-old, my
旅 行 は 良 く な さ い ま す family and I moved to the UK.
か。
While I was in the UK, my
Do you travel a lot?
family travelled to many
countries
in
Europe.
For
example, Spain, France.
僕は 9 歳の時から海外に行っ
language In England, we speak in English.
For the second foreign language,
study in Europe
ヨーロッパでは多くの言 the students learn French or
葉を話す方がいらっしゃ German at school. Then, students
るようですが、ヨーロッ were able to understand two to
パの国はどんな感じでし three languages, although with
たか。
limited fluency. However, we
In Europe, there appear to were able to have simple
be many bi/multilingual conversation for our daily life.
ヨーロッパでは、イギリスで
speakers. Do you have any
したが、日常会話ぐらいはで
impression about life in
きました。
Traveling experiences
Foreign
ていたので最初はイギリスに
父の転勤で行っていて、ヨー
ロッパ内でフランスとかスペ
インとか家族で遊びに行きま
した。
は第一言語として英語を使い
ます。
第二言語で、フランス語とか
ドイツ語だとかいう授業があ
りましたので、みんなそれを
受けていたので、二三カ国ぐ
らいの言葉を、ぺらぺらにし
ゃべるまでにはいきませんで
Europe?
School experiences in I attended a public primary
school - ten minutes away from
UK
イギリスではどんな学校 my house and I walked to the
へ 行 っ て い ら し ま し た school.
か。
Then, I entered to a private
Year 5-6までは近くの公立
secondary school at year six. It is
その時はご両親と一緒に about fifteen minutes away from
いかれましたか。
my home.
Did you go to school with your I was still young and my mother
parent?
sent me to school every day by
car.
6 から、secondary school で
の Primary school に行って
いて、そこは徒歩 10 分ぐらい
で家の近くの村の小学校とい
う感じに行ってました。Year
車で 15 分ぐらい離れた所に
ある私立の学校に行っていま
した。
いや、まだちっちゃかったの
で、両親というか母親と一緒
に毎朝通学していました。
Language experiences My home was located in Sally in 南部のSally州というと
ころでした。
Southern England.
in UK
イギリスはいろいろな方
言があると思いますが、
どこにお住まいでした
か。
302
Where in UK did you live?
どんな言葉を話します
People in my neighbourhood 英語はやはり判りやすくきれ
か。
spoke English, which was easy to
What kind of English do understand. When I visited
they speak?
Scotland, I thought English
北の方は行ったことがあ spoken there is very different.
いな英語を話す人が多かった
りますか。
英語がちょっと違いますね。
です。
スコットランドとか行ったこ
とがあります。
I lived in the UK for four and はい、イギリスで 4 年半過ご
すか。Have you lived in half years. Then, our family した後、またすぐに父の転勤
any other country?
で タイ のバン コク に引越 し
moved to Thailand.
海外生活は他にございま
合計何年ぐらいですか。
In total, how many years
have you studied aboard?
それまではどんな学校に
通っていらっしゃいまし
た か 。 Did you study in
I attend ended a British
international school in Thailand.
Altogether, I lived abroad in nine
years.
Before I moved to the UK, I
attended a public school in Japan.
て、バンコクでは英国系のイ
ンターナショナルスクールに
高校卒業まで過ごしました。
合計 9 年です。4 年半イギリ
スでその後、タイが 4 年半で
す。
それまでは日本の公立の地元
Japanese school as well?
の学校です。
最初にイギリスへ行かれ
The biggest cultural barrier that I やはり言語面の苦労が多かっ
たとき、どんな苦労がご
had in the UK was language ざいましたか。
English problems
What was the most difficult When I arrived to the UK, I could
thing in UK?
not understand nor speak any
English.
日本人学校というチョイ I did not see any Japanese people
スがありましたか。
in my neighbourhood. There are
Did you have any choice to cultural differences and I was in
study at Japanese school?
dismay at first.
Yes, I had a choice to attend
Japanese school in the U.K.
However, my mother wanted to
give an international education
for the children - my sister and
myself.
たです。
イギリスに行った時は英語が
全 くし ゃべれ なか ったで す
し、だれも日本人がいなかっ
たので、文化的な違いがあり
ましたし、かなり戸惑いまし
た。
はい、ありましたが母親がせ
っかく海外に来ているので海
外の教育を受けさせてあげた
いという思いで海外の教育を
受けることになりました。
Six months before our family はい、イギリスに行く前に転
海外に行く前に英語に触 moved to the UK, I attended 勤が決まってから海外に行く
Juku experience
れたことがございます
English Juku near the station.
か。I attended an English We learned very simple English
class once a week before expressions. For example, “This
our family moved to UK is a pen.” or “What is your
303
まで半年ぐらいの時間があり
ましたが、その間に駅前の英
会話スクールがあって、そこ
に通い、簡単な単語のような
and learned from NET in a
class of 2-3 people.
ものを、例えば鉛筆とペンと
name?”
They are so simple, and nobody か、あとあなたの名前はなん
いろいろな刺激を使いな
use them when I arrived to the
がら学ぶと思いますが、 UK.
その時は読み書きはなか No one said to me “This is a
ったですか。Did you have pen.”
と言うのとか、本当に簡単な
ことを習ったんですけど、い
ざ現地に行ってみるとそんな
こと、
「This is a pen.」とい
ってことは余り意味がないの
smile
lessons?
でーー(笑い) smile
It was not useful.
何回ぐらい行かれました (Before Mr. Ta moved to the Nativeの先生でしたけ
か 。 How often did you U.K.)
ど、同じぐらいの年頃の生徒
writing
and
reading
At Juku, the class was a small
でー、その方は何人でし class, about two to three students
たか。How many students in a class.
in a class?
We learned from NET.
楽しかったですか。Did Juku was enjoyable. We played
you enjoy Juku?
games in English.
が2-3人ぐらいいて、まー
それでは8歳ぐらいの時
読めたんですが。まー簡単な
attend the Juke?
ほとんど遊びみたいな感じで
すね。
ゲームなんかもしながら英語
を使うという感じです。
読み書きはアルファベットは
が初めて英語に触れたの
I was able to read the Roman ことは読めたんですけど、で
で す か 。 Then, you first alphabets. I was able to read もやっぱり、まー、音楽を聴
simple sentences then.
of eight.
We practiced listening skills with
楽しかったですか。
music in English.
Did you have good time?
We also drew pictures with
その時はどんな先生でし English instruction.
たか。
I attended the class once a week.
Do
you
have
any I learned from a Canadian
impression about our NET? teacher.
learned English at the age
いたり、耳とかあと絵とかを
使って学習するということで
す。
週に一回です。
カナダ人でした。
はい、
一緒に受けていた友達がすご
く中が良かったので。
Yes, I enjoyed Juku because I had はい。
はい、楽しかったです、友達
friends there.
が一緒に行っていたので。
Indeed, I enjoyed a lot.
Because I had friends in Juku.
Yes, we have two English
現在大学で英語の授業が classes.
One is „English ありますか。
Only”, which is the monolingual
Do you have English class class by an Australian teacher.
at the university?
We saw videos and did some
はい、あります、えっと、二
グループワークもありま
Video をみたり、ワークシー
EFL at the university
worksheets afterward.
すか。Do you have group
activities in class?
それは必修科目ですか。
つ あっ て、あ の、 ひとつ は
Native のオーストラリアの
先生と English Only という英
語 だけ のクラ スが あって 、
ト を解 いたり する んです け
The other English class in the ど、もうひとつは、日本人の
university is for reading skills by 先生で、サマーセットモーム
304
Are those EFL compulsory
subjects?
the NNET. We read the stories of の小説を読むというくらすな
Somerset
Maugham.
The んですよ。一人づつ生徒が、
何先生まで採らなくては
students do oral translation from
いけないのですか。How English into Japanese in turn.
many years do you have to Yes, we have these compulsory
take EFL?
English lessons for two years.
英語を読んで、それを翻訳す
週に二回ですか?Twice a
はいけないです。
るんです。
はい、そうです。
英語は二年生まで取らなくて
Let me see, the NET has nearly そうですね。
二つの授業を比べてなに 300 students in his class.
えーーと、そのー。オースト
か特徴、印象はございま Because of the large class size, ラリア人の先生に習う授業は
week?
すか。
the students rarely ask questions
Do you feel that those two to the NET.
classes are different in Then, the students are passive
some ways?
learners in class.
In contrast, the NNET class is
much smaller and he only has 20
本当にもう大きな講義室です
ので、300人ぐらいいるの
で、こちらから質問する時間
がないので、Passive という
か受けるだけの授業なんです
けど。
逆に日本人の先生は 20-30
to 30 students in his lesson.
グループワークはありま We sometimes speak English 人ぐらいの教室でやる授業で
す か 。 How about group such as for discussion in class.
discussion とか話す機会も
works?
