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The need for complex numbers

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The need for complex numbers
3
Complex numbers and
hyperbolic functions
This chapter is concerned with the representation and manipulation of complex
numbers. Complex numbers pervade this book, underscoring their wide application in the mathematics of the physical sciences. The application of complex
numbers to the description of physical systems is left until later chapters and
only the basic tools are presented here.
3.1 The need for complex numbers
Although complex numbers occur in many branches of mathematics, they arise
most directly out of solving polynomial equations. We examine a specific quadratic
equation as an example.
Consider the quadratic equation
z 2 − 4z + 5 = 0.
(3.1)
Equation (3.1) has two solutions, z1 and z2 , such that
(z − z1 )(z − z2 ) = 0.
(3.2)
Using the familiar formula for the roots of a quadratic equation, (1.4), the
solutions z1 and z2 , written in brief as z1,2 , are
4 ± (−4)2 − 4(1 × 5)
z1,2 =
2
√
−4
.
(3.3)
=2±
2
Both solutions contain the square root of a negative number. However, it is not
true to say that there are no solutions to the quadratic equation. The fundamental
theorem of algebra states that a quadratic equation will always have two solutions
and these are in fact given by (3.3). The second term on the RHS of (3.3) is
called an imaginary term since it contains the square root of a negative number;
83
COMPLEX NUMBERS AND HYPERBOLIC FUNCTIONS
f(z)
5
4
3
2
1
1
2
3
4 z
Figure 3.1 The function f(z) = z 2 − 4z + 5.
the first term is called a real term. The full solution is the sum of a real term
and an imaginary term and is called a complex number. A plot of the function
f(z) = z 2 − 4z + 5 is shown in figure 3.1. It will be seen that the plot does not
intersect the z-axis, corresponding to the fact that the equation f(z) = 0 has no
purely real solutions.
The choice of the symbol z for the quadratic variable was not arbitrary; the
conventional representation of a complex number is z, where z is the sum of a
real part x and i times an imaginary part y, i.e.
z = x + iy,
where i is used to denote the square root of −1. The real part x and the imaginary
part y are usually denoted by Re z and Im z respectively. We note at this point
that some physical scientists, engineers in particular, use j instead of i. However,
for consistency, we will use i throughout
√ this book.
√
In our particular example, −4 = 2 −1 = 2i, and hence the two solutions of
(3.1) are
2i
= 2 ± i.
z1,2 = 2 ±
2
Thus, here x = 2 and y = ±1.
For compactness a complex number is sometimes written in the form
z = (x, y),
where the components of z may be thought of as coordinates in an xy-plot. Such
a plot is called an Argand diagram and is a common representation of complex
numbers; an example is shown in figure 3.2.
84
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