そのグループは三人です
か 。 Three people in a
group?
対訳ですか。
その Presentation は日
本語ですか。Do you make
presentations in Japanese?
However, there are only Japanese
students and we tend to use
Japanese, although it is not
desirable to speak Japanese in
EFL classes.
We seldom have group activities
in English classes.
We often have individual
あるんですけど、その反面、
はやり日本の生徒とかで一緒
にやるので、どうしても日本
語になるので、英語を使わな
いので、それだと英語学習の
英語の授業の意味がないので
はないかと。
あまりグループワークはない
オーストラリアの先生に
presentation assignments and the ですね。
質 問 す る 時 間 が あ り す students make a presentation in でもあまりないですね。
か。
一人ひとりが前に出て、発表
turn.
Yes, the presentation is the
to NET?
translation of the Nobles.
ではパワーポイントとか Let me see...
使って、一方的な講義で Most teachers think that Japanese
すか。
students do not ask question in
Lessons were conducted class.
Do you have time to ask questions
するとか、
いいえ、その和訳ですね。
うーーん、先生も多分、日本
人はあまり質問しないという
ことを判っているので、あま
り 質問ある?とか言うこ
とを言ってこないのです
Four minutes and 50 second Therefore, the lesson progress ね。
in the second tape
systematically without much むしろどんどん授業を進
surprise.
めテイク感じですね。は
with power points.
305
い。
In the E-mail response
At out university, I have an NET‟ 今の大学では、週に一度ネイ
English class as a compulsory
subject... All the students in
science major have to attend
English courses. .
ティブの先生による英語のみ
を使う必修の科学のコースが
あるのですが、将来理系に進
む人は英語が必須となるため
生徒もこれを一生懸命勉強し
ます。
Experiences in the UK
ではイギリスの経験を聞
はい、そうですね。うーーー
Let me see,
In the UK,
と、イギリスでは週に、マー、
I had a supervisor sitting right
next to me in the class.
がたいです。
He helped me for six months at
その先生は何人でした
school. He attends the class with
か。
me in every lesson.
He said to me that he would help
me whenever I cannot understand
English in class. He stayed with
me in class for six months.
学校で Supervisor みたいな
If I cannot understand English, I
cannot understand the context of
any subjects.
At first, he taught me the basic
English vocabularies such as
„triangle‟.
In addition, I had a private tutor
outside the school once a week.
やっぱり英語が出来ないと他
I learned English grammar and
English comprehension after the
ありましたか。
class.
Did he teach English?
This private tutor was an English
では、年配の方でしたか。
woman.
Is he retired from school?
I think she was a retired teacher.
Five minutes and 14 She was an elderly woman.
I learned from her one-to- one.
seconds
She was very kind and I was very
師の人についていて、文法と
comfortable to study with her.
I am not sure whether the
か。その学校独自でした
supervisor system exists only in
か?
my school or in the UK education
判らないですね。スーパーバ
かせていただければあり
その先生の専門は英語で
Supervisor System はイ
ギリスのシステムです
306
方がいて、すべての授業につ
いてきてくれて、英語だけで
はなく数学とか理科とか。す
べての科目で判らない事があ
ったら聞くように言われて、
半年ぐらい一緒についてくれ
て、その人にいろいろ質問と
かするようにします。
の科目もできないですね。
だから、他の周りの人とは違
うこと、基礎的なこと、三角
形の名前とかそういうところ
から始めたのです。
それと加えて、週一回、学校
とはまた別に、英語の家庭教
か英語の Comprehension とか
をやっていました。放課後で
した。
イギリス人でした。多分、昔、
教師で退職なさったとか。年
配の方でした。
そうですね、一対一で結構や
さしくしてくれて。
イザーシステムというのは、
結構、生徒さんの親とかボラ
ンティアのような感じかもし
Is the system available in
all school in the UK?
れませんね。
system.
It is good to have such a system 率先して、そういう制度をつ
その方は毎日授業の時に
to help non-native English
横にいてくださったので speaking students.
すか。(Did she stay with Yes, my supervisor offered helps
you every day?)
every day for six months.
After that, the students help me.
Then, six months later, a new
foreign student arrived in my
class. It was my turn to help the
くって、その外国人を助けま
student.
I already had the same
experience with him.
When I was a sixth grader, a
Japanese student arrived to the
school and I helped him a lot as
本人の人が一人入ってきたの
半年後に他の方の指導は
大変でしたね。
It is rather hard to help
other
students
only
6
months after you arrived to
the UK.
しょうって。
はい、授業の時に横にいらっ
しゃいました。それで、あの、
半年ぐらいしてそれが終わる
と生徒同士が助け合っていき
ます。
僕が Year 6 に上がって時に日
ですね。その時には、今度僕
が彼をいろいろ面倒を見るこ
とになって。
で、彼に英語の ESL がありま
したが、普段の授業の時はぼ
くが横にいて助けてあげて。
well.
やっぱり、小さい時はすぐに
He attended ESL classes.
He studied in our class for other 覚えるんですよ。毎日英語ば
subjects and he sat next to me in
class so that I was able to help
him.
It was easy to adjust at young
ages.
We gradually get used to the new
environment.
I also helped other student by
っかりの生活をしていると大
体わかってくるようになるん
ですね。
まー大変でしたけど、自分も
そ うい う経験 があ ったの で
「こういうことをやっておい
た方がいいよ。
」とか。
giving some suggestions.
ESL at UK school
ESL は別にはありました
か。(Did you have ESL?)
MFL としてはどんな外国
語を勉強なさったのです
か。
What language did you
take in MFL?
I do not remember if there was
the ESL system in the UK.
I do not think there are formal
ESL class there.
I took French in MFL.
The unique system in the U.K.
education system was the ability
grouping system
番下のクラスにいた人 English class had three levels.
は何人でしたか。
How many students in each
section?
あったようなないような、ち
ゃんとした授業はなかったよ
うに思うんですね。
フランス語をやってましたで
すね。
ただ、まーイギリスで特徴な
のはレベル別に分けるではな
いですか。
At the beginning, I was in the 英語の授業も三つぐらいに別
れてるんですよ。僕も一番下
lowest proficiency class.
Some British students in my class のクラスにいたんですよ。で
307
すべての科目でレベル could not spell English words もその一番下のクラスにいる
別でしたか。
well. After seeing those students, イギリス人の子達もあまり英
I felt relieved because I thought
in section group?
my English is getting closer to
native speakers‟.
下のレベルのいる方は何 Then, I am motivated to work
人でしたか。
harder to catch them up.
What nationality student did you The students there were Anglo
have in the class?
Saxon.
いろいろ他の人種の生徒 We also had students from Africa
語が出来ないのですよ。
がいましたか。
んばろうと思うようになりま
What subjects did you learn
in younger grades.
Are there many international In my class, we did not have
students?
students from Africa.
すべての科目がレベル別 There was a new Korean student,
でしたか。All subject?
and he was already able to speak
英語は母国語としての英 good English and he was
語ですか。Do you mean
that English is L1?
なんか、全然スペリングとか
もめちゃめちゃで先生の言っ
ていることがわからないみた
いな生徒がいて、そういう子
たちと自分はあまり変わらな
いのではないかと。自信が出
てきて、それがまたもっとが
した。
白人の人だったと思います。
ひとつ下の学年には黒人の子
がいて、同級生の中では黒人
の方はいなかったですね。
studying in the middle or 韓国人のいたんですが、その
人は英語が出来たので真ん中
advanced level class.
The
classes
for
English, か 一番 上のク ラス にいま し
mathematics and science adapted た。
the level system.
英語と数学と理科はそうでし
Yes, English means L1 study.
た。
はい。
English
experiences
learning One of impressive memories in イ ギ リスの Primary School
at the primary school was „flip で印象に残っているのは本が
elementary school in chart‟.
UK
It was similar to picture cards in
小学校の英語の時間は Japan.
どんなものでしたか。
While teachers were talking, she
How did you learn L1 in the drew lines on the sheets for her
UK?
explanations.
For reading class, we had
different textbooks for different
Progress of English proficiency classes and we
proficiency
practiced oral reading.
英語が不自由しなくな
大型の紙芝居みたいになって
いて、それに先生が前に出て
線をひたりして、これはこう
いう意味ですよとかやって。
そ れが 結構僅 尐に 残って い
て。
あとはそうですね。レベル別
に本が決まっていてそれを皆
が読むんですけど、それを音
読 した りして 読む んです け
ど。
ったのは
By the end of year 6, I did not そうですね。Primary School
When your English skill have any problem understanding か Year 6 とか。
308
improved a lot?
その後行った現地校が私立校
English.
その学校は通いですか。
ではもう普通の授業をうけて
その学校では楽しい思い
At the private secondary school, I
出とか、苦い思い出とか had no problem leaning in
ありますか。
English.
What are your good and painful From now on, I need to write
memories at English classes?
many English essays.
I had difficult time to write a
long essay in English because I
lack experience of writing
も大丈夫でした。
スピードという意味で exploratory essay.
あと、Handwriting は、ちょ
はなくて。
っと、字が汚かったので。な
In addition, my handwriting is
Do you write fast?
not neat. In England, I had
difficult time to write English
ありましたか。
neatly.
ホワイトボードを使っ The students at the U.K. school
ていましたか。
Did you use a white board at
school?
はい。
逆に今度、自分からドンドン
作文を書かなくてはいけなか
ったのです。
作文は、あまり長い文をあま
り 書い たこと がな かった の
で、苦労しました。
かなかきれいにかけなかった
のが辛かったですね。
きれいさという意味で、今も
そうですけど、結構、字が汚
use personal computers and いので、、、へへ(smile)
あとイギリスではパソコンが
seldom write by hands.
However, we had to do my 多いので、プロジェクトはパ
homework in handwriting.
Yes, there was a smart board in
14 minutes in second the class.
tape
It was similar to a white - board.
There were projectors and power
points in the class.
ソコンで提出するのでしたけ
ど、ちょっとした提出物はホ
ームワークはハンドライティ
ングで出さなくてはいけなか
ったので。
あー、スマートボード、結構、
復旧しだしたころです。
It was time when a smart-board えーと、ホワイトボードでし
become been introduced in UK たね、普通のインクみたいな
schools. It looked like a 物でした。
プロジェクターとパワーポイ
white-board.
ントはありましたけど。
We write with regular ink.
We had a projector and power
point as well.
I was 13-14 years old when my 13-14 歳ぐらいでした。
そうですね、まー、もともと
family moved to Thailand.
それでパタナに移られる
I was already familiar with 8 歳からイギリスにいたので
British School in BKK
のですが、何歳ぐらいで
したか。
How old were you when you
moved to Thailand and entered
English speaking environment
that time.
It was not so difficult to adjust a
new life in Thailand.
309
イギリスのスクールシステム
に慣れていたので、インター
ナショナルスクールにいくの
はあまり抵抗はなかったです
to a British school?
The teachers at the British school ね。
先生もイギリス人でしたし。
came from England.
楽しい思い出とか、エピ
I did not study Thai Language
and
it
was
difficult
to
communicate with local people in
Thailand
When we travel outside Bangkok
city, I could not communicate in
English.
Nevertheless, I had no problem
ソードを聞かせていただ
けますか。Do you have
any
good
memory
in
Thailand?
パタナで辛い事はなかっ
たですか。
Did
you
have
pain-taking
memories?
and At the secondary school, the
students did a lot of reading, and
語彙はどこで獲得してい reading got more difficult.
ったと思いますか。
Native speakers have a lot of
How did you learn your vocabulary. I consider myself a
English vocabulary?
non-native
English
speaker
Speed-reading?
ると、英語があまり通じない
ですし、僕はタイ語を勉強し
なかったので、なかなか現地
の人と迅速な Communication
が取れなかったというのは悔
しいです。??
ただ学校の中ではみな英語を
communicating
at
school. しゃべれるので、学校の中で
Everyone spoke English in the は、Communication の不自由
はなかったです。
new school.
Reading
vocabulary
スピードとか
でも、やっぱり一歩街中に出
because
I
lack
English
vocabulary.
I enjoy reading a lot.
I attended Saturday School held
by the MEXT in the UK and I
used to read a lot books in
Japanese at the library there.
I read three times more books in
ただ、内容が増えるので、難
しい書物とか読み出すので、
それが結構大変でしたけど。
ただやっぱり英語が第二言語
だなと感じるのは語彙がやっ
ぱり尐ないと思っているので
すよね。
もともと僕、本を読むのが好
きで、結構海外にいる間も、
土曜日に補修校があって、日
本語学校があったのですが、
そこで図書室があって、読書
量では日本語の本をたくさん
読みました。
Japanese than those in English.
I have no problems reading 日本語の本は英語より三倍ぐ
Japanese books because I have らい余計に読みましたね。
enough Japanese vocabulary.
Vocabulary
Although I did not use Japanese
language much in daily life, my
Japanese vocabulary is enough
for reading.
As for English vocabulary, I have
そういう意味では、日本語は
no
problem
studying
mathematics or science in
English.
However, I do not have enough
とかそういう専門的なところ
310
あまり使ってはいませんでし
たけど、語彙は日本語の方が
かなりあると思います。
英語だと、学校で使う、理科
で使う単語はすぐに覚えられ
るんでうすけど、
文学とかで使われるきれいな
辞書はどういうものを使
いますか。
What kind of dictionary do
you use?
コンコーダンサーは?
Do you use concordance?
vocabulary to express myself 言葉があまり身についていな
くて、もう尐し、
well.
Lexical knowledge may be
acquired in literature.
I always wished to speak
persuasive or rhetorical English.
For example, I wish to use some
English
humour
or
add
savoir-faire in English.
My spoken English is honest and
なんか、人と話していて、面
白いことが言えたらいいなと
か、もうちょっと機転を利か
せた Joke を言えたらいいな
と常に思っていました。
自分の英語が余りに正直すぎ
straightforward but I feel that my
English expressions are rather
boring.
I do not have an electrical
dictionary and I use book English
– English dictionaries.
て、面白みがないかと思いま
How do you use I do not have many opportunities
to use English now.
English now?
英 語は 今どのように Currently, I use English to read
newspaper and listen to Radio
使っていますか。
How do you use English in your News.
daily life?
The other day, I had a rugby
match against Imperial college
いまスポーツはラグ team.
We had a party after the match.
ビーですか。
The, you participate rugby team When I was talking to members
at the university?
of the Imperial college, they
そうですね、なかなか使う機
praised my English.
す。
電 子辞 書は持 って いない の
で、紙の辞書を使ってなるべ
く英英辞書を使うことがあり
ます。
会がないので、あまり外国人
の大学にいませんし。読んで
聞 くと いう受 身な 使い方 で
す。ニュースを聞いたり、新
聞を読んだり。
たまーに、外国人と、
こ の 前 、 大 学 の imperial
collage のラグビーの学生が
来て、ラグビーの試合に来て、
その後、アフターマッチファ
ンクションがあって僕と一緒
の時に、「君は英語がうまい
I was so happy to hear that.
ね。」と言われて、それがとて
も嬉しかったですね。
Yes, I had attended Yobiko.
イギリスに行くまで塾に I graduated from the British
行かれましたか?
school in June of the year 2009
Did you attend Juku before you and I returned to Japan.
moved to the UK?
At first, I lived in a dormitory for
はい。
returnee students at Yobiko to
東大に入る前に、受験勉 prepare
for the university
強をしましたか。
entrance examinations scheduled
Did you also attend Yobiko in June of the same year - 2009.
ど。
Yobiko
311
あー、そうですね
あの、タイのインターナショ
ナルスクールを卒業したのが
2009年の6月なんですけ
そこ、六月からずっと、もう
あの、帰国人生用の予備校が
あって、そこに一人で、そこ
before
applying
to
the
university?
It means that I returned to Japan の寮もあって、そこにずっと
before the high school graduation 入って日本の入試用の勉強を
to prepare for the university.
English is always an important
subject to apply for any
university.
I felt that English for the
university exams were very
different from English that I
learned at British school.
していたのですけど。
先に帰国してそこに入ってい
たのですけど。
でもやっぱり、英語がどこの
大学にも入試科目の一つとし
てあるのですが、日本の入試
用の文法問題とかやはり特殊
な感じがしたので。Japanese
English in Yobiko could be English というか、そういう
のが予備校へ行って学んで。
“Japanese English”.
結構海外ではそう いうのは
やらないんです。
I did not study English Grammar
at school in British school.
Students spent a lot time on
reading in the U.K.
English taught at Japanese school
海外の英語の授業では文法は
focused
on
accuracy
in
grammatical
and
lexical
knowledge.
In order to answer the university
entrance exams, I did not use
grammatical knowledge but I
relied on my intuition.
This might be differences
て、一種の法則を当てはめる
between how native English
はい。Indeed.
speaker and Japanese students
感で行くと半分ぐらい当 learn English.
たりますか。
It may be difference of EFL at
After relaying on your intuition Japanese school and the school
to answer the question. How outside Japan.
much correct answer did you Yes, the most of the time, I had
get?
correct answers on the exams.
“Articles” in English was one of
ンドン黙読しながら、どんど
English
experiences
in
UK
正確性とかですか。Do you
mean accuracy in grammar?
全くなしですか。
You
did
not
grammatical
learn
any
knowledge
school.
正確性とか?
あ、確かにそうです。
I understand.
あ、そうですか。
I see.
at
やらないで、
全くなかったので、ほとんど
講読でしたけど、でも日本で
は文法とか正確性を求められ
みたいで。
僕の場合はそういうのを問題
を解く場合でもいちいち文法
的にに考えないで、感で、た
とえば黙読してこれがふさわ
しいなと思ったら、自分でド
んうめていったんですが、
そこが日本で取り組んできた
人と違うんです。
はい、大体あたるんですよ。
た だ 一 番 難 し い の は
Article、a とか the とか、品
詞、あれはいくら練習しても
the most difficult. For example, I 出来なかった。難しいですね。
need to think whether to use “a”
or “the”.
312
I learned English grammar イギリスはこんなことで、週
イギリスでは習わなかっ from my private tutor in the U.K. 一回の家庭教師のところで
Article
たですか。
She was an old woman. (Smile)
Did you learn article at school She
taught
me
linguistic
in England?
knowledge that I did not learn at
おじいさんのところで。 school.
Was your tutor male or female?
I learned English grammar from
おばあさんのところで。 her.
Your grandmother then,
When I look it back, the lessons
from he is quite useful.
おばあさんのところで、へへ
I did not learn “tense” in English
at school. It was quite useful in
later days.
I was quite young that time and
she taught me how to use „tense‟
in writing.
past tense とかテンスから。
へ
おばあさんのところで、学校
ではやらないので、結構文法
も きっ ちりや って くれた の
で、あとから考えると助かり
ました。
そうではなくて、やっぱり、
言われませんでした。
やはり小さかったので、そう
いうのじゃなくて、文章書く
時に必要なテンスとかを教え
てくれました。
予備校のですか?
Juku for university Yobiko?
entrance examination Yes, yobiko focused on grammar.
予備校ではどのように勉 At first, we learned English はい、そうですね。
強しましたか。
grammar.
How did you learn English at For returnee students, in applying
Yobiko?
engineering
study
at
my
どんなものをやられまし university, English essay writing
たか。亓文型とか?
was required.
Did
you
learn
sentence I learned how to write English
structure?
writing from a Canadian teacher.
その方からは冠詞とかは Yes, returnee students require
最初、文法中心に教えてくれ
厳しく言われましたか。
はい、帰国子女の場合はエッ
Did they talk about articles?
入試トレーニングは半年
ぐらいでしたか。国立大学
入試に Hearing が入ったと
聞きますけど、エッセーだ
けでいいのですか。
どういったものを教わる
のですか。Structure
essay-writing examination to
apply the university.
Japanese teacher (NNETs) did
not teach how to write English
essay.
The student at Yobiko practiced
English essay on a A4 paper.
Then, the NETs checked our
writing and gave feedback.
るのですけど、東大の場合は、
理系の場合はエッセーだけで
試験されるので。
その先生は、その人は、カナ
ダ人の Native だったと思う
んですけど、教えれくれまし
た.
セーだけでした。
日本人の先生はエッセーとか
は教えてくれないのですね。
はやり A4一枚くらい書くで
はないですか。そういう時は
外国人の方がいいです。
はい、Structure とか例文と
Yes, we learned English sentence かです。
大学入試ではテーマがあ structure at Yokibo.
こういうとか。。
。
とか?
って書くのですか。
Yes, (a topic of essay was given はい、そうです。
313
from the university.)
English Let me see, I think, my English
has improved a lot when I was
skills
色々な英語の経験をなさ ten years old, which is second or
っていますが、いつが一 third year after I moved to the
番伸びたと思いますか。 UK.
When did you think your English Yes, ( I was at the public
has improved the most?
elementary school)
イギリスの Public スク In the UK, I was in the lowest
ールの時ですか。
class at the primary school and
う^^ん、やっぱりーー。そ
attended the middle level class in
the following year. Then, in the
third year, I attended the second
lowest class.
In my third year, I attended the
second best class.
These advancements had given
me
self-competence
and
motivated to work harder.
はずっと一番下のクラスでし
Progress
of
When you are at UK public school?
英語のクラスのレベルは
段々上がっていきました
か。
Did you improve to high section in
English class?
その時に周りを見ている
と、二番目と三番目の違
いは何ですか。
I thought that the students in
advanced class and lower one?
different proficient levels classes.
Quality ですか。
For example, in debate course,
それはどうしてでしょう their opinions are different from
か。What make them different? those in slow learners.
ご両親の影響とか?
Let me see... Why these
Parents „influence?
differences come from?
性格?Individual characteristics? I attended the private school and
うですね。うーーん、二年目
か三年目ぐらい、10歳ぐら
い が一 番伸び たと も思い ま
す。
そうですね。
あー。クラスですか。そうで
すね。あ、primary school の時
たけど、
Secondary School の時は、一
番最初は、一番下でしたけど、
その次の年には3番目のクラ
スに上がり、その次の年は二
番目のクラスに上がって行っ
てそれがまた自信になってき
ましたね。
What are differences of students in
下のグループはずっとし
たですか。The
students in the
やっぱり、生徒自身が違いま
すね。
Quality というか、生徒の意欲
と かや っぱり 違い ますし 、
Discussion をしていても話
していても話す内容が違いま
す。
the students‟ family backgrounds うーーーん、どうしてでしょ
う。
were similar.
lowest level class stay there without
Personality characteristics?
あまり移動がない?
It may come from initiatives to
attend the class.
It is rather difficult to know why
individual differences arise.
Reflections:
Too many The students in the higher level
私立だったので、やはり貧富
tend to stay there while the
students in the lower level class
also tend to remain in the same
level.
こ は難 しい問 題だ と思い ま
many member changes taken place.
leading questions!)
314
の差ではなかったと思います
が、むしろ生徒自身。
性格? ふふふ (smile )
生徒自身の意欲だったり、そ
す。
やはり、そこは難しい問題で、
でもやっぱり、小さい時から
上にグループでやっている人
は、ずっと、やはりずっと上
にいて。
したのグループは下にいると
いう。余り移動がないんです。
For me, listening is the most
今、一番得意なスキルは proficient English skill.
何だと思いますか。
Yes, I am able to eavesdrop on
ほとんどのものが判りま most conversation around me.
すか。
(explicitly)
案外、Listening が得意だと
Let me see…
English?
Every
English
skills
are
いま、一番必要なスキル important.
は何だと思いますか。
Let me see.
What skill is the most important I need to improve writing skills.
はり全部大事だと思いますけ
English skills
Do you understand everything in
思います。
はい、判ります。III- 4 on Oct
4th
うーーん。何でしょうね。や
どね。
あーーー、やはり、
あーー。Writing につきます
ね。
English skill?
ご自身の中で、今、一番
専 門的 な文章 を書 いたり 、
不足しているスキルと
I will have an increasing number Formal な手紙を書いたりす
of opportunities to write English る機会が増えると思うのです
か。Do you want to improve
some
of
English
skill?
Authentic なもの?
(30 minutes)
けど、そういったフォーマル
such as academic papers.
I must improve English writing な英語をどんどん書いていっ
てこなしていかなければいけ
skills.
ないと思います。
English teaching principle
Phillipson が Linguistic
Do you mean the language death Minority 言 語 が 滅 び る と
Imperialism という本を by that?
いうのですか。
かかれましたがご存知で
すか。
いいえ、英語の話者が多
いですが。
End of the second tape.
English should be I think the Monolingual Method それは、やっぱりある意味で
would be useful because we need は有効だと思いますね。なぜ
taught monolingual
なら、英語ですべてやれば、
to think in English.
英語で思考することが可能に
It is difficult to speak English
unless we change our thinking
mode
into
English
from
Japanese.
315
なると思います。
でも大学で行って思うんです
けど、大体の人はやはり一度、
日本語に直さなくてはいけな
In English classes at the いと思うんですよ。直しても
日本語訳が必要だと思い university, I feel that, the most う一度英語に変換しなくては
ますか。
students have to translate the text
Do you think it better to from English into Japanese at
use Japanese in EFL class? first.
From this, I would suggest that it
is necessary to change our
thinking ways. For instance,
adapt logical thinking.
NETs
do
not
understand
いけないんですが。
そうすると、英語で全部やっ
ても、根本的に思考法を変え
な いと 英語が 出な いです よ
ね。
うーーん、でもNative
の先生は日本語ができないで
すよね。だから、うーーん、
Japanese. Therefore, it would be でもやはり日本語があった方
more helpful to have L1 for が安心出来るのではないかと
思います。
comprehension in EFL.
3 〕 The earlier the I agree.
From my experience in the UK, it
better
語学ははやければ早いほ would be good to start learn
ど い い と い わ れ て い ま English from the age of 6 to 10
す。
year - old and the students need
It was said that the earlier the to work hard.
better to learn English.
何歳ぐらいでしたか。
How old was she?
それはやはり自分自身もそう
思いますね。
自分自身の経験からいって、
多分、一番、6 歳から 10 歳ぐ
らいの間に英語とか語学をび
しびしやった方が覚えやすい
However, taking my nine- year old younger sister‟s case, she
began attending a nursery school
in the UK at the age of four. She
also attended a reception year 1
for one year.
She used to speak English very
well.
と思いますね。
I used to speak with her in
English every day.
It was so interesting that she was
able to understand Japanese
spoken by her parents.
て、それまで彼女は現地のN
ただ一の妹がいるのですが、
九つはなれた妹がいるのです
が、イギリスに行ってちょう
ど 4 年目ぐらいで現地の
Primary school の Year 1 、
Reception にいって、Year 1
にはいる前の Year 1 に行っ
urseryに行っていて、
で、彼女は英語が完璧にぺら
ぺらで、日本語がほとんど出
来なくて、家ではずっと英語
でしゃべっていて、僕と英語
Her English pronunciation and でしゃべっていて、ただなん
gestures were like those of native か不思議なことに、日本語で
親が何か言うとそれは判るら
speakers‟.
その時は何歳でしたか。
How old your sister when she
arrived to UK?
She was a little baby when she
arrived to the U.K.
My sister ate only English food
such as fried food.
316
しいんです。わかって、答は
英語で返ってくるのです。
彼女は発音とか動きとかすべ
て外国人を真似て完全に溶け
She spent a lot of time with her 込んでいたのです。
生まれてから半年、赤ちゃん
English-speaking nanny.
She was surrounded by English
speakers in the U.K.
After four and half years in the
そうすると 9 歳ぐらいで UK, our family moved to
日本にお帰りになって。 Thailand.
Then, your sister returned to Then, my sister attended the
Japan at the age of nine?
Japanese speaking kindergarten.
She played with Japanese friends
there.
In a short time, her high English
proficiency had disappeared very
fast.
It means that, English skills
acquired at The, her English
今はどうですか。
でした。
食べ物も揚げ物みたいな物し
か食べなかったし、二歳ぐら
いからイギリスの乳母さんみ
たいな人に預けられていたの
ですが、周りがイギリス人じ
ゃないですか。だから英語で
ずっとやっていて。
それからタイに帰って、日本
人の社会とばかり付き合って
いて、日本の幼稚園に行って、
そしたら英語なんかすぐに忘
れちゃって、今度は日本語で
しか言えなくなって。
そう思うとやはり小さい時は
skills have disappeared so early.
Considering her case, the earlier 得るのも早いけど、失うのも
ご両親の会話は何語です English is learned, the faster they 早いと思います。
How about now?
か。
What language does your family
speak?
lose the skills.
She lives in Japan now and she
even does not remember that she
spoke English so well.
Today, she does not use English
at all and her memory in the UK
disappeared completely.
Our family speak in Japanese.
はい、英語は全く出来なくな
って、今は日本に住んでいて、
いま英語を出来たことですら
覚えていないです。
日本語です。でも僕と妹と二
人になった時、英語を使いま
す。
Nevertheless, I try to speak in
English with her these days.
English at Japanese I think it is good to introduce
English at elementary school in
elementary school
日本の学校に小学校に英 Japan.
語を導入するということ When my sister attended the
に対していかがでしょう Japanese
kindergarten
in
か。
Thailand, she did not speak
What do you think about English at all. The situation
learning
elementary
Japan?
English
school
would be the same in EFL at
in Japanese school in that it is
difficult to develop oral skills at
school without English exposure
at
317
いい事だと思いますね。
ただ、僕の妹は、タイで、日
本人の経営している幼稚園に
入って、インターナショナル
部というところにいったので
すが、先生は native の先生が
教 える という 感じ だった の
で、でも周りが日本人なので、
周りの人と英語でしゃべるこ
とはなかったので。
そう考えると、日本の小学校
で英語をやるのも一緒で、周
outside school.
It is also difficult to communicate りの人が全部日本人だと日本
人同士が英語でコミュニケー
in English among Japanese.
Even if English is adapted in ションをとるのは難しいと思
electuary school, it is difficult to います。
日本の学校へ入られた理 develop oral skills at school.
あまりしゃべれるようになら
由はどうだったのでしょ
うか。Why did your parents
give your sister to Japanese
school system?
ないと思います。
I think that my parents decided to それはやはり日本に帰る事を
send my sister to the Japanese 見越して、日本語を学ばせな
kindergarten in Thailand because いと日本で苦労するなと思っ
そうですか。I see.
we had to return to Japan in a few
ではやはり語学という意 years.
味を大切にして。
Once our family returns to Japan,
そうですね。
she had to attend Japanese
国によってインターナシ school.
ョナルスクールの月謝が International education in Japan
ちがいますね。
I
understand
education
fee
that
at
あとやはり金銭的な意味もあ
ると思います。日本に帰って
インターナショナルスクール
へ行かせるのはものすごくお
金がかかると思うので、やは
is very expensive and, I think, my り現実的に日本の学校に行っ
the parents thought it financially た方がいいと思ったと思いま
the difficult to send their children to す。
give international education in
varies greatly in different Japan.
countries.
Therefore, I think, my parents
decided to send her to Japanese
kindergarten in Thailand.
Now, I remember that there were
many immigrants in UK and
people in affluent family spoke
international
たと思います。
education
はい、あー尐し思ったのです
が、イギリスでは移民が結構
いるんですけど、やっぱり、
裕福な家庭の移民はやはりき
れ いな 英語を しゃ べりま す
ね。
パタナの先生も、結構、イン
ド系の先生がいたと思います
が、彼らはかなりきれいな英
good English.
語をしゃべるにたいして、で
It was similar in Thailand.
For example, at my international も、イギリスに住んでいても、
school in Thailand, an educated
Indian teacher spoke beautiful
English while native speakers of
English from a poor family speak
English with strong accents.
English spoken by the people
貧しい人はやはりかなりなま
りの強い英語をしゃべってい
たと思います。
たとえばガソリンスタンドの
店員とか、もしかしたら彼ら
は二世移民なのかもしれない
working at a petrol stand in the けど、同じ人種でも経済力に
U.K. was not the same with よ っ英 語が全 く違 います よ
English spoken by educated ね。
persons in the UK even if they
318
live in the same country.
It may be partly because their
financial background would be
different.
アジアの国は経済力を高める為に英語力をつけようとして Introduction
of
JET
いますが、例えば JET プログラムとかが例です。と言う会 program in South Eastern
話をいれた。
Asian countries
2) The best English I agree that it is desirable to learn
teacher
is
Native English from NETs.
There is authentic atmosphere in
speakers.
では、NET の長所は何で NETs‟ classes and that Japanese
しょうか。
student would be more attentive
What are advantages of native in class.
English speaking teachers?
Japanese students have respect
toward NETs but they do not
考えは話す言葉でできる develop
many respects to
ということにして、どう NNETs.
でしょうか。
NET has more professional
Do you think that language attitudes
and
professional
affect idea or identity?
やっぱり、そうですね、それ
はその通りだと思います。
Native Speaker だと まず 最
初に第一に、NET は生徒の方
が、ちゃんと聞きますよ。生
徒が、
。やはり日本人だったら
馬鹿にするでしょうけど、こ
の人なんだろうと思ったりす
るでしょうけど、ふふ、学ぶ
ほうも誠意をもって対忚する
でしょうし、教える方もやは
りプロフェショナルなひとな
のでそういう自覚を持って教
atmosphere.
えてくれると思うので。
Importantly, it is good for やっぱり、なんというか、英
students to think in English in 語でものを考えるということ
が出来ると思います。
NETs‟ classes.
influence For me, I usually think in 自分自身の体験からいうと、
僕は普段、日本語で考えるの
Japanese.
言語が考えに影響すると However, when I get excited, I ですが、感情的になった時、
Language
over idea
言う説がありますが、そ begin thinking in English.
ついつい英語でかんがえてし
れに対してはいかがでし
まうんですよ。たとえば罵り
ょうか。
There is a theory that language
influence idea.
How do you think about this
theory?
For example, English has more
vocabulary in abusing people.
English language has more
impacts when we abuse others.
From this, I think that language
stimulates feelings of human
beings. .
言葉とか英語の方が、
straight ですし、種類があり
ますし、なんかいいやすいし、
やっぱり、インパクトがある
んで、そう考えるとやはり言
語的に感情をつかさどること
があるでしょう。
Then, I do not think that English
study effects national identity.
Media or TV has stronger
influence over thinking.
319
でもそれによって日本人のア
イデンティティーが崩壊する
と言うのは考えすぎだと思い
ます。ただ小学校で教えた場
合のはなしですが、むしろ、
media とか日常のテレビとか、
そっちからの影響の方が大き
いと思います。
Foreign
language I want to ask you a question.
study (MFL) in the Japanese students study English
in Japan and students in the UK
UK
study the modern forcing
それはそうです。Indeed. language (MFL) once a week.
パタナでも同じですね。 However, the most students in
あー、僕、ひとつ聞きたいこ
語とかやっていても、できる
language became more popular
the UK did not develop oral skills
in MFL classes.
I was able to speak English
because of my environment that
English was necessary in my life
such as to make friends.
However,
English
is
not
necessary in daily life in Japan.
Therefore, Japanese students are
in
not motivated to study English.
必要だったので学んだと思う
The case was similar in the
MFL in Patana school.
MFL でも亓カ国が在り
ましたが、日本の経済が
良かったときは日本語、
中国の経済がいい時は中
国語がはやりました。
When I was teaching, Chinese
MFL
because
Chinese
とがあったのですが、日本で
英語教育を研究する際、例え
ば、イギリスでも週一回外国
語教育をやりますよね、でも
イギリスでも週一回フランス
ようになった人はほとんどい
ませんよ。
そうですね。やっぱり、ぼく
がやはり英語がすぐにできた
のは、生きていくのに必要だ
ったからで。自然に覚えたの
は、英語が絶対必要だったか
らで、イギリスで英語が絶対
economy has started to grow.
ので。III-3 on Aug 3st でも
出来た生徒は、台湾人の
I guess, an Australian student that
生 徒 は よ く で き ま し た you are talking about might have
ね 。 Yes, the students from a desire to study Japanese to
Taiwan did well.
enjoy Japanese cartoon.
やはり、日本では英語が絶対
しかしオーストラリア人
ともいます。
の生徒は余りできなかっ
そのオーストラリアの生徒さ
た。
んも、例えば日本のアニメが
An
Australian
student
必要だという機会が余りない
ので。だから生徒も危機感を
持ってやらないのではないか
好きだったから始めたのでは
was
ないかと思いますがーー。
struggling because of language
differences.
English only class
Let me see,
What shall I say,
In French MFL class, I always
wished that it would be more
comfortable if my French teacher
うーーん、やっぱり、そうで
use English in the MFL class.
If a Japanese student wants to ask
a question in English in EFL
class, the student might feel
り尐し先生が英語でしゃべっ
320
すね。うーーん。Monolingual.
あー
うーーん、でもやっぱりフラ
ンス語でやっている時、やは
てくれたら心強かったなと思
いました。
やはり、日本人先生がずっと
awkward to ask the question in 英語を使っても不安だし、逆
に何を言っていいか良くわか
English in class.
Because students would worry らないと思います。
about making English errors in 例えば先生に「質問あります
か。」と言われた時、本当はあ
front of others.
るのにそれはどうやって言っ
Then, in English only class, they ていいかわらないとか、自分
students
would
develop が失敗したら、みんなに何か
言われるとか、と思っていて
threatening feelings.
なかなか発言できないとか、
やはり恐怖心が、monolingual
だと生まれると思います。
6) English should be
learned
to
communicate
with
Native
English
speakers.
It is rather difficult question to そうですね、うーーん、正し
い英語がそもそもあるのかと
answer.
いうところに問題があります
I do not think that all English よね。
spoken by native speakers is all Native Speaker がしゃべって
いる英語が正しい英語かとい
correct.
うと、本当はそうじゃないと
LF と言う英語がありま
すが。
LF
is
English
spoken
by
non-native speakers.
However,
Native
English
speakers understand non-native
speakers‟ English with accents
(deviated).
Let me see,
Miscommunication が 一
つの問題だと思います
が。
It
is
problematic
miscomputation in LF.
to
have
思います。
やっぱり、Native Speaker の
人としゃべる目的でやると、
でも Native Speaker はこちら
があまり上手ではない英語で
しょべっても理解してくれる
I
am
worried
that と思うのですが、うーーーん、
miscommunication may arise in やはり英語があまりできない
English communication between 人同士がしゃべったら意思の
Native speakers and non-native 疎通が難しい時が多いと思い
ます。
speakers of English.
4) English as a lingua In our future generation, an
number
of
franca or Standard increasing
opportunities to use English
English
Reply from the mail,
would arise. In addition, an
increasing number of people
travel abroad. . Therefore, I
これからは、英語を話す相手
think, learning Standard English
might not be enough to learn at
school.
I would
suggest creating
でもいわゆるネイティブの発
321
も非英米圏からの人がほとん
どとなるでしょう。これは、
一生涯日本に住み続ける人、
海外に出て行く人に共通して
いえることです。だから学校
音だけを聞いても十分ではな
いと思います。
リスニング教材にはそういっ
opportunities to invite non-native た非ネイティブたちの、話す
English speakers in local 物を入れても面白いかもしれ
communities to introduce LF.
In Hamamatsu city, there are
many second generation of
Japanese descendants from South
American countries speaking
Portuguese.
ません。またその学校の地域
特性に会った外国人との英語
による交流を促進しても良い
のではないでしょうか。
例えば日系南米人の多くすむ
浜松などではポルトガル訛り
の英語を話す人たちと交流し
On the other hand, it is possible たり、
to introduce English spoken by
people from India.
Therefore, in addition to teaching
grammatical
and
lexical
knowledge in Standard English, it
might be a good idea to introduce
インド系の多くすむ地域では
そういう人たちと話すなどで
す。
そういった実践で使える英語
の体得と、普通の Grammar や
読解もあわせて行っていくと
LF in the part of the teaching より効果的であると思いま
す。
materials in EFL.
5〕English should be In the UK, I did not use
taught by the Direct dictionary or used translation in
my head.
Method.
いつも使いながらの教授 However, I brought a Japanese法が良いといわれました English dictionary all the time.
が、
Nevertheless, I did not use it in
The Direct Method was popular. class.
Then, let to say,
The Direct Method might not be
僕はイギリスの現地校でなら
ったので翻訳とか一切なかっ
たのです。ただ和英辞書は常
に持っていました。辞書は持
っていて、持ってたんですけ
ど、授業の中では英語だけだ
ったのです。
あーー、日本の読み書きが出
来ない段階で使ってやったら
effective for students who あまり意味がないかもしれな
already
acquired
Japanese いですね。
reading and writing skills.
Reply from the mail in
italic letters.
I began to think that the Direct
Methods is useful after the
students achieved to certain age
when they have readiness to
learn in English-only class. That
ダイレクトメソッドは、ある
is to say, at the university, I
attend the English course by
NET. The course is required for
all students in science major.
必修の科学の course がある
322
年齢に達し専門知識を身につ
けてからの方が効果的だと思
うようになってきました。今
の大学では、週に一度、Native
の先生による英語のみを使う
のですが、将来理系に進む人
は英語が必須となるため生徒
もこれを一生懸命勉強しま
As I said earlier, I think it is す。
difficult to improve English skills 先の問いにもあったように何
without motivation. .
Therefore, the Direct Method in
Japanese school is rather
inefficient due to a lack of goal to
study English among Japanese
students.
らかの動機がないと語学はな
かなか上達しないと思いま
す。だから、日本の普通の公
立学校でダイレクトメッソド
を取り入れても生徒はなぜや
るのか分からないため効果が
尐ないでしょう。
English I had admirations to English- あー。憧れみたいなものです
か。憧れがありました。
speaking countries.
speaking countries
Image
to
英語圏に対してなにかイ
メージがありますか。
Do you have any image about
English speaking country?
あのー、余り関係ないのかも
I always wished to learn
rhetorical and authentic English.
Language has different levels of
authenticity.
It is not so effective to learn
English from NNETs.
It was truly good experience to
しれないですけど、英語を習
うのなら、きちんとした英語
を 習い たいと 思っ ていま し
た。タイ語、権力みたいなも
のと言語が関係あると思うの
で、やっぱり、はは、どうし
ても、外国人の先生に英語を
learn English by NETs in the UK. 習うのは余り良くないと思い
ます。イギリスの先生に教え
ていただいた英語の方が効果
的だったと思います。
and At first, I thought that language
skills affect national interests.
英語が国力に影響すると However, looking back the
思いますか。
history of the last 100 years,
うーーーん、最初は僕もそう
Japan has achieved economic
successes, which is next to the
U.S. and surpasses these in the
UK and Germany despite lacks
of English skills among Japanese
people.
However, it is difficult to predict
how
Japanese
economical
develop in the future.
の経済大国になったではない
If
Japanese
economic
development have to rely on
exports or in service sector,
English proficiency would be
難しいので、今度逆にサービ
7)
Language
national power
Do you think language affect
national power?
産業の推移ですね。
Changes are taking place in the
history
development.
of
industrial
323
思っていたのですが、でもこ
の百年ぐらい、ずっとそう言
われてますけど、日本は第二
ですか。イギリスより、ドイ
ツより、アメリカは別として
日本は、経済力を取ったので
はないですか。そう考えると
ーーー・しかし。これから将
来日本がどうするかという話
になると、これから日本が輸
出産業だけでやっていくのは
ス業とか、知的な分野、情報
とか観光とは、となるとやは
り英語がもっと重要になって
important for Japan.
Today, the tourism
く るの ではな いか と思い ま
is
not す。
promoted in Japan.
It might be one reason why we
have a few foreign travellers in
Japan.
観 光が 日本は 栄え てない の
で、外国人が尐ないのは、英
語が通じないという点がある
のかもしれません。
同級生の方は外国人の交
We have students from China, 同級生で、結構あの、中国と
換留学生の方がいらっし Singapore, and Rumania.
シンガポールからとルーマニ
ゃいますか。
アの留学生がいるのですが。
Do you see many exchange
students in the university?
There are a number of courses in
English, but many students do
not speak English. If the teacher
ask question, students answer in
English.
大学でも英語を使った授業が
ありますが、大半の生徒は積
極的に英語を話そうとしませ
ん。
しかし先生の直接的な質問
に対しては。
Education Psychology
Motivation
When I arrived to the UK, あのー、イギリスに行った時
英語をなさった時の最初
English was necessary in my
の動機は?
life.
What is your motivation at For example, I wanted to make
school?
friends to play with. Then, it
32 minutes
was necessary to speak English
動機は変化すると言われ to make friends and play with
ていますが、今は?
them.
Motivation is said to be changing. I hope to keep my English
What is our motivation to study
English now?
skills.
Today, although I do need
English in my life, being a
bilingual speaker is a part of my
identity, and I am happy about
it.
Further, I need to read academic
journals in English.
For example, for physics, we
は、やはり生活の為というか、
具体的に言うと友達が欲しか
ったし、遊ぶ相手がほしかっ
たので、やっぱり英語をしゃ
べ れた 方が友 だち と遊べ る
し、
やっぱり、ひとつは英語を維
持したし、まー、アイデンテ
ィティーと言うか、一種の誇
りあるわけですよ。あまり口
に 出し ては言 わな いです け
ど。
それにあとは論文とか、やは
り国際研究に関しては英語が
必要なので、物理やるにして
も何をやるにしても、英語で
論文を書くので、そしたらそ
must write essays in English. の ため には英 語が 必要な の
English is indispensable for で、学術の為には英語が必要
students in all academic です。
disciplines.
324
Goal from mail reply
In the UK, the school adapted 最初の滞在国イギリスでは、
level classes system for English 基礎科目(英語、数学、理科)
(L1), mathematics, and science.
At first, I was in the lowest level
class to study in these classes.
My goal of study at school used
to be to advance to higher class,
and to communicate with
friends and teachers in English.
.
は能力別にクラス分けが行わ
In Thailand, my goal was to get
higher score in GCSE or IB.
University
entrance
examination
became
my
motivation to study well.
The results will have impact to
は、うまくなって友達や先生
れていました。はじめはどの
科目も一番下から二番目や一
番下だったので、なんとかし
てテストでいい結果を出して
上のクラスに上がりたいとい
う goal を持ってやっていま
した。あと特に英語に関して
と話せるようになりたいとい
う個人的なゴールもありまし
た。そのあとタイに行ってか
らは、統一テスト(GCSE,IB)
で良い結果を出すというゴー
apply to the higher education ルを持ちました。またその二
and it was necessary to work つの試験は
大学入試にも影響するのでよ
hard.
りモチベーションを高くして
勉強する必要がありました。
Being a bilingual is part of my ア イデ ンティ ティ ーと言 う
をもっていらて、すばらし identity.
か、一種の誇りあるわけです
Self-concept
いと思います。
よ。
I admire you that you have
independent ideas.
Self Esteem
I think that I have a high あー、思いますね。例えばラ
自 分 自 身 が 好 き ? Do you
グビーの選手がきて、翻訳の
society.
self-esteem.
For example, when rugby team
from England visited our
university, I was praised for my
English skills.
Then, I felt that I have a role
to play.
I am happy to help foreigners
on the street to find their
文化に影響させられる。In
destinations, for example.
あと、なんか、街の中で尋ね
feel comfortable about yourself?
ポジティブ Are you positive
thinker?
何かが出来る。It means the
conference
to
make
thing
realized.
社 会 に 貢 献 で き る 。 In
お手伝いをしたとき、英語が
うまいねと言われたらすごく
うれしいし、ラグビーチーム
の為にも、なんか、自分が他
に持っていない役割があると
いうか、貢献できたというこ
とがうれしいです。
Japanese culture.
られたときに、自分がきちん
出来上がっている家庭に
と案内でできたことによって
必 要 な も の は 、 Role
感 謝さ れれば やは り 嬉し い
325
model、経験、努力が必要
し。
Attribution
I sometimes say to my friends うーーん、やっぱり周りに人
Failure
that, “It is not your mistake to
have this failure.” However,
when it comes to me, I tend to
blame myself for failures and
attribute success to myself as
well.
Success
としゃべって、本当はお前が
悪いのではない、と言ってあ
げたり、また自分を責めるこ
ともありますけど。上手くい
った時は、上手くいった時は、
やはり自分が努力したんだと
思います。
Influential factors
Environment
affects
今ご自身があるのに一番
self-development a lot.
my うーーん、やっぱり環境が大
きく影響したと思います。
影響されたか。What or who
gave the most influence on your
life?
Self-efficacy をもってい After seeing many capable Silence
ますか。
students in the university, 東大に入ったらやはり、周り
frightening feeling had arisen に自分より何でも良く出来る
and is worried if I would be left 人が多いので、これから自分
を上げていかないと取り残さ
out from others.
れていくという危機感があり
ます。
In addition to English skills
ここが変わったら、著賀っ learned at school, I rather
ていたらよかったと言う wanted and want to improve
英語環境などありますか。 oral skills. For example, I want
Do you have anything that you to use English with humour. I
feel if your past or present EFL would like to speak persuasive
Change
experiences are different?
English or rhetorical expression
in English.
These skills might not be
acquired at school.
These skills may arrive by
meeting people, or watching
television. If I had the rhetorical
competence, I could have
enjoyed English communication
僕はむしろ、学校の勉強では
なくて、なんかこう、会話、
うまい会話ができる英語がで
きればよかったなーって最初
にいいたかったのですけど、
たとえが学校の英語ではなく
て、人を説得する英語だとか、
うまく感情を伝える英語だと
か、学校ではあまり教えてく
れない英語というのがあると
思うのですよ。
それはもっといろいろな
人の話を聞いたり、いろいろ
なテレビを見たりとして、話
術を学んだり、そういうとこ
ろを勉強したら、もっと人間
more.
I was able to develop a wider 関係が広がったのではないか
と思っています。
human network.
326
Mr. Ta spoke Japanese very politely. He had lived overseas since Elementary School days.
He is positive, but humble hard-working student. He sets his academic, language and sport
goals and appears to be enjoying the process. After entering the elite university, he said that,
he is worried whether he can maintain his current self-efficacy because he had met many
intelligent students at the university.
The first mail from Mr. Ta.
Date: Monday, 7 Feb 2011
嶋津様
早速質問の解答ですが、
1:最初の滞在国イギリスでは、基礎科目(英語、数学、理科)は能力別にクラス分けが行わ
れていました。はじめはどの科目も一番下から二番目や一番下だったので、なんとかしてテス
トでいい結果を出して上のクラスに上がりたいというゴールを持ってやっていました。あと特
に英語に関しては、うまくなって友達や先生と話せるようになりたいという個人的なゴールも
ありました。そのあとタイに行ってからは、統一テスト(GCSE,IB)で良い結果を出すという
ゴールを持ちました。またその二つの試験は大学入試にも影響するのでよりモチベーションを
高くして勉強する必要がありました。
The Direct Method
2 : ダイレクトメソッドは、ある年齢に達し専門知識を身につけてからの方が効果的だと思う
ようになってきました。今の大学では、週に一度 ネイティブの先生による英語のみを使う必
修の科学のコースがあるのですが、将来理系に進む人は英語が必須となるため生徒もこれを一
生懸命勉強します。先の問いにも会ったように何らかの動機がないと語学はなかなか上達しな
いと思います。だから、日本の普通の公立学校でダイレクトメッソドを取り入れても生徒はな
ぜやるのか分からないため効果が尐ないでしょう。
3:これからは、英語を話す相手も非英米圏からの人がほとんどとなるでしょう。これは、一
生涯日本に住み続ける人、海外に出て行く人に共通していえることです。だから学校でもいわ
ゆるネイティブの発音だけを聞いても十分ではないと思います。リスニング教材にはそういっ
た非ネイティブたちの、話す物を入れても面白いかもしれません。またその学校の地域特性に
会った外国人との英語による交流を促進しても良いのではないでしょうか。例えば日系南米人
の多くすむ浜松などではポルトガル訛りの英語を話す人たちと交流したり、インド系の多くす
む地域ではそういう人たちと話すなどです。そういった実践で使える英語の体得と、普通の
Grammar や読解もあわせて行っていくとより効果的であると思います。
327
以上です。返信に時間がかかりましたが、お役になればと思います。
The mail was sent to Mr. Ta on 1st Feb. 2011
1. Goal theory: ゴールを設定しながら学ぶと効果的といわれますが、ゴールには学校
(例、受験)、個人(英語をうまくなる)、長期(例、TOEC の点)短期(今日のやるこ と)クラ
ス(今日習うこと)などがあるとおもいます。いままでゴールを設定したり、しながら生活をな
さったきたでしょうか。もしございましたら例をあげて いただけるとありがたいです。2.
Direct method; Monolingual Method の質問を二度お伺いし、Direct Method (英語を
使って、活動を死ながら授業する、例、 Presentation, Discussion)をお伺い忘れました。。
Direct Method は日本の学校の英語の授業で適応させることなどについていかがでしょう
か。
3.世界にはスタンダード英語と Non Native 同士が話す英語などさまざまですが、日本の
小、中学校などの英語の授業でどんな英語を勉強したらいいでしょう。Communicative
method とか Grammar Translation などのご経験を踏まえ、なにか御希望などがありまし
たら、お伺いできれば幸いです。
Reply from Mr. Ta on 7th February 2011.
嶋津様
早速質問の解答ですが、
1:最初の滞在国イギリスでは、基礎科目(英語、数学、理科)は能力別にクラス
分けが行われていました。はじめはどの科目も一番下から二番目や一番下だったの
で、なんとかしてテストでいい結果を出して上のクラスに上がりたいというゴール
を持ってやっていました。あと特に英語に関しては、うまくなって友達や先生と話
せるようになりたいという個人的なゴールもありました。そのあとタイに行ってか
らは、統一テスト(GCSE,IB)で良い結果を出すというゴールを持ちました。また
その二つの試験は大学入試にも影響するのでよりモチベーションを高くして勉強
する必要がありました。
2 : ダイレクトメソッドは、ある年齢に達し専門知識を身につけてからの方が効果
的だと思うようになってきました。今の大学では、週に一度ネイティブの先生によ
る英語のみを使う必修の科学のコースがあるのですが、将来理系に進む人は英語が
必須となるため生徒もこれを一生懸命勉強します。先の問いにも会ったように何ら
かの動機がないと語学はなかなか上達しないと思います。だから、日本の普通の公
立学校でダイレクトメッソドを取り入れても生徒はなぜやるのか分からないため
効果が尐ないでしょう。
3:これからは、英語を話す相手も非英米圏からの人がほとんどとなるでしょう。
これは、一生涯日本に住み続ける人、海外に出て行く人に共通していえることです。
だから学校でもいわゆるネイティブの発音だけを聞いても十分ではないと思いま
す。リスニング教材にはそういった非ネイティブたちの、話す物を入れても面白い
328
かもしれません。またその学校の地域特性に会った外国人との英語による交流を促
進しても良いのではないでしょうか。例えば日系南米人の多くすむ浜松などではポ
ルトガル訛りの英語を話す人たちと交流したり、インド系の多くすむ地域ではそう
いう人たちと話すなどです。そういった実践で使える英語の体得と、普通の
Grammar や読解もあわせて行っていくとより効果的であると思います。
以上です。返信に時間がかかりましたが、お役になればと思います。
Ta
The second mail reply on 27th April 2011
嶋津様
お久しぶりです。質問の回答ですが、1. 大学でも英語を使った授業がありますが、大半の生徒
は積極的に英語を話そうとしません。 しかし先生の直接的な質問に対しては、一言二言英語の
単語を返します。つまり相手が何を言っているかはわかるが、どううまく答えを返すかがわか
らないといった感じです。一方、帰国子女や留学生はまとまりある文としての返事を返すこと
ができます。
2.両親は基本的に僕に勉強を押し付けることはしませんでした。海外で授業がすべて英語で
あったのと、僕は理系科目に興味を持っており両親は文系であまり僕のやっている内容をしら
なっかたのですべて自主的にやっていました。母国語に関しても、補習校や通信教育でやって
いたのでこれも自主的に行いました。ただ、挨拶や人間の基本的な事柄に関しては指導を受け
ました。これは、海外にいても日本にいても根本的なところは同じだからだと思います。
以上です。
Ta
3rd May 2011
Sent a transcription summery to Mr. Ta.
Reply from Mr. Ta. 9th May 2011
嶋津様
返信が遅れてしまい申し訳ありません。今回のインタビューは、嶋津さんからのさまざまな問
いに答える中で自分にとっても英語教育などについて考える良い機会となりました。
日本人としての、identity の葛藤をもっとも感じたのは英国滞在中のことであったと思います。
英国に住んでから三年あまりたって急激に英語力が上がっていたあるとき、ふと自分の考えや
独り言を英語ですべて行っていることに気づきました。日常生活の中で家の外では常に英語を
使っていたため自然とそうなってしまったのでしょう。ただ、家に帰れば親とは日本語で話さ
なくてはならないため、そこの切り替えが難しかったです。 また現地の友達と一緒にいると
き、自分が日本人だからどうしても他人扱いされているという疑心暗鬼というか思い込みをし
329
ていることがありました。そうした時は、自分も普通の英国人であれば良いと思いました。ま
た、僕の通っていた学校はキリスト系の学校なので、それを信じないで良いのかと宗教的な葛
藤があったことも覚えています。年を経て、タイに行ったときには大分自我というものが確立
していてまたタイ社会で日本人というものが確立されていたので自分は日本人だと割り切っ
て考えることが出来たように思います。またタイに行ってからは思考も日本語でするようにな
りました。これは大きな変化だったように思います。
以上です。Ta
9th August 2011 reply after sending the short writing.
嶋津様
スピーチに関する文章ありがとうございました。この文章を読んで思ったのですが、以前(海
外にいた時)は「何を」話すかに自分で焦点を当てていたのに対し、今日本で英語を話すとき
は「どのように」
、つまり自分のアクセントなどに気がいってしまっている自分に気づきまし
た。根本的には話す内容こそが最も大切であるはずなのになぜそういった別のところに意識が
行ってしまったのかは分かりません。僕の考えでは「自分は英語が他より尐し出来るんだ」と
いう過信から自分の英語を周りよりうまく見せなくては行けないという焦りからきているの
だと思います。だから一層内容を空虚なものにしスタイルにこだわって、その結果英語の表現
力が貧相になるという負のスパイラルに今の自分はいます。そして実際問題として前ほどはう
まく英語を使いこなせない自分に不安と焦りを感じています。
そして英語力を保持するための具体的な道筋が今の僕にはありません。ただできることをやる
のみです。
今回のインタビューは、海外で自分がいかに恵まれていたかを知る契機になりました。嶋津様
の
研究がこれからもうまく行くことを願っております。Ta
Post interview note:
Mr. Ta is a bilingual student, and spoke very politely in adequate speed, which had given
impressions that he has clear opinion about the interview questions. He wishes to develop
rhetorical competence i.e. speaking with humour or persuasively. He replied mail inquires
swiftly and answered the questions well.
330
Appendix 8
1) Self assessed English skills
(☆ - returnee student)
I am good at
Reading
Writing
Listening
Ms. Ot
Mr. Ka
Ms. Ho
Mr. Sa
Ms. No
Mr. Sh
Mr. Su
Mr. Ta,
Mr. Se
Ms. Ho
Ms. Za
Ms. Hi
☆
Speaking
Ms. Ku
Mr. Sa
Ms. Hi ☆
Ms. Za
☆
2) Least proficient English skill
I am not good at
Reading
Ms. Za
Writing (4)
Ms. Ku
Mr. Ta, ☆
Listening (3)
Mr. Sh
Ms. Ku,
Mr. Sa
Ms. Ho
Speaking (6)
Mr. Su
Mr. Ka
Ms. Ho
Ms. Za
Mr. Se
Ms. Hi
☆
Mr. Sa
Ms. To ☆
3) English skills for the current needs
What English skills do you use most in Japan?
Reading
Writing
Listening
Mr.Ta
Mr. Su
Mr. Ha,
Mr. Se,
Mr. Sa,
Mr. Ta ☆
Ms. Hi
Ms. Ho
Ms. No
☆ returnee student
Ms. Hi
Ms. Ho
media☆
school
school
Speaking
Ms. Ku on line
Mr. Ka with
musicians
Ms. Za on line
chat
school
school
school
4) English skills for the future needs
What English skills do you want to improve or learn more at school?
Reading
Writing
Listening
331
Speaking
pronunciation
Mr. Se
Mr.
(Academic
journals)
Mr. Ta
Ka Ms. Ku
Mr. Sa
Mr. Ka
Mr. Ha
Ms. Za
Mr. Ot
Mr. Su
Ms. Ho
Ms. Hi
Ms. To
Ms. No
332
Mr. Se
Fly UP